Title: Abstract Municipal Solid Waste Management
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00001310/00001
 Material Information
Title: Abstract Municipal Solid Waste Management
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Abstract Municipal Solid Waste Management, by Olin C. Braids
General Note: Box 8, Folder 3 ( Vail Conference, 1993 - 1993 ), Item 24
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00001310
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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ABSTRACT
MUNICIPAL SOUD WASTE MANAGEMENT

Olin C. Braids
Blasland, Bouck & Lee


Many areas of the United States currently face serious problems in safely and effectively managing
the trash and garbage they generate. At the same time that we are producing more solid waste than ever
before, we are finding that there are limits to traditional waste management practices. Communities face
hard choices when weighing trash management options. Some pay premium prices to haul waste long
distances (out of state in some cases), others face conflicts over new landfill or waste-to-energy sites.
Characterizing the waste stream components is the first step in determining the value of recycling,
incineration, or ultimate discarding. The amount of waste is significant. If piled in a one square yard area,
the amount generated in one year would reach about 40 percent of the distance to the moon.

The major concem beyond space to store the waste is the effect it has on groundwater supply as
chemicals are released in leachate. The paper discusses some of the chemical indicators of leachate, how
they are generated, and how they can be used to define leachate-contaminated groundwater. Many of the
chemicals in leachate are not "exotic", but are common and inexpensive to analyze for.




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