Group Title: Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla. ... annual session
Title: Folder 11
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WF00000005/00003
 Material Information
Title: Folder 11
Series Title: Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla. ... annual session
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Florida Chautauqua.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WF00000005
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of West Florida
Holding Location: University of West Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0778

Full Text






I ---THE-------


FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA

DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

TENTH H:NNU i L SESSION.


February 22cl to March 26th,


1893.


A Delightful Place. @ @
Good Hotel Acoomodations.
No I\Iosquitoes or MIalaria.


9 0 B


Excellent Drainage, Pure Water.


A Brilliant Programme, Eloquent Lectures, First-class nlusic.


C. H. HARRIS, President,
J.7 Ik-,er, AMich.


A. H. GILLET. Superintendent,
1I'ornin Ohio.


N. CULVER, Secretary,
De Funlak, Fla.


/


I ._


- --------------- --


"`~ -- - -- ----- -- --- --


I
''













THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


EXCURSION RATES FROM POINTS ON
THE -LOUISVILLE AND NASH-
VILLE RAILWAY.

Round trip tickets will be on sale at the fol-

lowing stations to De Funiak Springs from

February 18 to March 22, inclusive, and will be

good returning until April 10. Rates willbe as

follows:


Cincinnati............................ $25 00
Frankfort.................. ......... 24 00
Owensboro, Ky .... ... .. .......... 22 35
Lexington.......................... 24 00
Shelbyville............ ....... ......... 24 00
Louisville ................ ............ 22 25
Elizabethtown..... ............ ..... 22 25
Bowling Green .................... 22 25
Franklin, Ky ......................... 22 25
G allatin ................................ 21 25
N ashville.............................. 21 25
Franklin, Tenn......................... 21 25
Columbia ............... ............ 20 00
Pulaski. ............ .. ............ 18 70
- i r-. A1la.. ..... ................ 17 55
Decatur.............................. 17 00
New Decatur ...................... 17 00
Cullman ........................... 15 70
Blount Spring......................... 14 90.
Birmingham .......................... 13 55
Calera....................... ....... 12 30
Montgomery.......... ................ 9 75
Greenville ............. ............... 7 95
Georgiana ................. ........... 7 30
Garland........................... 7 00
Hopkinsville, Ky.......................... 22 25
Nortonville ................. ... ..... 22 25
Madisonville............... ........... 22 25
Henderson ........................ .. 22 25
Evansville, Ind ............ .... 22 25
Carmi, Ill................ ............. 23 75
Mt. Vernon........................... 25 00
----- -- - ............... ................ 25 00
St. L..ais, Mo.......... ........... 25 00
Campbellsville, Ky ................ 24 45
W etumpka, Ala....... ................ 10 60
Pleasant Hill ............... ....... 11 96
Flomaton .. ........... ..... ....... 4 74
Bluff Springs, Fla........... .......... 4 59
McDavid..................... ... .. 4 43
Pine Barron ..... .... .............. 4 24
Molino ............................... 4 11
Gravella................ ..... ..... 6 70


Evergreen .............. ........... $ 6 45
Castleberry...... .................... 6 05
Brewton.................. ........ 6 45
Pollard .............................. 5 15
Williams .......... ... ....... .. 5 55
Bay Minette ...... .................. 6 35
M obile ....................... ......... 7 35
Scranton.......... .................. 9 00
Ocean -.r;ni- ....................... 9 65
Biloxi ..... ..... ...................... 9 80
Mississippi City ....................... 10 15
Pass Christian. ...................... 10 70
New Orleans ........................... 13 00
Lebanon, Ky........................ 23 70
Junction City......................... 24 80
Owensboro ............... ............. 22 25
Glassgow........................... 23 25
Russellville ........................... 22 25
Guthrie .............................. 22 15
Clarksville, Tenn ...................... 22 70
Springfield............................ 21 40
Cantonment Junction.................. 3 88
Gonzales.. ......... .......... 3 80
Olive .................................. 3 63
Pensacola............................. 3 43
Milton............................... 2 73
Holts .......... ....... ......... 1 89
Milligan ............................ 1 59
Crestview................ .......... 1 42
Argyle ................................ 45
Ponce de Leon ............ ........... 70
Westville .......................... 96
Carryville............................ 1 05
Chipley .............................. 1 73
Cottondale ........................ 2 12
Mariana .............................. 2 49
Chattahoochee. ................ .......
I:' Ir Landing........ ................. 3 45
River Junction.................. ...... 3 52

Rates from Flomaton and Florida points in-
clude 25 cents admission.
Round trip tickets will be on sale February
18, till March 22, and will be good-to return
till April 10th.


J_
ittf


Chautauqua Circle.
(Literary and Scientific.)
A Definite Plan for Systematic
Home Reading.
AMERICAN-GREEK YEAR
1892-3.
Grecian History, Art and
Literature, America Diplo-
matic Relations,.the World's
Columbian E:.p.::sitlir. Etc.
Forty-five minutes a day and
75c.,a month are the time and
money required. Write for
details. Office C. L. S. C.,
Drawer 194, Buffalo, N. Y.


THE BURNS MANUFACTURING CO.,
BUILDERS OF-

IMPROVED ABSORPTION

Ice ant Rofripgratifn Machines.


ADDRESSES.


About the program write N. Culver. About
accommodations at De Funiah, or General
Assembly business, write N. Culver, De Funiak
Springs, Florida.

N. CULVER, C. H. HARRIS,
Secretary. President.


For Ice Making, Packing Houses, Cold Storage,
Creameries, Breweries, Hotels, etc.
Constructed on scientific principles, giving greatest
possible results at minimum cost. Reliable.
economical, easily handled and well
constructed.
Every Machine Guaranteed. Correspondence Solicited.
OFFICE, 827 EQUITABLE BUILDING,
ATLANTA, 4 GEORGIA.


EVERY FAMILY,
School, Library, and Office
S-H-O-U-L-D
Have a Didtionary.
Care should be taken to
GET THE BEST.
THE INTERNATIONAL,
New from Cover to Cover,
Successor of the "UNABRIDGED,"
IS THE ONE TO BUY.
10 years spent revising.
100 editors employed.
$800,000 expended.
Sold by WEBSTER'S
All Booksellers.
er INTERNATIONAL
Send to
G. & C. IERBIAI co. DICTIONARY
Publishers,
Springfield,Mass.,U.S A.
for free specimen pages.


I I L _




~el------- -------------------I


THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


DE FUNIAK SPRINGS.
Is located in Walton county, Western Flori-
da, on the Pensacola and Atlantic branch of
Louisville and Nashville Railroad. It was
founded some dozen years ago by Col. W. D.
Chipley, Mr. Thomas T. Wright, Mr. C. C.
Banfill, and others. It is now a village of 800
population with good general stores, several
fine hotels, excellent public graded school, two
beautiful churches and a large number of neat
and even elegant houses. It is the county seat
of Walton county and has good substantial
county buildings. The State Normal School
for whites is also located here and doing excel-
lent work. Altogether, though young, De Fu-
niak Springs is a vigorous and thriving village.

THE ASSEMBLY GROUNDS.
The grounds of the Assembly Association
surround a beautiful spring just one mile in
circumference, and as near a perfect circle in
form as can well be. The water is pure and
cold, and in some places the sounding line
shows a depth of eighty-four feet. From the
spring the ground gradually rises to the edge
of a basin about two hundred and fifty feet
from the water ; the outer circle being as near-
ly perfect in form as the spring itself. The
gentle slope between the crest of the hill and
the margin of the spring has been reserved as
a park. Within this park all the public build-
ings of the Assembly are located. Not far
away from the village, and within easy access
by rail or team. are some of the most interest-
ing places in Northern Florida. Tallahassee
and Pensacola, with their wealth of historical
associations; the outlook on the Gulf of Mexi-
co; the Scotch settlement just south of the vil-
lage, where for sixty-five years a large company
of Scotch Presbyterians have been located, and
have built up a thriving settlement; the rare
fishing grounds and oyster beds of the Gulf
coast; the famous Wakulla Springs; the Foun-
tain of Youth of Ponce de Leon; together with
many other remarkable and romantic places,
unite to make this a most interesting spot for
tourists and travellers.

LAKE OR SPRING ?
There it lies in the glorious sunlight of this
December day. The wind touches it and it is
flecked with silver. Now not a breath of air is
a-stir and within its clear calm surface the
green of the piue, the browns and reds of the
frost touched oak are reflected in astonishing
accuracy and beauty. Boats with pleasure
seekers pass brother and you over its surface.
Pagaents lend the gleam of Chinese lanterns
and colored fires to its beauty while fireworks
hiss along the shore. Music adds its charm as
it comes from the throats of the silver horns,
audl as we l,.ok ani list,:i it growu and ex-
panils, thi t f-thj:r -hoire Ie I. into .hadi..l.w
au, t, u- it is a i lk ai s iu ,lich :. any lak>: is i.
anyl,.,dy. It is a lIke


DR. A. H. CILLET.
It is with utmost sorrow we announce that
Dr. Gillet, soon after completing our program
for the coming session, passed from labor, to
rest and reward, at De Funiak January 1, 1893.
"The destruction that wasteth at noonday"
had for a year made unceasing progress. All
remedies seemed vain, but the manly struggle
against the inevitable went on through the
year. He was hopeful and cheerful, putting
into exercise all the evincing resources at com-
mand. His work was done, however, and so
earnestly and abundantly had he labored that
he reached rest all too soon.
For twenty-one years in the active ministry
or as agent of our Sunday-school Union, or as
a worker in Chautauqua assemblies, he has
been before the public in earnest ministration
for the good of others. We realize that ours is
not the only platform that will miss his genial
presence and masterly management, but that
the shadows fall on other assemblies as well.
It seems fitting that in this beautiful place so
restful and inspiring he should meet the bright
sunset of life in hope of a dawn that will never
be clouded by sorrow or followed by night.
The wife of his youth and three sons survive
him to mourn irreparable loss.
He had completed all arrangements for our
coming assembly, and while we shall feel the
absence of our brother and friend, it will be a
pleasure to pay tribute to his wisdom by exe-
cuitiLo hi-, l1 i.tns.


Now come to the very edge and look down,
how clear and calm and cool it seems. Dip
out some, hold your glass up to the sunlight,
see how clear it is. Taste and see how whole-
some. Now step into the boat there and we
row out to a place not far from the center.
Now look down, nothing to be seen but the
darkness of deep waters. We drop a line and
it sinks 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 feet or more be-
fore it finally rests on the bottom. Now wait
a minute, here comes a man of science, under
his arm a long bar with a glass at one end; he
sinks the box perpendicularly in the water and
now look down, there lies the bottom of pure
white sand, such as you have seen so many
times at the bottom of the big spring at the
old homestead. You can almost fancy you can
see the sand move under the influence of the
water, but the man of science says no, and re-
marks there's evidence of spring water action
over an area of more than 100 square feet. It
is just as the railroad man said, "It is a little
lake but a big spring."

THE DEPARTMENTS.
1.
MUSICAL-Dr. H. R. Palmer, Director.
SDr. Palmer is too well known to need an in-
troduction as composer, director, teacher and
musical critic. He has made for himself a
reputation that will endure. C'h iit.ii'u, -
everywhere know him as the lieadof the -.i:.lt
music college at Chautauqua, and we are most
fortunate in having him here. He will con-
duct two classes.
1. Chorus Class-It will meet on the taberna-
cle platform at 7 each evening for an hour of
thorough work under the accurate baton of
this prince of leaders.
2. St. A't-Re;. .a:: Class-This class affords an
opportunity for those who do not read music
or who read it imperfectly to become profi-
cient. Dr. Palmer is a magnetic, enthusiastic.
teacher with ideas and methods of his own.
Teachers would be well repaid by a careful
study of them in the class.
VOICE TRAINING-Madame Per Dahl, Teacher.
Madam Dahl is a singer of rare ability from
the land that gave us Wilson. She was edu-
cated musically in Berlin and Paris, spending
five years in the latter city working under th.
direction of the best masters. It is safe to sa:
that she understands and is fully competent to
use with skill and tact the very best methods
for building up and developing the voice. All
work will be done in private and terms can be
had by addressing Madam Per Dahl, De Funiak
Springs, Fla.
II.
ART.
FINE ART-Miss Lillian Eaton, of Erie, Penn.,

Mi- Eaton I. ii, hi'.hly re.-onnuleni.icdl a-
an exceilleut tn:hihe-r. She has enjoyed the best


I I `- I I --
















advantages for careful training and is thor-
oughly devoted to her chosen work. Pupils in
any of her classes will be satisfied with the
progress made under her instruction. Miss
Eaton will be prepared to teach drawing from
cast Elementary Drawing, Painting in Oil and
Water Colors, Portrait Painting and Sketching
from Nature.
Elementary Drawing, 24 lessons ..... 6 00
Drawing from Cast, 24 lessons....... 8 00
Portrait Painting, 24 lessons.........10 00
Painting in Oil or Water Colors, 24
lessons ....... .......... . . . 12 00

DECORATION ART-Mrs. J. Lawrence Hawks,
Sioux City, la., Teacher.
Mrs. Hawks is an expert in all kinds of dec-
orative art work. Her experience, tact and
enthusiasm should insure large classes from
the start. Her work will include painting on
chamois skin, bolting cloths, satin, etc. All


THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.

kinds of styles and designs of art embroidery
will be taught. Lessons in any department of
decorative art work will be given to classes or
private individuals.
Price per hour in classes of four or more .. 500
Price per hour to individuals ..............75c
Materials supplied at the studio.
CHINA PAINTING-Mrs. C. H. Harris, of Jack-
son, Mich., Teacher..
Much space is given in the leading art jour-
nals to the decoration of china by hand. Most
elaborate and beautiful designs are shown, and
in our cities some marvelous work is shown.
To be able to paint well on china is to possess
a never ending pleasure, while in many places
the work has become a lucrative one.
Mrs. Harris is a competent teacher and will
bring with her all material necessary for suc-
cessful work in her department. Terms will
be made known at the studio.


ID-Mr-rTAJZll -TTEfID


The forenoons of each day will be devoted to
class work, except on special days, when an-
nouncements of change in the regular order
will be made.
TENTH ANNUAL OPENING OF THE
FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.
4:30 P. M., WEDNESDAY FEB. 22d, 1893.
1. Vesper Service.
-'2. Pra t r.
3. Overture, Orchestra.
4. Addresses: President Harris, Dr. Palmer,
Dr. B. G. Northrop, Prof. H. N. Felkel
and others.
5. Selection: The Apollo Quartett.
6. Announcements.
7. Chautauqua Songs.
8. Benediction.

7 P. M.-First meeting of the Chorus Class,
Dr. R. H. Palmer, Director.
8 P. M.-Entertainment in honor of Wash-
ington's Birthday, by the pupils of
the Normal School, under the direc-
tion of Prof. H. N. Felkel, and Lan-
tern Parade by students of Normal and
Public School.
THURSDAY, FEB. 23, '93.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Dr. B. G. Northrop, L. L. D.,
Clinton, Conn; "Our Homes and
Towns."
7 P. M.-Chorus, Class; Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Concert by the AEolian Quartette of
Coldwater, Mich.
FRIDAY, FEB. 24, '93.
3 P. M.-Lecture, Rev. H. H. O'Neal: "The
French Revolution or the Tragedy of
History."
4P.M.----
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Lecture, Dr. B. G. Northrop, "The
Bible as an Educator."


SATURDAY, FEB. 25.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Samuel Phelps Leland;
"An hour at World's Building."
4 P. M.---
7 P, M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Reading: Miss Mary G. Scorer, Pitts-
burg, Penn.
SUNDAY FEB. 26.
9:30 A. M. Sunday School in the churches.
11 A. M.-Sermon: Rev. C. A. VanAnda, D.
D., Indianapolis, Ind.
5 P. M.-Chautauqua Vesper Service.
7 P. M.-Young people's meeting.
8 P. M.-Sermon: Pres. G. E. Ackerman,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
MONDAY FEB 27.
3 P. M.-Lecture, Rev. C. A. Van Anda, D. D.,
"Christianity as a Social Factor."
4 P. M.-
7 P M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 Select Dramatic Readings, Miss Mary G.
Scorer.
TUESDAY FEB. 28.
3 P. M.-Lecture, Rev. G. E. Ackerman, Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.; Mormanism Un-
veiled."
4 P. M.-
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Concert by the .Eolian Quartette. of
Coldwater. Mich.
WEDNESDAY MARCH 1.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Dr. G. W. Hubbard, M. D.,
Nashville, Tenn; "Healthy Homes."
4 P. M.-Lecture: Mrs. Eugenia Ackerman,

Chattanooga, Tenn.; "The Old and
New in Japan.
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Dr. E. K. Young, Akron, Ohio, "The
Possibilities of Life."


LANGUAGES.
FRENH--Madame Per Dahl, Teacher.
Madam Dahl speaks French like a native and
is an admirable teacher. There will be a class
for beginners and one for more advanced pupils.
Terms made known at the teachers room.
GERMAN-Miss Margaret Goetz, Teacher.
Miss Goetz comes to us a stranger from Chi-
cago, but is most highly commended, both as
a singer and teacher. Miss Goetz-will use the
famous natural method of instruction, the only
one which makes rapid acquirement possible.
Classes as follows:
1st. Beginners' conversation and gram-
mar combined, 3 lessons a week, term
of 5 weeks, tuition .................$ 6 50
2d. Intermediate class, 3 lessons a week
5 weeks, tuition ................. .$ 8 00
3d. Advanced class, 3 lessons a week,
term 5 weeks, tuition ................ $ 10 00
4th. Private 1 hour lessons, term4 for 10
lessons............................ $ 15 00



THURSDAY MARCH 2.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Rev. W. H. Puffer, Hastings,
Mich., The Spade and the Book."
4 P. M.-Dr. Geo. W. Hubbard; Care of the
sick."
8 P. M.-Lecture.: Dr. E. K. Young, Akron,
Ohio, "Pictures of Travel in the Old
World,"
FRIDAY MARCH 3.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Prof. Alcie Fortier, Tulane
University, New Orleans, La.; The
History and Literature of the Creoles
of Louisiana."
4 P. M.-Conference on above topics conduc-
ted by Prof. Fortier.
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R, H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-"An Evening with the Authors,"
Prof. Frank Domer, Ohio.
SATURDAY MARCH 4.
3 P. M.-Humorous and Dramatic Readings by
Frank Domer.
4 P. M.-Lecture, Prof. Alcie Fortier; "Louisi-
ana's Contribution to the Literature
of the South."
8 P. M.-Concert under the direction of Dr. R.
H. Palmer, assisted by Chorus Class,
Rogers Orchestra, Madame Per Dahl,
Miss A. Margaret Goetz of Chicago
and other soloists.
SUNDAY MARCH 5.
11 A. M.-Sermon.
5 P. M.-Chautauqua Vesper Service.
7 P. M.-Young People's Meeting.
8 P. M.-Sermon J. W. Peters, D. D.
MONDAY MARCH 6.
3 P. M.-J. W. Peters, D. D., Cincinnati, O.
4 P. M.-Prof. John P. Fruit, Ph. D., Russel-
ville, Ky.; "Elizibethan Literature;
Poetry-Spencer and Shakespeare."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.


I i~ _


L 'I ... I "L.I ::.-.-
















8 P. M.-Prof. J. C. Murry, Atlanta, Ga.; "The
Passion Play Illustrated by Stereopti-
con."
TUESDAY MARCH 7.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Rev. R. H. Traver, "Knight-
hood of To-day."
4 P. M.-Prof. John P. Fruit, Ph. D.; "Eliza-
bethan Literature; Prose--Hooker and
Bacon."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Prof. Jas. C. Murry; "In and about
Jerusalem; Stereopticon views."
WEDNESDAY MARCH 6.
3 P. M.-Lecture: Prof. J. W. Hancher, Black
Hills, S. D., "Success under difficul-
ties."
4 P. M.-Lecture:Prof. John P. Fruit, Ph. D.:
". Puritan Literature; Poetry-Milton."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M,--
THURSDAY MARCH 9.
3 P. M.-Prof. J. W. Hancher; "Your True
American."
4 P. M.-Lecture: Prof. John P. Fruit, Ph.
D.; "Puritan Literature; Prose-Thos.
Fuller, Jeremy Taylor, Sir Thomas
Brown and John Bunyan."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Lecture: Rev. R. B. Smith, Parkers-
burg, W. Va., "Diamonds from the
Dust."
FRIDAY MARCH 10.
3 P. M.-Rev. J. H. Taylor, D. D., Cincinnati,
Ohio.
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Rev. G. H. Peek, D. D., Brooklyn,
Ohio; "Master of the Situation."
SATURDAY MARCH 11.
3 P. M.--Rev. G. H. Peek, D. D., "American
Idiosyncracies."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Concert by Orchestra, Chorus Class
and specialists, under direction of Dr.
R. H. Palmer.
SUNDAY MARCH 12.
11 A. M.-Sermon: Dr. J. Le Roy Taylor.
4 P. M.-Chautsuqua V, -rt t Sri ih:e.
7 P. M.-Young People's Meeting.
8 P. M.-Sermon.
MONDAY MARCH 13.
3 P. M.-Lecture by Dr. C. E. Felton; "Har-
mony between Bible History and
Bible Lands."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.--Dramatized Reading of Geo. Elliot's
"Adam Bede," by Miss Mabel Biggert,
of New York, interspersed by contralto
solo by Miss Marie Louise Gumaer
(New York City) to carry on the theme.
TUESDAY MARCH 14.
3 P. M.-Prof. A. P. Borland, Ph. D., Nash-
%ille, i'tnau.; "'Il thl- Kiug's Hilghway."


THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.

4 P. M.-C. L. S. C. Round Table.
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Concert Apollo Quartette, Messrs. A.
J. Griffin, A. Faye, Wm. Rogers and
S. F. Root.
WEDNESDAY MARCH 15.
3 P. M.--
4 P. M:--Prof. A. P. Borland, Ph. D.; "Modern
Poetry; Burns, Bryant and Woods-
worth."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Dramatized Readine of General Lew
YYaiiace's 5 nen -tur," Dy IIss Maoel
I i.. 1, interspersed by appropriate
contralto solo by Miss Marie Louise
Gunaer.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16.
3 P. M.-
4 P. M.-Prof. A. P. Borland, Ph. D.; The
Story of an Idyl."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Lecture, Prof. A. M. Hammers, In-
diana, Penn.; Prof. Blarney Cartle to
Bonnie Doon." Illustrated by a series
of superb lantern views.
FRIDAY, MARCH 17.
3 P. M.-Lecture, Rev. G. T. Reynolds, Mans-
field Valley, Pa.; "The Making of a
Newspaper:"
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Lecture, Prof. A. M. Hammers; "From
Paris to Pompeii." Illustrated.
SATURDAY, MARCH 18.
3 P. M.-Lecture, Rev. Carter Helm Jones.
8 P. M.-Concert, under Direction of Dr. R. H.
Palmer.
SUNDAY MARCH 19.
11 A. M.-Rev. Carter Helm Jones.
5 P. M.-Chautauqua Vesper Service.
7 P. M.-Young People's Meeting.
8 P. M.-Sermon by Rev. John L. Forbes, D.
D., of Deland, Fla.
MONDAY, MARCH 20.
3. P. M.-Lecture, Prof. J. W. A. Wright, Lex-
ington, Ala.; "The Story of DeSoto."
7 P. M.-Chorus Class, Dr. R. H. Palmer.
8 P. M.-Lecture: J. L. Forbes, D. D.

PROGRAMME OF THE FLORIDA STATE
TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.
TUESDAY MARCH 21.
9:00 o'clock, A. M.-1. Address of Welcome:
Superintendent of the Florida Chau-
tauqua Association.
2. Response: Hon. A. J, Russell, Ex-
State Superintendent of Public In-
struction.
3. The I'r.i.iIdett' Annual Address:
Prof. Geo. P. Glenn.
4. Report of Advisory Board: H. N.
Felkel, Secretary.
lI terming iin.


2:00 o'clock P. M.-Meeting of the County
Superintendents. Subject: County
Supervision." To be discussed by Hons.
N. B. Cook, of Escambia; M. L. Payne,
of Marion, and C. A. Carson, of Osceola.
The meeting of the County Superin-
tendents will be in charge of the follow-
ing officers: Hon. W. N. Sheets, State
Superintendent of Public Instruction,
President; Hon. M. L. Payne, Vice-Presi-
dent; Hon. Shelton Phillips, Secretary.
Intermission.
8:00 o'clock- P. M.-Address: Emerson E.
White, LL. D., Cincinnati, followed by
General Reception and Re-union in
charge of a committee, consisting of
Mrs. Dr. Judge, Mrs. H. K. Ingram and
Mrs. M. L. Veinfleit.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 22.
9:00 o'clock, A. M.-Address: "The Trinities
in Education," Dr. E. E. White, Cincin-
nati.
10:00 o'clock.-" The Teaching of English
Grammar," President T. W. Melton, of
Florida Conference College.
10:30 o'clock.-Is Teaching a Profession? If
not, why not? Miss CeDora Lieuellen.
To be followed by discussion.
Intermission.
2:00 o'clock, P. M.-" How to En, ., a.,i.- Local
Institute Work," Hon. R. M. Ray, of
Pasco county. To be discussed by Hons.
C. E. L. Allison, J. C. Compton and S.
Phillips.
Intermission.
8:00 o'clock P. M.-Address : "Carriage and
Bearing," by Mrs. F. A. Parker, Chicago.

THURSDAY MARCH 23.
9:00 o'clock, A. M.-Address: "Ethical Train-
ing," by Dr. E. E. White.
10 to 10:30,-" County and State Civics," Prof.
J. P. Selman, of Pensacola. To be dis-
cussed by Prof. J. E. Kemp, of St.
John's Academy, Madison, and Miss
Fannie McFadden, Principal Mikesville
Public School.
11:00 to 12:00 o'clock.-Address: "Artist or
Artisan," which? Col. F. W. Parker,
Chicago.
2:00 o'clock P. M.-Election of officers for the
next year.
8:00 o'clock P. M.-Address: "The Child," by
Col. Francis A. Parker, Chicago.

FRIDAY.
Excursion to Pensacola.

SATURDAY MARCH 26.
8. P. M.-CLOSING CONCERT, under direction of
Dr. Palmer, as.ikr.l by Roger's Orches-
tra, th- C'hurus Class anum Soloists.


'4:


_I II I I I - -- ,













THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


OUR MUSICIANS.
R. R. H. PALMER, MUSICAL DIRECTOR.
Of this gentleman as musical director, com-
poser and musical critic, it is hardly necessary
to speak. His name is in every home, while
his popularity at De Funiak Springs was almost
unprecedented, while his musical qualities, his
geniality and friendliness make him popular
everywhere. We hope to have a chorus for
him this year of more than 200oo voices.
MISS AUGUSTA MARGERT GOETZ.
Mezzo soprano. Miss Goetz sang an engage-
ment through the season at Chautauqua, New
York last summer and was very popular. Of
a second effort of hers in Chicago a leading pa-
per says: "Her stage presence is quite capti-
vating in its simple grace; her voice is sweet
and thoroughly under control; she uses it with
excellent effect." That she will be popular at
the Assembly there can be no doubt. She is
one of the best singers we have ever been able
to bring to De Funiak, except for especial occa-
sions.
SOPRANO.
Madame Per Dahl, though now a resident of
De Funiak Springs, she is not announced for
any service that she does not fill the building
where she sings. She sings equally well in
German, Italian and French, and is thoroughly
Tf irilji, wili rj masters, Her lessons in voice
culture should be amongst the most popular
features of our class work."
Supplemental to assist and strengthen the
chorus and assist the soloists when necessary
we have the splendid organization known as
Roger's Band and Orchestra for several years
past, they have full term engagements at
Chautauqua and are doing not a little at other
large and popular assemblies.
Miss Misourie Cawthon, a young lady of
fine stage presence, excellentvoice and style,
will add not a little to the enjoyment of the
assembly by her solos and duets.
Miss Victoria Hulse, who has acted as our
organist in other years is of great assistance
to the musical manager in her willingness to
sing when wanted, and always popular with
the audience because of the freshness of her
----- voice and the sincere gentle ring.
THE APPOLO QUARTETTE.
A new male quartette organized at De Funiak
Springs during the year and already very
popular. The club consists of Mr. F. S. Root,
A. J. Griffin, Wm. Rogers, A. Faye. The
quartette are to give at least one full concert
during the session.
ACCOMPANIST.
Mrs. S. F. Battle, of Chicago, a thoroughly
trained and competent musician will preside
at the piano.


Ji~T
0D _







~Ci~ -



8=002
~:U j




C"Em~t


HOTEL




CHAUTAUQUA

ALL OF THE MODERN IMPROVEMENTS.


BATH -+ ROOM
With Hot and Cold Water.

--..-----LmnEV UNDYE:, EBT.--------

Rates, $2.00 and $2.50 Per Day.

For rooms and special rates write or
enquire of
A. J. GRIFFIN, Proprietor,
De Funiak Springs, Fla.



CHAUTAUQUA 1893.

Make Chautauqua Your Headquarters
for the Summer of 1893,

And Make the Trip to the World's
Fair From There.

Living is cheap at Chautauqua. It is a delightfully
cool place. The attractions ate many. Prof. Henry
Drummond and many other foreign guests, as well as
famous Americans, will lecture. There will be fine
music and no end of entertaining things. A magnifi-
cent new amphitheatre and a complete sewer system
will be ready in 1893. Write for all details to
W. A. DUNCAV, Secretary,
Syracuse, N. Y.


OUR LECTURERS.
Among the list presented in this paper our
friends will recognize some old acquaintances
among them Dr. B. G. Northrop, of Conn.,
who was so much help to us in the early days.
Dr. E. K. Young, the vivacious, black-eyed
Irishman who talked to us so entertainingly
about St. Patrick, and we expect Dr. Earl
Cranston, of the Methodist Book Concern,
whom everyone enjoys. Dr. George Hubbard,
of Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.,
will be here to spend an indefinite time with
us, talking in his entertainir g way on scien-
tific subjects. Most of the men, however, are
new. There is Rev., LeRoy Taylor and Dr.
Henry M. Curtis, a pair of young Presbyterian
ministers, sinewy, vigorous, and at times
brilliant, whom everybody will be glad to
know.
Prof. Alcie Fortier, genial, sweet spirited
and a thorough scholar; it will be a blessing
to take his hand and hear his voice. There is
the broad shouldered Kentuckyan, Prof. J. P.
Fruit, who talks wisely and well on English
literature. The .-rli.il. pleasant faced A. P.
Borland, Sec. of Monteagle Assembly, also, a
professor in Nashville Normal College. Time
and space would fail to tell of Hammers, the
stereopticon lecturer, or Murry, who is to talk
to us about the Passion Play, with stereopticon
illustrations of Dr. Ackerman and wife of,
Grant University, Chattanooga; of O'Neal,
Smith, Peake and Reynolds, who tells us about
"making of a newspaper." There are many
others yet to be secured.
OUR READERS.
Six evenings this year will be given to elocu-
tionary entertainments. But they will be
unique in character and quite different from
anything we have had hitherto.
The first will be given by Miss Mary G.
Scorer, who will be remembered by some as
the sister of Prof. John G. Scorer, President
of the Cleveland School of Oratory. Miss
Scorer has developed excellent histrionic abili-
ties, while her genuine irish nature make her
almost a genuine comedienne.
Following the entertainments of Miss Scorer
will be two by Mr. Frank Domer, Professor of
Oratory in Scio College, Ohio Mr. Domer is
a most diligent and conscientious student and
likes most of all to being out in an evening's
entertainment, some masterful idea of some
great author or a series of them, and we shall
most certainly enjoy Mr. Domer.
The concluding entertainments, two in num-
ber, and will be given by Miss Mabel Biggert,
of Philadelphia, assisted by Miss Marie Louise
Gunaer.
Miss Biggert will give two dramatized read-
ings and adaptations from the works of Geo.
Shiller, George Elliott, Victor Hugo, George
W. Cable and others. Miss Gunaer will assist
during the evening by vocal selections. She
is possesed of a rich, sympathetic contralto
voice. We have hardly ever had greater rich-
ness and variety in our elocutionary depart-
ment than this year.


OF-- ww--


- ii I I I r I I
















AMERICAN


BOOK


COMPANY

Publishers of School

and College Text Books.

ENGLISH CLASSICS FOR SCHOOLS.
An important new series.
Literary Standards in attractive durable form at
lowest possible prices:
Macaulay's Second Essay on the Earl of Chatham.. $ 20
The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers from the Spec-
tator.... .. ... ....... .................... ... 20
Scott's Ivanhoe..................................... 60
Scott's Marmion (In press.) .....................
Irving's Sketch Book-Selections................. 20
Shakespeare's Julius Casar ....................... 20
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night... ................. 20
LEADING TEXTS FOR COMMON SCHOOLS.
Appleton's School Readers.....................
Swinton's Readers.............................
New Graded Readers. .............................
Sanders' New Readers .............................
Swinton's Word Primer............................$ 15
Swinton's Word Book.......................... 18
Spencerian Copy Books, Revised ...................
Appleton's Standard Penmanship................
ROBINSON'S ARITHMETIC:
New Primary ....................................$ 18
First Book ....... ............ .. .......... ... 30
New Rudiments.. ............................. ...30
N ew Practical .................................... 65
Complete.... ... ....... ........ .. .... 75
New Table Book............. .................... 18
APPLETON'S STANDARD GEOGRAPHIES:
Elementary ................... ........ .........$ 55
Higher .................................. 1 25
Physical ............................. ... 1 60
Swinton's Primary Geography................... 54
Introductory Geography ................. 55
Elementary Geography .................... 80
Grammar School Geography............. 1 25
Swinton's Language Primer ................... 28
Swinton's New English Grammar and Composi-
tion ........................... ............... 76
Harvey's Practical English Grammar ............. 65
Barnes' Primary U. S. History.................... 60
Barnes' Brief U. S. History ........................ 1 00
Swinton's Condensed U. S. History................ 90
PATHFINDER PHYSIOLOCIES:
No. 1 Childs Health Primer ....................... $ 30
No. 2 Hygienie for Young People................. 50
No. 3 Hygienie Physiology...................... 1 00
Smith's Primer of Physiology and Hygiene....... 30
Smith's Elementary Physiology...................
Webster's Primary School Dictionary, new Edition 48
Webster's Common School Dictionary, new Edi-
tion.............. ... .... .. 72
Webster's High School Dictionary, new Edition.. 98
Books sent postpaid on receipt of price-specially
favorable terms for introduction. Descriptive List,
Sections, Circulars and Price Lists free. For the latest
and best texts in every branch of school study always
consult the


AMERICAN


BOOK


COMPANY
New York, Cincinnati, Chicago,
Boston, Atlanta.


THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.

FRUIT AT DE FUNIAK.

When this region was first opened to settle-
ment, some very rose colored prophecies were
indulged in by those most interested in build-
ing up the locality. Those prophecies have
been in a large measure fulfilled and as one
looks over the hundreds of acres of orchards of
vigorous and thrifty trees one can hardly be-
lieve that six years ago there was hardly a tree
in all this section.
Last July an exhibit was held which was in
every way a credit to the place. The following
brief description is from the Pensacola News :
The first fruit exhibit held under the
auspices of the Fruit Growers' Association ex-
ceeded all expectations.
The opera house was crowded at an early
hour; the fruit and vegetables were taste-
fully arranged. A stalk of green tobacco four
feet high, raised by Mr. George Tervin, created
considerable comment.
The entrance of Mr. Shugart carrying a four
foot limb bearing no less than 56 Leconte pears
was hailed with loud applause. Mr. Shugart
also distributed samples of his California seed-
ling grapes from seeds planted four years ago.
Anything more beautiful than the fruit dis-
play cannot be conceived. The collection com-
prises peaches, ranging from deep golden yel-
low to rose color and crimson; there were Kel-
sey plums as large as goose eggs, from the
semi-ripe to the full ripe, in their glossy blue
brown coats; mammoth Leconte and Keiffer
.pears; apples from Col. W. J. D. Cawthon's
farm near Lake View, Ala., whose superiors
could not be found even in Michigan, the great
apple country. Of grapes there was the deli-
cate green Niagaras, light red Delawares, pur-
ple Concords and leves seedlings. Water-
melons and pumpkins weighing 45 to 50 pounds
were plenty.
Though called a "fruit" exhibit, several en-
terprising folks sent vegetables now in season,
sweet potatoes as big as quart measures and
tomatoes 12 and 13 inches in circumference.
The small fruits were strawberries, figs, and
"ever bearing" blackberries.
Interesting addresses on fruit culture were,
at the request of President Colver, given by
the Rev. C. E. Felton, the Messrs. Faye, Cook,
Everett and Hollowell. According to these
experienced horticulturists, the Elberta and
St. John Peaches.are to be preferred above all
others for this section. Dr. Felton reported
success with cherries, a fruit hitherto supposed
unsuitable for this locality.


Having purchased the large stock of General
Merchandise from Chas. Everett, combined with
our present stock, and new goods we are receiv-
ing daily, enables us to
OFFER BARGAINS
unsurpassed by any merchant in Walton Co.
An extra session of Congress is unnecessary,
as we have already marked our goods below the
TARIFF SCHEDULE.
We will treat you you fairly and honestly, for
the Goose Still Hangs High at the Brick Store.
JOHN CHISHOLM & CO.

D. CAMPBELL, J. A. McLEAN.
Attorney at Law. Clerk Cir't. Court
zcttip6erf & Mcl.eatt
Will give special attention to the assess-
ing and payment of taxes and collecting
of rents.


WM. Ilea ns & e
Manufacturers and Dealers In
DRESSED LUMBER,
MOLDINGS, DOORS,
SASH, BLINDS, WINDOW and DOOR FRAMES,
SCROLL SAWING, &c.
1Building Contractors
Vans and Sp,:i..::,:,.r:: : iish~---

DR. A. LANDRUM,
-DEALER IN-

DRUGS;?;: DIa:, AND rnz mi ra ul
Fancy, Goods, Stationary and School
Supplies.




IS NOW OPEN.
-We keep a FIRST-CLASS HOTEL. Everything-
-comfortable and home-like. For special rates-
--by the month or season write
J. C. SCOTT,
DeFuniak, Fla.
-WHEN YOU WANT A--
SEAL, STENCIL,
RUBBER STAMP

Or INE PADS, &c.,
-WRITE TO-
ATLANTA RUBBER STAMP & STENCIL WORES
31 SOUTH BROAD ST. ATLANTA, GA.

Fr fM. 1F AUCK,
DBKnLtiR IN
Wall and Building Paper, Painters supplies. Etc.
Samples Sent. Fresco and Paper Decorater.
29 East Hunter St., ATLANTA, GEORGIA.


...J


"FlIMP


"-~bl- . --













THE FLORIDA CHAUTAV:QTUA.


SOUTHeRN

SHORTHAND AND BUSINESS
COLLEGE
57 S. Broad St., Atlanta, Ga.
"F e R 0 SHORTHAND
FOLI EGES C072WmE1RCInL
LL2 TGLEGR-c PHY
*1N NEN PEN 7RT
EQUAL TO ANY IN THE U. S.
RBFBRBNOCBS.-
Gov. W. J. Northen says: "It gives me pleasure to com-
mend the work your Business College is doing. -Your pupils
are well trained, skilful and trustworthy."
Sen. Colquitt says: "I take pleasure in commending your
College. My son was a student and.derived much benefit."
Sen Jno. B. Gordon says : "I commend in strong terms
the qualifications of your pupils, whom I have employed."
Sen. Jos E. Brown says: "All that I know of your Busi-
ness College is favorable. Your pupils discharge their duties
well and faithfully."
W. A. Hemphill, Mayor Atlanta.
Jno. T. Glenn, Ex-Mayor.
E. P. Howell, Manager Constitution.
Every State House Officer, Atlanta.
Dorsey, Brewster & Howell, Attorneys.
B. W. Wrenn, G. P. A. E. T., V. & G. R. R.
Central R. R. Officials.
Rev. J. B. Hawthorne, D. D.
Rev. Henry McDonald, D. D.
Rev. J. W. Lee, D. D.
Rev. E. H. Barnett, D. D.
Treasurer Home Mission Board.
Baptist Home Mission Board.
F. E. Block, Atlanta.
rGndvear & Kay, Brunswick.
lu.l.-: W. T. Newman, U. S. Court.
LAR3OE ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT FREE.
FACULTY.
r. Br.: .:. M njn er and Senior^h..rh-ll
I i .A.. .. .-\. Manager and .,..lor 'h-'rtt4 arL. ,
1-,. 1.i L I. 1 ..i ., Jun. Shorthand and Typewriting.
1. I r. BowEN, Jun. Shorthand and Typewriting.
P R .1 rE, Bookkeeping, Mathematics, &c.
Si .!.- L:LAN, Bookkeeping, Commercial Law, Penmanship
H ilE ., Telegraphy.
F I. .*'.GLEY, Pen Art.

CHURCH DEDICATION.
The new Methodist church at this place will
he dedicated on Sunday, February 12th, Bishop
Thomas Bowman, of St. Louis, officiating.
T hi edifice would be a credit to any city. It
ik irndl.eol, "a thing of beauty," and our citi-
zens fully appreciate it.
RAILROAD NOTES.
The Louisville and Nashville Railroad has
made low rates to De Funiak and return from
all points on its line. Full information will be
found in another column. Those desiring
sleeper accommodations through to De Funiak
leave Cincinnati at 8 p. m. From St. Louis De
Funiak passengers should take the night train.
Address C. P. Atmore,,G. P. A., Louisville,
Kentucky.
From Chicago the most direct route is via
the Chicago and Eastern Illinois, leaving Chi-
cago at 4 p. m. and reaching Nashville in time
for the morning train South on the Louisville
and Nashville Railway. For rates address
Charles L. Stone, Chicago, Ill,
From Toledo and Michigan points the route
is by the C. H. and D., one of the best equipped
and best managed roads in the land. For time
tables and other information address E. O.
McCormick, G. P. A. Cincinnati, Ohio.


7 7 TSTERFPIBECF
OF HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE LITERATURE IS


JUDIA AND MALAYSIA
BY BISHOP J. M. THOBEUN, D. D.
SUPERBLY ILLUSTR RTTED.*
SUPERBLY PRINTED,
-ri SU FRBL BOUND"
ROYAL OCT'VO0. Z. PAGES.
Tr r]. Elir!..i. I Ithi. 1.1 1;! .i; 1es, postpaid $2.00.
Sui... ril|.ri.. Lh i ..,!. H I:.,- -,. inarbled edges, $2.50,
'iui.i. r-lrl.i. E ihr,.h, F'It I:-..... gilt edges, $3.00.
I= iAgents n !,r.. r....- 11. rIl- subscription edition of
this splendid t.. !:: L I..- ri i t i'ms. Territory free.
Addrei". CRANSTON & CURTS,
I.: V1 f,.I,,t r .1 ninati, 0.






-- I I rn i

oI,.
I' -'.--. -- -



Dry Gods, Hats,




Shoes, Fine Groceries,


CONFECTIONERY AND FRUITS.

De Funiak Springs. Florida,


.... J .... -i y

WATCHMAKER
A.xzacl. Uerweel.e.

C. E. THOMi1P'SON, M. D., NI.
L. X. Q. C. P. Dublin, Ireland.

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
( 'l',. nr..l FIR- ,-J..-.: LIVE OAK AVENUE.


J. HI KRUSE,

lumisr, Pip' itltr ani Sheet Metal Morkor.

Private Water Works, Wind Mills, Pumps, Tanks, Etc.

Tin and Iron Roofing, and Galvanized Iron
Cornice Work.-
Estimates Furnished on Application.


From Central and West Michigan points the
Grand Rapids and Indiana Railway brings pas-
sengers i'to the Louisville and Nashville sta-
tion in Cincinnati, making close connection
with trains for De Funiak Springs. Full infor-
mation can be had by addressing C. L. Lock-
wood, G. P. A., Grand Rapids, Mich.
The new I; Illin.'li and Ohio train between
'-iii iuillti. W .it-1i, t'..t.ij ani .l NV" Yolk ia a
l.,;.it lv l. N 'IV I ll .in ..it, .- f th. li : ltest p11t.
le u t+.l tm .-- t ..,.i n, a -h1i[,ri .-,|. ,i:.l. w ith
n*li' v .,t r.'hi,: h + ,,i I I e -,,in..l l ti l iel. ft-Iftv
I',;.II[l 1 dii l 1 in l.':!! ar i l I. tln ir. Ie v ,il-. i idl
I:hi. .>.t rize thi i .,.' rinin.-vur P l.ii -i nt. A. l-
hi,..- .'h ,. I 1.. n111l, IA l tim r M I. 1)D.
F .,-i riri int. .l nri l at I ".,- t hei FI l..,l i ,l ,
tr... i [i* F ii, i k .t-1,ii[r.-. ti I* ist r,:iiti: i. ly
Ihlv Fl..il .li ulti.,l 1 Pi:; i ii..il.,r L iil ay.
TKie niin, tr.in li. i De Ftii.ik !.i tro.h
Si.I tl ., L '.u ~ t .T ro Fnvile. K whi
iFUR. ik..N,, '-,.,v I be, tr l tht- Mr. Dora. A-
A.nli .AEv hillng Kept iln a-ititlll

.i l r.. Ai I Fl. Mi .i l, .. k-...t ili ,


THiE o an f't iMt snoIf ).t ItmN..u
lry F. l *. I-. EI.,I general supply till isore,

Only charge for goods ._. scenery gralitisi
tNow good di..nt .t A... waiting. rn appetite.
uI .. 'I per i.l. i . S i i.i r.1 in aD .ll:u t (.ni
6.1, in e fr iodu03 \v ck ... lr.,tlih at le-
IlI. ... I'r.t, '.
The Ni-w Y,,rk []oi.i. i.uIh'l- thlr in.liu:'.-
Inil t l .1 C .'. '-.:'t -.: lf.n :,r dlIy kt...w D i1;
N,-wv Y,.,rk C jh: u.ii. ui, .1i-,, I'l'e Allebh.li-nVL-V
I-l,.,ii. t, ii/- I,,eu ri-ht eil tiui1 ft',,rt li. ,, is tiuu _r
tih- lnl:lh .. -,!Uni:lt -- I'|l...n|ilp ,, alljo tl,.>n
tl,, Iv 1' .1 Io. ,,ly n i l.e r t I.it f.n is h > x l.
--, IIt I l l ilu L.d I ,'s ;uIt r'..i > .>ln le ra .. .
ti,:_ ,' l l: l il li:i d b tt. .:2 ; flQ'I I':i.i.:'ini I L i \ i f-
h i Il II,.r-! ...du-.*l --ir[ilg to I..'.. th nln-th -.
T o .:M',.' .i.i..i ,inii: ati, n- in ,,,.il u ,:.e \vre te
i- ,,.,r,.I in iu g. _-t- ,,>'t N '.u iver.. .-'< . l>;l l'\ ,,f
thl.. <'LIL i:.lt iLtbl.i e A tlll.,lV .



King, King & Co.
I]EA.D,-LIAkTEF,- Fi,-R

FURNITURE,
And Everything Kept in a
GENERAL STORE.
SECOND BLOCK EAST OF DEPOT.

hlurida, F:Iir Florida.
Come to De Funiak Sp'gs for health.
Eating is essential to good health.
'All you can get is not too much,
Try F. C. Eaton's general supply store,
Only charge for goods,, .scenery gratis.
Now good digestion wait on appetite.


- I I


---- r I I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs