Title: Water Resources Analysis Using Electronic Spreadsheets, Figure 3: Lotus Map of Mean Elevation (feet) per Square Mile in the Cypress Creek Basin
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00000694/00001
 Material Information
Title: Water Resources Analysis Using Electronic Spreadsheets, Figure 3: Lotus Map of Mean Elevation (feet) per Square Mile in the Cypress Creek Basin
Physical Description: Photograph
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Water Resources Analysis Using Electronic Spreadsheets, Figure 3: Lotus Map of Mean Elevation (feet) per Square Mile in the Cypress Creek Basin
General Note: Box 7, Folder 1 ( Vail Conference 1987 - 1987 ), Item 87
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00000694
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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18 -------|
160 200
15-
140 170 175 190 200 220
14-
70 70 70 80 140 100 10000150 200 150
13-
70 70 70 70 100 100 90 130 175 175
12---------------------
75 75 75 75 90 90 90 100 140 170
11 -
75 75 70 70 75 65 90 95 100 150
10 -
70 70 70 70 60 100 90 90 90 100 150 210
9---------------------------------
9 z
S75 75 60 75 75 75 75 65 100 90 100 140 220
8-----------------------------------
70 70 75 65 65 65 65 65 90 100 100 110 100 170
i 7.----------------------------------
70 65 69 65 70 70 90 100 110 120 100 140
6----------
55 55 60 65 70 75 100 115 115 115 115
5------ -- -------- -----------
55 50 60 65 80 80 90 95 95
S4.------------------------------- -- -
60 50 60 55
3-----------------------------------
50 50 50
2-
75 50
70 50 55
0
0----------F----- ---------
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
MILES
Figure 3. Lotus Map of Mean Elevation (feet) per
Square Mile in the Cypress Creek Basin.











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elevation values within the Cypress Creek Basin boundaries

were extracted from the data set so the values take on the shape

of the watershed.

Data Base Structure

Data entered onto a spreadsheet file can be used in many

ways, and are ready for manipulation at any time. Simple

statistics, such as a data point count, average, and standard

deviation, are included with each parameter file. Besides con-

taining selected annual, monthly, daily, and event data, each

section is fully documented to inform the user where additional

data can be found, as well as referencing the data included in

the spreadsheet.

All data may be stored on a separate file and imported into

the spreadsheet as needed for preliminary analysis. By saving

data files separately, the problem of memory limitation on any

particular spreadsheet is avoided. Once a certain set of data is

viewed and analyzed, a new set of data can be imported from

another data file and superimposed directly over the old data

set, thus avoiding the need for large data sets. If it is

desirable to save the work on the old data set, this too can be

saved as a separate file.

As stated earlier, all data sets for the Cypress Creek study

were documented within each parameter spreadsheet for easy

acquisition in future analysis. Documentation was either placed

beside the data, or was referenced as to where it could be found
elsewhere on the spreadsheet. Through the use of the GOTO com-









mand (the F5 key on the PC keyboard) and Range names in Lotus 1-

2-3, the user can gain immediate access to the documentation

anywhere on the spreadsheet. By giving the documentation text a

"Range" name, such as RAIN, the user only needs to strike the F5

key and type RAIN to move directly to that range, in this case,

the text called RAIN. This technique allows the data base

compiler to fully document all data without crowding within the

data table. This process can be further refined through the use

of the Lotus 1-2-3 macros.

Spatial Analysis and Data Distribution

Both main-frame and personal computer software are available

for contouring and distribution of spatial data, e.g., Sampson

(1978), Golden Software (1985). Several papers have been

published concerning the use of each type of data distribution

(Rouhani, 1985, Tabios and Salas, 1985, Creutin and Obled, 1982),

but informed judgment can often produce much better results when

dealing with complex data sets.

The results of various spatial analysis techniques can be

compared quite easily on an electronic spreadsheet. Although

more complicated distribution techniques, such as universal

kriging, are better left to the available PC software, several

data distribution methods for moderately sized study areas are

possible on the spreadsheet. An example of a distance-weighted
data distribution performed on the three raingages of the Cypress

Creek study is presented in Table 2. Several distance (D)
weighting formulas are available, such as l/D2 and 1/D3, but a


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