Group Title: Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla. ... annual session
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Title: Folder 10
Series Title: Florida Chautauqua, De Funiak Springs, Fla. ... annual session
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Florida Chautauqua.
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Bibliographic ID: WF00000005
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of West Florida
Holding Location: University of West Florida
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Full Text





Detailed


Prograrmme


- -:-
"'.3


12tL) (qn)ual
Session .'.*.


February 20
March 18 ,'."
18%96 ---


.'-- ,". :T ,J
' -.--(.I( iOiDAA ("HALTAQUA '
,., L \ I . .' 3. /




SDeFuriak SPi ... '9
Ji-- -=-4 : -- yEP2;+7-. I f ,' + ::i- M ,


I., A .'. '.
H-on. n.lla'ce Ir'ce.,


T. F. Mci- ourin.


Dr. 1. L. Davidson,
t_ ,t 1'. "',, /-, ..' -L .


)9~T


Ii j II' I' I I 'I III
i ', 't







T-. [ L(QDA CIAUTAI(J).i


\\' H. KNO'.VLES. J. S. LBONARD. V. K. H\ ER.
Si,:-f. -Pres! e. C(_ '.', r. n .-Ca>,'/.- .: ,.


First NatioOal BanV_ _
11111b OF PENSACOLA, FLA.


Directors: --? Wmi. H. Knowles, W. A. Blount, F. C. Brent,
Dr trs:- D. 0. Brent, J. S. Leonard.


W. K. Hyer, Jr.,


G ,e* FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC EXCHANGE BOUGHT AND SOLD, o1


WHEN VISITI6jHE' T
SHEN lHAUTAUQUA CITY
Don't forget when wanting a Good
Turn-out to call at
DeFUNIAK STABLES
FINEST TEAMS AND SERVICE.

S JI, CAWTHON, Prop.
bEFUNIAKRSPRINGS, FLA.

DON'T FORGET THE

Brick Store
NEW STOCK,
NEW FIXTURES,
NEW PRICES,-.
-Everything Moderr).-
Courteous and Prompt Attention.
.LA. L. = 3OC:'E-s ,
DBPUNIAK SPRINGS. PLA.

THOSE, C WATSON,

OF PENSACOLA. FLA.


WEBL' ESTATE DEBLEB
Has For Sale Large Tracts of
SH0C FRUIT AND,
HOICE FARM LAND.
Write Him for Prices, Terms, etc.

F. E. WILSON
WlTCO-JIKER 0i JEWELER
Bicycle Repairing a Specialty.
Over City Market, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.


S Seeking a -
VI ii / I uIet ~-olme-like place
will make no mistake
S U. A i M# -, tr..-.[.;... at the


All6glli6nu
tII ou OUf.


EVERYTHING NEW.
PRICES RE ,SONABLE.
LOCATION SUPERB.

G-. THOMPSON, Prop.
I'EFr NIAK C ,r'i:;.--. FLA.


WILLIUII DREYER,
ARCHITECT.
F..! Sp'c .iAlI n of Local Architectural
Work see
Presh3 teriar Church,
Residences of E. H. Davis,
T. J. Sherman and others.

TERMS REASONABLE.


Laird, Laird & Co.
General
Merchandise.
New store, new stock, and rock
bottom prices. Your intereIst
is ours. Give us a trial.
Free delivery.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS; FLA.


WM, ROGERS & Co,
I *-"*
l lomn i)
. .... ...



-.Lcalr in Lr-ry'lh'- l? 1..r House-Building.
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.

FLORIDA STATE NORMAL COLLEGE
1885- DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 1896.
F O R the P'. ,-.ir...... [. i r. 'u r.. .....
adapted t(. rti- Ir i,,,.-u.-,.r. .t rl.. -i ..r..l ....,
Graded for t.- .... r .:: .:r-. .I t.!l,,,v :
"D" G ,L.. -O,.- year for Second and Third
Grade C ri.rr: :
"C" GRADE.-One ear for Firqt Grade Certifi-
cates.
"B" AND "A" GRADES.-For State Certificates.
TTIlr..n Ir .6,1 I ,,1 l.. r. '. r. I t r ..I.to i b-
; -Ii..' Jn i, f i i . ,i- rl t .el'l ..
, Th,,r..i lj >.. ,rl i.'h l' ,IU l.. ,' tr .1 t -' H e[ al-
th. -:.:.f.. I ;..i.r .-', I '" i....l t:' .i,, rch
F.r t' r i rr r rr|..r i. i i. r i.. ,i ri- oj.l.iy to
REV. C. P. WALkER, A. M.. President.
L. Hilton Green. Pres. T. E. Welles, Vice-Pres.
R. N4. Bu-hnell, Cashier.

Tie Ciizenis )aiio ai Ba nk
OF PENSACOLA,
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA.
DIRECTORS:
T. E. Welels
S JohnF t't[irt'..!. i'. i Heinberg.
* ; *,. e-. W. Wrntb. it. K.J. Whitmire.
Rix M. '...l.;. ... Morris Bear.
L. Hii..i Green.
Correspondince Solicited.

S. BE. W: OLF
cash buyer of

ides, Furs, Etc.,
Express Office, DeFunial Springs. Fla.


F. C. BRENT.
P,*,J* !.


I
















/


The-Florida Chautauqua.


.-.... DeFuoiak Springs, Fla., February 20 to Marcb 18, 1896.----


A CHAUTAUQUA IN THE WILDS OF WESTERN FLORIDA.
AN HISTORICAL SKETCH BY GEN. GEO. B. LOUD.


T'HE garden spots of America are a never-ending theme.
Like the stars in heaven, they are numerous. Like
the stars also, they do but outshine and overshadow each
other in glory. No one who has ever visited the Yellow-
stone Park, or from an open car has witnessed the awful
grandeur of the Grand Canyons of Colorado, or, coming
closer home, has viewed the magnificent scenery of the
majestic Iludson River or the Adirondacks, but will ap-
preciate that this is a great, a beautiful country.
But enough of this.
My subject is Chau- """ .... .-.
tauqua. Even the
word is an inspira-
tion. Especially ..,
shall I treat of the '
FloridaChautauqua-
-reclaimed from a '::'
howlingwilderness,
a veritable garden .-" : ..
of the gods. '- .' :. '
Less than fifteen ;-,,
years ago, arailway -"
surveyingparty
carrying not only
theinstrumentsand
tools necessary to
the prosecution of
their plans, but
armed for bear and
other game that
might be met with,
and provisions as
well, started east
from Pensacola and
plunged into the
then almost track-
less wilderness of
Florida. Their ob-
ject was the laying
out of a line of road '' .. ': ''
which would form a ; .
connecting link be- .. :
tween the western P,'
or Gulf coast coun-
ties of the State *. :
and middle Florida,
Jacksonville and THE ARION LAC
other points on the Atlantic coast.
The opening up of the country through which the road
must pass was not then considered a matter of importance.
Quite the contrary, for notwithstanding the fact that a
small colony of hardy Scotch settlers had located in the
southern part of Walton County and engaged in sheep rais-
ing and agriculture with success, it was generally con-
sidered that that particular county was no credit to the rest
of the State and the less known about it the better.


Now and then some reckless capitalist, with the ambition
to pose as a large real-estate owner, invested in a few hun-
dred or a few thou-and acres, as the case might be, of West-
ern Florida land. This he secured at his own price. He
afterwards invariably regretted that he had not paid five
times as much and taken one-fifth the acreage somewhere
else, as the more of that land a man possessed the poorer
he was considered to be.
In an address delivered at the llth annual assembly of
the Florida Chau-
5- .tauqua, Hon. W. D.
Chipley related an
anecdote which is a
fair sample of the
S stories in circula-
S '- tion about that sec-
: -'.tion of our country
S in the early days.
SIt appears that a
Y. gentleman who had
bought a large tract
of Walton County
land determined,
i against the advice
and entreaties of
friends, to visit his
possessions. After
encountering innit-
merable hardships,
he at last stood upon
his own domain and
looked around for a
sign of life. Sud-
denlyhe espied a go-
pher going into his
hole. Having the
deed of his land in
Shis pocket, the own-
r er drew it out and,
stepping to the en-
trance of the go-
pher's cave, thrust
in the deed, saying,
"Take it, you are
the oldest citizen."
Y QUARTETTE, But how things
arechanged Some
of the garden spots of the peninsular State were destined to
be penetrated by this railroad; projected by Hon. W. D.
Chipley in February, 1881, and under process of construction
in July of that year, its speedy completion shortened the dis-
tance by rail between New Orleans and the capital of Flo-
rida very many miles, and to points in East Florida over
one hundred and fifty miles.
It was a bright morning in May, 1881, when the survey-
ing party referred to came to a halt near a small round


II II I









4 THE PLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.
i:


pond in the heart of the forest. The beauty of the spot at
once impressed itself upon all who beheld it. Here in the
depths of the piny woods at the southern spur of the Blue
Ridge Mountains as they come sweeping down from the
Carolinas in a succession of gradually lowering swells,
nature rested and smiled. After his days of weary tramp-
ing through a semi-tropical forest, Mr. Chipley, as he gazed
up at the dark, graceful pines waving high above his head,
and looked into the crystal waters of the lake flashing back
the deep azure of the vaulted heavens, as they lapped the
white sand at his feet, exclaimed, "Here a town shall be
built." Andlittle wonder. It was a veritable garden of the
gods. lie at once gave orders to the cross-tie cutters that
the forest should not be disturbed within the circuit of a
mile or two, and arrangements were at once made for the
location of a station of the Pensacola and Atlantic Rail-
road. This was the first inspiration. To-day, the Florida
Chautauqua, located on the shores of Lake DeFuniak, is
perhaps as widely discussed as any institution of its kind in
the United States. Its registry books of visitors personally
participating in the annual exercises and distinguished peo-
ple upon its platform furni-h evidence that the foremost
and brightest minds
4: -'ll of our country are in
t hearty co-operation
with its success,
which has been phe-
nomenal almost from
its inception.
The providing of a
home for a sister in-
stitution to that glo-
rious establishment
of instruction and re-
creation, the original
New York "Chautau-
qua" made accessible
one of the most de-
lightful and health-
giving resorts in the
whole South.
Hon, Wallace Eruce, DeFuniak Lake is
PRESIDENT FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.
about midway be-
tween Tallahassee and Pensacola, the half-way station be-
tween Jacksonville and New Orleans. It occupies an eleva-
tion of three hundred feet above the level of the Gulf, from
which it is distant twenty miles, in a region known as the
"Adirondacks of Florida."
When its elevation, sandy loam soil, absolutely pure water
-than which none purerever gushed from rocks or bubbled
like lyrics and idyls from the soil-and sweetly scented
breezes laden with the aroma of pine and magnolia are
taken into consideration, its advantages as a health resort
and winter retreat can be readily understood. These advan-
tages, coupled with its easy accessibility to and from all
points, probably inspired the idea of establishing a winter
Chautauqua here, as near a counterpart of the one on Lake
Chautauqua, New York State, as possible.
The undertaking was no small one, but in the books of
Mr. Chipley and his co-adjutors, Dr. A. H, Gillet, Mr. C. C.
Banfill, T. T. Wright and others who bravely put their shoul-
ders to the wheel and bore the burdens of those early days,
there was written no such word as fail. And their faith was
not misplaced. The sound of the woodman's axe and the
crashing fall of the forest giant was soon followed by the


loud hosannas of thousands who have gathered there from
all America. And they in turn have been taken up by the
happy shouts and merry laughter of childhood and echoed
by the voice of the wise teacher from every land.
It is not the purpose of this article to give a detailed ac-
count of the discouragements and obstacles encountered by
the pioneers in this great work. Nor is it the desire of the
writer to weary the reader with a mass of statistics which
would probably be forgotten as soon as read. Suffice it that
when the result of the brilliant season recently closed is com-
pared with the opening one, only ten years ago, when the
outlay was $11,000 and the receipts $400, it will be seen that
the undertaking has met with public appreciation.
One can easily imagine what the result would have been
had the financial conditions of the past year, everywhere,
been less stringent.
The benefits which have been derived and are yet to come
from the establishment of this new Chautauqua in the "Sun-
ny South" are beyond computation. These may be judged
by what has been accomplished by the Northern Chautau-
qua. We know that not only have the most prominent
churchmen all over the country united in bringing the latter
to its present state of perfection, but also that devotees of
science and letters, men and women, who have devoted their
lives to the enlightenment and advancement of the human
race, have seen in this Chautauqua, in what were the wilds
of Western Florida, an opportunity of extending their sphere
of usefulness.
Chautauqua I doubt if any other one institution has done
so much to stimulate thought and to cultivate a desire for a
higher and better civilization. What other institution with
as high purpose is so far-reaching inresults? People gath-
er there each summer from every State; aye, from nearly
every hamlet in the Union, animated by the one impulse of
advancement, spiritual and temporal. They return to their
homes strengthened in mind and body, filled with new ideas,
new enthusiasm.
They cannot hoard the riches they have thus accumulated,
but must of necessity scatter them as pearls on every side.
The result is that Chautauqua clubs are formed in cities and
towns throughout the land, and the march of advancement
is never checked. To the contrary, the sphere of refinement
is enlarged and brightened. If the Chautauqua in the North
can accomplish such results, why should not its success be
duplicated in the South ? In Florida, the "land of flowers."
Many thousands of people incapable of withstanding the
rigors of a Northern winter each year journey southward to
escape the icy blasts and recuperate their wasted energies
in that more genial clime. To these alone this Florida Chau-
tauqua will prove a boon indeed. The mere search for health,
the enforced inactivity and lack of mental occupation in the
larger number of health resorts, the constant mapping out
for one's self the greatest comfort and enjoyment, is one of
the most difficult problems with which invalids and others
have to contend. Chautauqua furnishes just theelements
that other sanitariums lack: Something to do and some-
thing to think about.
The wilderness in which the Florida Chautauqua was plan-
ted has with the advent of man developed unexpected re-
sources.
The land, once considered worthless, has shown itself capa-
ble of producing in abundance every variety of fruit and
vegetable indigenous to a semi-tropical climate.
The location being one of great natural beauty, it produces


- --II


I I Ij









THE rLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


at once a favorable impression upon all visitors, with the
result that since the arrival of the first railroad train, De-
Funiak Lake has enjoyed a steady and substantial growth.
Could the residents of that region, of a century ago, return
from the world of spirits and observe the progress of the
intervening years-yea, of the last decade-what joy would
fill their hearts and how they would stand amazed in the
midst of such a grand encompassment! The resident popula-
tion of DeFuniak is about 1200, largely from the North,
East and West; but during the Chautauqua season-exten-
ding from the middle of February until late in March-this
is swelled to upwards of 3000. Many handsome cottages
owned by non-residents are occupied during all the winter
months. All about DeFuniak are miles of fine hard roads,
which are a rareity in Florida and appreciated by all who
are fond of driving. Aside from DeFuniak Lake or Spring,
which is as round as a silver dollar, exactly a mile in circum-
ference, eighty feet deep and clear as a crystal, are the Stan-
ley Lakes, a mile and a half distant. And they consist of
two beautiful bodies of water over three miles in circumfer-
ence.
Some idea of the various lines of instruction taken up at
the Florida Chautauqua during the past season, and these
are in addition to two or three lectures and concerts every
day, may be gleaned from the following: Music was taught
under the direction of Dr. H. R. Palmer, of New York.
There were three classes: Chorus, sight reading and har-
mony. There were also instruction classes in china, oil and
water-color painting, and drawing. Besides these, the Wo-
man's Christian Temperance Union School of Methods, C.
L. S. C. Round Tables, primary teachers' normal class for
the instruction of Sunday-school teachers, young people's
normal class, kindergarten, amateur photography, Sunday-
scoool normal class, biblical exposition, minister's institute e,
school of plih -;i.: l -ituI'e-_. ,l.1., utin anud D :Il-A-a ;. ilnlirlr --i
tativereci-al.. ud astr...i.:.iiy. ar.: w-:rthl ...i f ii.:nt l*In. m-
bers were ad. itted-i at t..a h. t l,i--le ~ itll, frc,: ..r at .,
very moderate ,o -.t.
No one call f ail t:. appr'-.:iate the at lv,-r nta-..:- t .. -. d: eriv. l
by a few wee- k-' -. ur:.nr aLmid -Liuc -uirr, i..u .iniiL T... ih.
educated pIcrs-on it will serve a. a poi:-11 t.., fa- ult.-- *-r,:.. i
rusty perha -l tlhr-..uL l di--le. To th-..-e '..-: eC.rl., > ie -
tion has been ci,'lc_'td and wh. ilrin- thil -I tr'L l_- .LI.
turmoil of e\vcry-,lda It' are lebarrled fronim l kiti ill[ i
later year- f ,r tle diprLvat.:.nr .: f y. uth. C liaLtau.uia-- n.1l
I mention it ino.w in its hr...id -.eni-e-i- a raplil. a ''.,iilr~hli-u-
sive teach:-r. New avn'Li u o-f thl.. ilit ar ,.-,,ue, l up, i..) w
methodsof -elf-in t ructnioni are -utiwg__'e-stel aud in a fx-w \wI.: k
storesof kint'.w ledtfearegathered rwi. h i..tih-rhwi. e w,:,r.l liav-.:
required years of patient study in hool,.-.
W ith ea.-h -LuclC,-: inri. y.- .r IIrcat ir.:-.re-s and ]i[r-pr..er-
ments have been uiia i, S ..uitlil la-n...tably in Fl...riJa--
the "land o:f tloieri." s... called beIcaL-e ':f it- -emt -trl:.pi,:al
luxuriance. Tihl? -ear- to: coine will be nrl: lI-- frLuitful in
golden achiiev\,ciie nt.. The day--prin; of learning; \vht.h
has visited many .ien itghtdl tract, in the so:uti h is, well a.
other secti:,ti. o: f the c':untry, cha-inu away the niglit :of
gloom and de-pair which ila, c.,vered such a lar--e .-xpan.,
of territory. ha- di .-per-d "-itli "'G:-d-gi \en ray '" the- imuirky
atmosphere o:f bigotry and preiudi.e. the reuIllliUt .,f tl-h
darkness of former days. A.\ thie millioi'.s of p.,-_Lpulation in
our country increase and the S.-uth dcvel.:-pes. Florida's
Chautauqua will ov\crtl:,w it.s bot.nud and ottherChaL taLiquas
willbe establi-ihed. S, imay the g;'ood work go on until it
becomes as br.-.ad as the land itself. "*As we recline upon


the mossy bank and look into the delightful blue of the
heavens, see the dancing waters of the lake flash back the
rays of the sun, feel the gentle breezes from the Gulf upon
our cheeks and listen to the hum of happy voices about us,
we say to each other surely the names of those who con-
ceived and carried out this glorious undertaking-this para-
dise on earth-will not be forgotten."
Among those names, that of State Senator W. D. Chipley
must surely be accorded the place of honor. Fourteen years
ago, the writer, while a resident of Pensacola, was first intro-
duced to the Senator, then manager of the Pensacola Rail-
road. In the conversation incidental to a short business call
at his office, the intellectual breadth of the man made an
impression ever to be remembered. The wonderful prosper-
ity of West Florida and the city of Pensacola, his home, has
been largely attributable to his efforts and influence; yet
that this is so has not been a matter of much surprise to
those who have been honored with his acquaintance and
whose knowledge has been broadened by the acquaintance
and study of such men as he. It robs no one of honors justly
due when the state-
ment is made that
to him more than to
any and every one i5
else is due the credit
of bringing about
the construction of
the Pensacola and
Atlantic Railroad, '
and the consequent
developementof the
surrounding coun- .
try. The establish-
ment of the Florida
Chautal iiiiu- i n- I
,ir,: l hi htim.l It

f -a: tt ltL.i- "i 11 - -






l.f l..:.r f i.:.r ti r ad -

, tr. thly l i h .i ul 1.. .. i. ..l tl.-i that I.i " ly
arbli t.- the ._ ,...f L 'e i iun iia k-T e Flrri.i La biit u-

T lh .: i] 1i1 t lli ': L-'I- i t t .t k.:.f thi anli- 1- d i c.







TIhe FI:1rida 'l1aldL11.1 Lt. ill 1: u ttn- t 1; L ir.- .I f p 1in.







:ier a d F':a1 i Lll .t d tne r a la..tt>S; .!ini: iliitt-ird t Iii-.-,-
Sthi :.ut- t li l. I t lld it.i tli ull l. i .-a. Ii -. -.l f*.*i It I... W all-
a.c'. Bruc- : rt.h y ly-N,. lY it- pr -id , .. it .:.ne of tlhe
ri r .ii, .nd b t a n .- f htin t tihe r- t and l pr -iit ,l-a nd-
in- li-.iirt le- .! tll It- "*..rhil!.. i rt .:lin t 1- under
taLi; lit Dr. .%V. L. L i d-: ... i-. a m an ..f il.rked
ability, and o:,-i-t" if thi L-ett kn..\v- n r and opularCanli r.,it ,,Ur
thjan,, -er't in AXnericA.. t' n lia Cliar e .:.ti ix .._ 4 ll-e
la-ling a-i.:nb ,ll !. H N. ridl iani-htan't r-,-ill p ,latf.t.rui
talent. lii g'-~od iLid'.liii^ dt fine platf...rmi ahility V ause
inin t.:. be n iucli -, out ht i aftcr f.:l r tli;, line of -.:-.rk.
T li, Fl.:.rida C- lia ulalL It. ', ,rill c.:.utm iin L t-:m e t t, pr.c- i -

le. tiaV laL.:.red O fli -fu-lly aud zeal uily f..rith llvelp-
ruent, but a bles-in_ to thle pres->nt and many future gener-
ati,:u-.-. o im:ote it .e.
--F'raa h. i .- ueh. 1 1, "- .


I I


~-- --- I _~ ___








6 THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


--- DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION. a


CLASS WORK ALONG VARIOUS LINES.

Here for four weeks instruction is given and inspiration
is gathered, and in the enthusiasm of present attainments
the students go out to carry on the work themselves during
the year to come. The impetus gathered during the days
of the Assembly, if husbanded carefully, will carry one
successfully through the year, and well up the heights.





































DR. H. R. PALMER, - Director.
Dr. Palmer is too well known as composer, director, teach-
er and musical critic to need an introduction. Chautauquans
everywhere know him as the head of the great College of
Music at Chautauqua, and we are most fortunate in having
him here. He will conduct three classes.
1. Chorus Class.-It will meet on the tabernacle platform
at 7 each evening for an hour of thorough work under the
accurate baton of this prince of leaders. This class is free
to all who buy chorus book and have ticket to the assembly.
Miss Alice Bates the charming accompanist will return, to
the delight of all.
2. Sight-Reading Class.-This class affords an opportu-
nity for those who do not read music, or who read it imper-
fectly, to become proficient. Dr. Palmer is a magnetic,
enthusiastic teacher with ideas and methods of his own.
Teachers would be well repaid by a careful study of them in
the class. A new book this year. Instruction free to those
who buy the book.
3. Harmony Class.-This class open to all who read plain
music. Purchase of the book the only fee required. These
lessons which in New York would cost $4.00 each, $80 for the
20 lessons, are given absolutely free, an opportunity which
should be appreciated by musicians of the south.


I


- "I r


II.-CHINA PAINTING.
Miss JENNIE WHITE, Madisonville, O. - Teacher.
Miss White will give instructions in China Painting. All
information as to terms and work can be secured by writing
to Miss White at Madisonville, O. Miss White is well known
in Cincinnati and other cities as an artist of rare ability,
also an experienced and successful teacher. Her work with
us the last two years was highly appreciated.
China will be fired in the studio (the Wilke Studio Kiln).
Miss White will have undecorated china and all appli-
ances for the work on sale, together with many beautiful
specimens of work. She will also give instruction in draw_
ing, painting in oil and water colors, portrait painting and
sketching from nature.
III.-KINTERGARTEN.
Miss SUSAN PLESSNER POLLOCK, Washington, D. C. - Teacher.
All parents will appreciate this department of work for
the sake of their children. Our teacher is one of the best
in this country. She will bring all needed appliances, and
the school will be thoroughly equipped. A month will give
the children a wonderful start. It is unquestionably the
best system for the little children just beginning to study.
The terms will be low and the school will be full.
This instructor will also conduct a Normal class for teach-
ers who want to get some insight into the best methods of
work, with a view of introducing it into their schools.
V.-PHYSICIAL EDUCATION: LITERATURE, ELOCUTION
AND AESTHETICS.
Miss KATHRYN STALEY, New York City.
For particulars, address Miss Staley, The Windermere, W. 57th Street,
New York City.
Special Features of Class Work.-In English, Elocution
and Physicial Training'no philosophical system or method
will be exclusively taught, but anything of practical value
in any method will be used. There are methods yet to be
developed.
Students will be trained with special reference to their
preparation to teach in Normal Schools, Academies and
higher institutions of learning.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
The first part of this carefully selected course, in the
case of each student based on physical examination, follows
the Swedish System of exercise-flexing and breathing and
general exercises for control of the body; gradually lead-
ing into light and heavy apparatus work, college gymnas-
tics and games; or where preferred, into more purely
Aesthetic Gymnastics.-Advanced work in drills for grace
in Classic Art and Statue Posing, preparatory to Panto-
mime and Gesture and facial Expression, following the
admirable methods of the New York School of Expression
(Mrs. Genevieve Stebbins.)
The Design of both courses is not the mere acquisition
of great muscular strength, but the even development and
flexibility and consequent health of all the muscles and
organs. The courses cannot fail to improve the physical
conditions of students, to correct hereditary and acquired
faults; and to prepare them to carry on the various lines of
Physical Education in Schools.
Miss Staley conducts aud illustrates departments in
various magazines on the subject of Physical Training
that have gained the heartiest commendation and enthus-
iasm for the subject.
LITERATURE, RHETORIC AND ELOCUTION.
The acquisition of an elegant and refined Pronunciation
and of absolutely distinct Utterance. A flexible and melod-
ious voice and natural results in reading and speaking; the
development of the sensibilities, whereby correct, instant
and vigorous emotional expression comes in response to
thought.-These results are to follow the most careful elo-
cutionary training.
The Aids and Instruments in Critical Study. The His-




Sn i -- --- ~- ~ ----- ---- --- --~-^ ~. .


THE rLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA. 7


tory of Literature after the briefest outline, is taught in
connection with the study of Representative Authors of
different Literary Periods. The influence is traced of the
writer upon the Development of the E Iglish Language and
Literature; the reaction upon his own mind of his environ-
ment, his studies, etc., are taught in connection with the
critical study of Masterpieces which are regarded as typical
of the different periods.
AESTHETICS.
The object of this department is not to make artists, but
to develop lovers of art and the ability to understand some
of the lessons of civilization embodied in the World's art.
Class-Work will include a general survey of the history
and development of Architecture and Sculpture, Painting
Music and Poetry.
Fees will be reasonable in classes or for private instruc-
tion. VI.-CHILDREN'S HOUR.
MRS. ROXARA B. PRE&SZR, Chicago, Ill., Teacher.
What a splendid time our young people will have each
afternoon at four o'clock for ten days in their own room in
Chipley Hall, studying bright and beautiful lessons with
this gifted teacher. During all the past years of the as-
sembly this meeting has been greatly praised by our young
people and this year will certainly be no exception to the
rule. Our teacher is one of the best in the land. Get ready
for this great treat.
VII.-PRIMARY TEACHERS' CLASS.
MRS. ROXANA B. PRENSZER, Chicago, Ill., - Teacher.
It has always been the aim of the Florida Chautauqua
to keep special work in the interests of Sunday,School
teachers at the front. Large plans have been made this
year in their behalf. Mrs. Prenszer, a woman of very wide
Sunday School experience, who has been very successful in
Normal Work, will give a series of interesting talks which
cannot fail to be very uplifting and helpful to all Sunday
School workers. Such practical themes will be discussed
as; The Primary Class, Environment; Attendance; Grad-
ing, its importance; Singing, its use, how best taught; The
Teacher's Preparation; Methods of Teaching; The Black-
board, with hints on drawing; Child Conversion; Child
Nature, etc. Vill.-WOMAN'S CLUB.
MRS. M. C. HICKMAN, Cleveland, 0., - Leader.
This is a new feature of our work which will be gladly
welcomed by the good women of to-day, who are interest-
ing themselves in great questions and who are preparing
themselves to have large share in the world's work. Mrs.
Hickman is a well known writer and talker, who, for some
years, has been actively engaged in work for women. She
has been eminently successful at other assemblies in this
line of work. The subjects will be found in the detailed
program. They cover a wide range. The club will be held
daily for ten days, at 4 p. m., at the M. E. Church. Multi-
tudes of women should visit the Florida Chautauqua for
the sake of this important gathering.
IX.-ART NEEDLE WORK AND EMBROIDERY.
MRS. SUSIE BIRCH JENNINGS, Washington, D. C.
Mrs. Jennings will be remembered as one of the pioneers
at the Florida Chautauqua. She was one of the chief pro-
moters of the Glen Echo Chautauqua at Washington, D. C.
and is now actively engaged with Miss Clara Barton in the
Red Cross movement. She is an active busy woman who
has a famous way of "bringing things to pass" Whatever
she attempts is certain to be accomplished. She is well
known to the multitudes of Chautauqua people everywhere.
She will make her department of work a delight.- Terms
will be reasonable and will be made known on application.
X.-DEVOTIONAL HOUR.
IWe shall not burden the program with daily announce-


ments of this most important service of the day, but let it
be well understood that each morningat 9.00 o'clock, through
the kindness of the trustees of the M. E. Church our devo-
tional service will be held in that building. The supreme
object will be to lead souls to Christ, and build up souls in
Christ. The desire is to make it the bright helpful hour of
all the day. A number of well known Christian workers
will have charge of this service. During the first week,
Rev. John Thompson, of Philadelphia, that splendid old
veteran, connec d editorially with the Christian Standard,
and for many yrs the chief inspiration and laterly the
chief manager of the great International Camp-Meeting at
Mountain Lake, Md., will have charge of the services. It
will be a great benediction to know and hear the man. Rev.
H. B. Westervelt, of Columbus, O., will also have prominent
part in some of these services. God has wonderfully owned
his efforts in the past, and we shall give him glad welcome
to De Funiak.
XI.-LECTURES ON CHRISTIAN EVIDENCES.
Da. J. B. KOKHNE, Allegheny City, Pa.
For one week these morning talks on Christian Ethics
will take the place of the usual devotional service, and will
be placed at the ten o'clock hour, in the hope that the time
will a little better accommodate the masses who will be in-
terested in these discussions given by such a master as Dr.
Kohne. He is a new, great, and successful platform man
with a mission. His series on The Nazarene, of the Reason-


Hon. Roswell G. Horr,
ableness of Christianity, will be found wonderfully help-
ful. He piles truth upon truth, mountain high, and has won-
derful command of fine English.
XII.-C. L. S. C. ROUND TABLES.
These gatherings will be held frequently with addresses
by distinguished visitors who maybe on the grounds. Chau-
tauqua literature will be distributed, and conversations held
regarding the course of study, and its benefits.


























II A -








.- 4C IC~F


GLImPSES OF DEFUNIAK. -, ALPINE PARK.


-t.s~bw










THE FLORIDA CMAUTAUQUA. 9


The Platform.


'LIST OF FINE TALENT SECURED.


Musical Offerings:

DR. H. R. PALMER, New York City, Prince
of Chorus Directors.
ROGERS' GOSHEN BAND AND ORCHESTRA.
THE ARION LADY QUARTETTE, Chicago, 11.
MIss CORNELIA MINEHEARDT, Burlington,
Wis., and MIss EVELYN A. COOPER, Chi-
cago, Ill,, Violinists.
DR.W.F.BROWN, Canonsbnrg, Pa. Cornetist
MISS GERTRUDE AND MR. ARTHUR PALMER
Violinists, Moberly, Mo.

Soloists:

MIss ESTELLE HARRINGTON, Chicago.
MRS. TINETTA MARIE CULP, Mantua, O.
MRS. ELIZABETH WALLACE, Chicago, Ill.
MISS MISSOURI CAWTHON, DeFuniak
Springs.
MIss ELLIE WENTWORTH, Pensacola, Fla.

Readers:

JAMES S. BURDETTE, the Famous New York
Humorist.
BENJAMEN C. CHAPIN, of Warren, 0., the
Well Known Impersonator.
MIss ANNE VIRGINIA CULBERTSON, Zanes-
ville, 0., Poet and Humorist.
MRS. MARGUERITE CRAIG KNOWLES, the
Platform Queen, Minneapolis, Minn.
MIss KATHRYN STALEY, Well Known
Writer, Reader and Teacher, New York
City.

Entertainers and Illustrated Lecturers:

HARRY S. RIGGS, Muncie, Ind., Unique
Whistler and Reciter.
CHEIRO, Boston, Mass., the Palmist; the
Wonder of Two Continents in Illustrated
Lectures.
C. OLIVER POWER, Columbus, O., in Novel
and Beautiful Illustrated Lectures.
PROF. LOUIS FAVOUR, Chicago, Ill., with
Tons of Apparatus and Brilliant Elec-
trical Experiments.
DR. G. W. HUBBARD, Nashville, Tenn.,
The Life and Times of Andrew Jack-
son." Beautifully Illustrated.
J. A. BATES, Savannah, Ga., The Amatoor
Fotygraffer."

Lecture Platform:

HON. ROSWELL G. HORR, New York City.
DR. SAMUEL BEILER, Vice-Chancellor Am-
erican University, Washington, D. C.
DR. EARL CRANSTON, Cincinnati, O.
W. W. SMITH, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
DR. W. F. BROWN, Canonsburg, Pa.
DR. J. B. KOEHNE, Allegheny City, Pa.


DR. WILBUR G. WILLIAMS, St. Louis, Mo.
REV. J. B. KENYON. Syarcuse, N. Y.
DR. J. W. LEE, St. Louis, Mo.
J. WELLINGTON VANDIVER, Talladega, Ala.
REV. J. B. WHITFORD, Caro, Mich.
PRESIDENT 0, CLUTE, Lake City, Fla.
HoN. J. G. HARRIS, Montgomery, Ala.
DR. H. S. YERGER, Pensacola, Fla.
PROF, F. E. HIRSCH, Charles City, Ia.
DR. A. B. RIKER, Wheeling, W. Va.
REV. W. T. S, CuLP, Mantua, 0.
REV. J. D. PHELPS, D.D. Buffalo, N.Y.
HON. WALLACE BRUCE, Brooklyn, N, Y., and
others with whom engagements are pending.



Detailed Program


Thursday, February 20.
(FOUNDER'S DAY.)
8.00 Opening of the twelfth session of the
Florida Chautauqua. Music by Rogers'
Band. SOLOIST: Miss Estelle Harring-
ton; VIOLIN MuSIC: Misses Mineheardt
and Cooper; READINGS: Mrs. Marguerite
Craig Knowles, and Miss Kathryn Staley,
New York. Brief words of welcome from
Pres. Hon. Wallace Bruce, Col. W. D.
Chipley and Supt. W. L. Davidson. Brief
words from distinguished visitors. Hand
shake all around. Everybody get ac-
quainted.
Friday, February 12.
9.00 Devotional hour: Rev. John Thompson,
Philadelphia, Pa.
10.00 Organization of all special classes, of
which detailed announcement will be
made.
1.30 Sight reading class: Dr. H. R. Palmer.
2.30 Promenade concert: Rogers' Goshen
Band.
3.00 Elocutionary recital, with brief address:
Miss Kathryn Staley, New York City.
4.30 First session Woman's Club: Foreign
Missions, Mrs. M. C. Hickman, Cleve-
land, 0.
7.00 Chorus rehearsal: Dr. H. R. Palmer.
8.00 Lecture: Bacon, the Author of the Shakes-
peare Plays, Dr. H. R. Palmer, New York
City.
9.20 Informal Reception at Hotel Chautauqua,
impromptu program.
Saturday, February 22.
(WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY.)
3.00 Lecture: George Washington. Speaker to be
announced.
4.30 Woman's Club: Home Missions, Mrs
Hickman.
8.00 Grand Concert: Rogers' Band, Prof. Pal-
mer and Chorus; soloists, Miss Harring-
ton and Miss Cawthon; readings, Mrs.
Knowles; violinists, Misses Mineheardt
and Cooper. Stereopticon views relat-
ing to the foot-steps of Washington.
Sunday, February 23.
9.00 Sunday School in the city churches.
11.00 Sermon : Dr. Samuel J. Beiler, Washing-
ton, D. C.


5.00 Chautauqua Sunday Vesper Service: Dr.
W. L. Davidson.
7.00 Song Service: Dr. Palmer.
7.30 Sermon: Rev. Dr. Earl Cranston, Cin-
cinnati, 0.

Monday, February 24.
3.00 Lecture: The Black or White Flag, Which ?
Dr. S. J. Beiler.
4.30 Woman's Club: Causes of Intemperance,
Mrs. Hickman.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Misses Minehardt and
Cooper.
8.00 Lecture: Where the Other Half Live, with
beautiful stereopticon illustrations. C.
Oliver Power, Columbus, O.

Tuesday, February 25.
3.00 Lecture: Professor Satan, Dr. Earl Crans-
ton, Cincinnati, O.
4.30 Woman's Club: Effects of Intemperance.
Mrs. Hickman.
8.00 Lecture: M-odern Inferno, with many ori-
ginal stereopticon views. C. Oliver Pow-
er.
Wednesday, February 26.
TEMPERANCE DAY.
3.00 Lecture: What to do with an Abomination,
Wm. W. Smith, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
4.30 Woman's Club: Remedies for Intemper-
ance, Mrs. Hickman.
8.00 Lecture: The New Aristocracy, Dr. J. B.
Koehne, Allegheny City, Pa.

Thursday, February 27.
10.00 Lecture: Christian Evidences, beginning
on series on Christian Evidences, Pagan-
ism Before Christ. Dr. Koehne, Alle-
gheny City, Pa.
3.00 Lecture: Modern Science and Immortality,
President O. Clute, LL.D., Lake City,Fla.
4.30 Woman's Club: Home-Making a Profes-
sion. Mrs. Hickman.
8.00 Recital by the noted Poet and Humorist,
Miss Anne Virginia Culbertson, Zanes-
ville, O., assisted by the assembly solo,
ists.
9.20 Reception at Hotel Chautauqua.

Friday, February 28.
10.00 Christian Evidences: Judaism Before
Christ. Dr. Koehne.
3.00 Lecture Sanctity ofthe MarriageRelation.
Rev. Wilbur G. Williams, St. Louis, Mo.
4.30 Woman's Club: Women as Bread Win-
ners, Mrs. Hickman.
800 Lecture: The Labor Problem. Hon. Ros-
well G. Horr, New York.

Saturday, February 29.
NATIONAL DAY.
10.00 Christian Evidences: The Sermon on the
Mount, or Christ's Ethical Teachings. Dr.
Koehne.
11.23 Recital: Miss Anne V. Culbertson, as-
sisted by the assembly soloists.
3.00 Lecture: Protection vs. Free Trade. Hon.
Roswell G. Horr, the leading exponent
of Protection in America.
4.30 Woman's Club: Ministry of Childhood.
Mrs. Hickman.
8.00 Grand Concert : Arion Lady Quartette
Chicago, Ill. Music on the lake.


a i








10 THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


Sunday, March 1.
9.00 Sunday School in city churches.
11.00 Sermon: Rev. J. B. Kenyon, Syarcuse,
N. Y.
5.00 Chautauqua Sunday Vesper Service : Dr.
W. L. Davidson.
7.00 Song Service: Dr. Palmer.
7.30 Sermon: Dr. Wilbur G. Williams, St.
Louis, Mo.
Monday, March S.
10.00 Christian Evidences: The Miracles. Dr.
Koehne.
3.00 Lecture: Books and Reading. Dr. J. B.
Kenyon, Syarcuse, N. Y.
4.30 Woman's Club: Sunshine, Literal and
Figurative. Mrs. HickmAn.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Arion Quartette.
[8.00 Lecture: Through Bible Lands with Cam-
era. Dr. J. W. Lee, St. Louis, Mo.
Tuesday, March 3.
10.00 Christian Evidences: The Wonderfu
Words. Dr. Koehne.
3.00 Lecture: RoamingThrough Rome. Dr.W.
F. Brown, Canonsburg, Pa.
8.00 Lecture: Some People I Have Met, Rev.
J. B. Kenyon.
Wednesday, March 4.
10.00 Modern Skepticism, or Ingersollism. Dr.
Koehne.
3.00 Lecture: The Great Men of To-morrow.
Rev. J. W. Lee.
7.45 Musical Prelude: Dr. Palmer and chorus,
and Arion Quartette.
8.15 Lecture: Roamingin andAbout Rome, with
stereopticon views. W. F. Brown.
Thursday, March 5.
3.00 Grand Concert: Arion Lady Quartette
and Assembly talent.
8.00 Lecture: Cheiro, Boston, Mass. Unique
palmist, with beautiful stereopticon il-
lustrations.
9.20 Reception at Hotel Chautauqua.
Friday, March 6.
3.00 Lecture: Ifthe Court Please. J.Wellington
Vandiver.
8.00 Lecture: Cheiro, with stereopticon il-
lustrations.
Saturday, March 7.
CHILDREN'S DAY.
11.30 Lecture: The Missing Rib. J. Wellington
Vandiver.
3.00 Entertainment: James S. Burdette, the
famous Humorist and Dialect Reciter,
assisted by Miss Gertrude and Mr.
Arthur Palmer, violinists.
8.00 Grand Concert: Arion Lady Quartette,
Rogers' Band, Dr. Palmer and Chorus,
and the full strength of assembly solo-
ists. Music on the lake.
Sunday, March 8.
9.00 Sunday School in the city churches.
11.00 Sermon: Rev. J. D. Phelps, Buffalo, N.Y.
Solo: Miss Ellie G. Wentworth, Pansacola,
Fla., and Arion Quartette.
5.00 Chautauqua Sunday Vesper Services: Dr.
W. L. Davidson.
7.00 Song Service : Dr. Palmer.
7.30 Sermon: J. B.Whitford, D. D.,Caro, Mich.
Monday, March 9.
3.00 Lecture: Dante, Rev. J. B. Whitford, Caro,
Mich.
8.00 An Hour With the Celebrated Humori*t.
James S. Burdette, assisted by the as-


sembly soloists.
Tuesday, March 10.
3.00 Lecture: Companionship of Men and Books.
Hon. J. G. Harris, Montgomery, Ala.
4.30 C. L. S. C. Round Table: Dr. W. L. David-
son.
8.00 Lecture: Cape Cod Folks, Rev. J. D.
Phelps, Buffalo, N. Y.
Wednesday, March 11.
3.00 Lecture: Matrimony. Dr. H. S. Yerger,
Pensacola, Fla.
8.00 Lecture: Life and Times of Gen. Andrew
Jackson, with beautiful stereopticon illus-
trations, by Dr. G. W. Hubbard, Nashville,
Tenn.
Thursday, March 12.
3.00 Lecture: On the Threshold. Prof. F. E.
Hirsch, Charles City, Ia.
8.00 Lecture; The Funny Side of Life, with
humorous- readings, popular songs and
marvelous whistling, by Harry Spillman
Riggs, Muncie, Ind.
t.au Reception at Hotel Chautauqua.
Friday, March 13.
3.00 Grand Concert: Dr. Palmer and Chorus,
Band, and Assembly Soloists.
8.00 Lecture: Electricity, with tons of apparatus
and brilliant, experiments, by Prof. Louis
Favour, Chicago, Ill.
Saturday, March 14.
FLORIDA DAY.
11.30 Entertainment: Reading, Songs and Whist-
ling, with a talk on The Wit and Humor of
Song, by Harry Spillman Riggs.
3.00 Lecture : Possibilities of Electricity ; plat-
form covered with apparatus, producing
many brilliant experiments. Prof. Louis
Favour.
8.00 Grand Concert: Dr. Palmer and Chorus,
Rogers' Band, Mrs. Elizabeth Wallace,
Chicago, Mrs. Tinetta Marie Culp, Man-
tua, 0., Miss Missouri Cawthon, Mr.
Arthur and Miss Gertrude Palmer, violin-
ists, and 15 minutes of stereopticon views.
Sunday, March 15.
9.00 Sunday School in city churches.
11.00 Sermon: Rev. A. B. Riker, D. D., Wheel-
ing, W. Va.
5.00 Sunday Chautauqua Vesper Services: Al-
pine Park. Dr. W. L. Davidson.
7.00 Song Service : Dr. Palmer.
7.30 Sermon. Rev. W. T. Sherman Culp, Man-
tua, 0.
Monday, March 16.
300 Lecture: What Shall We Do With Our
Boys? Dr. A. B Riker, D. D.
4.30 C. L. S. C. Round Table.
8.00 Entertainment: Dickens' Beautiful Crea-
tion, Nicholas Nieckelby. Benjamin C.
Chapin, Warren, 0.. faithfully assuming
all the characters.
Tuesday, March 17.
3.00 Lecture: Uncrowned Kings, Rev. W. T.
Sherman Culp, Mantua, 0.
8.00 Lecture: The J~oys and Sorrows of an Ama-
oor otygraffer, illustrated by fifty novel
and original stereopticon views. Prof. J.
A. Bates, Savannah, Ga.
Wednesday, March 18.
3.00 Grand Entertainment: Glimpses of Nature.
A collection of novel and original charac-
terizations. Benjamen C. Chapin.
8.00 Grand Closing Concert: Including the full
strength of the assembly soloists. Good-
bye to '96, and prophesies for '97.


RATES OF ADMISSION.

Season Ticket, .adults, - - 3. :
1, child, 10 to 15 1.75
Week adults, - - 1.25
S child, 10 to 15 .65.
Full Day adults, - .35
child, 10 to 15 .20,
Admission to Single Entertainment .25.
Child, 10 to 15, Single Admission .15,
Children under 10, Free.
SThe above tickets admit to all the-
exercises of Ihe Assembly, save special
classes. For this class work the rates
are reasonable and will be made known
by the teachers of the various depart-
ments. Their addresses are found else-
where.in the program. Take up some
line of special study. Write the teach-
ers about the work and their terms.
Twenty-eight days, three 50 cent en-
tertainments; worth ordinarily $44.00.
We give you the same for $3.50 or a frac-
tion more than 4 cents an entertain-
ment. Where can you get good things
cheaper ? It will pay you to buy a sea-
son ticket. If you buy by the day it
will cost you $8.40




McLeod & Reeves

Rlttorneus and

Counsellors at Law,

Will practice in all Courts of the
State, both State and
Federal.

DeFuniak Springs, Fla.





F.C.EATON

Dry Goods,
( Groceries,
Fruits and
Vegetables,
Tobaccos and
Cigars.

Tinware, Nails, Lime, Lumber,
Flour and Feed.


THE BEST IN TOWN.




F. C.EATON


I: I I I -








THE ILORIDA CHAUTAUQUA. 11


THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
"WALLACE BRUCE, Pres. N. COVER, Vice-Pres.
T. F. MCGOURIN, Sec. W. C. EDDY, Treas.
W. L. DAVIDSON, Supt. ofInstruction.
D. CAMPBELL, MRS, J. T. SHERMAN,
L. W. PLANK, W. L. CAWTHON,
WM. ROGERS, A. FAYE,
J. J. FITZGERALD.


Rev, ETW. T. Sherman Culp.


POINTS OF INFORMATION.

This years' program is one of un-
usual strength.

Excellent accommodations can be
procured at the hotels and private
homes, at from $5 to $15 per week.

ROGERS' BAND will give a delightful
concert each day at 2:30, on the Taber-
nacle platform.
*
Our music this year will be of a high
order. We shall give a royal welcome
to Dr. Palmer and the Rogers' band.

Our lake is a gem. It is a mile to
the inch in circumference and as round
as a silver dollar. It affords splendid
facilities for boating.
*
Hunters can find much game in the
surrounding forests, and fishermen
may have excellent sport in the Gulf,
or near-by streams.

Programme sixteen pages this year.
The great generosity of our advertisers,
and the splendid historical article by
Gen. Loud made it necessary. Our
thanks to one and all.


We have never offered our patrons
anything more dignified in the line of
Bibical Studies than the series of
Christian Evidences, to be presented
by Dr. J. B. Koehne.

Pleasant excursions can be made at
cheap rates to all points from DeFuni-
ak. Special arrangements are always
made for the accommodation of our
patrons.
*
If you will send the name and ad-
dress of your friends to Secretary T.
F. McGourin, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.,
he will be glad to mail this beautiful
program to them.
*
Try DeFuniak, then go to all the
other points in Florida, and returning
to DeFuniak, you will say as all others
have said, this is the most delightful
spot I have found in the state."
*
Here is a chance to mix a little in-
tellectual up-lift with your winter out-
ing. The lectures, concerts and en-
tertainments are as worthy of patron-
age as can be found at any Chautauqua
in the nation.

The Hotel Chautauqua is a superb
building with all the modern improve-
ments. Baths, electric bells, ample
verandas, airy and well-furnished
rooms, and a table which thoroughly
satisfies.
***
Mornings can be devoted to pleasant
rides in ox-carts to Lake Stanley and
other points of interest near DeFuniak.
This is a mode of conveyance distinct-
ively Floridian. It is fun. You ought
to try it.
*
The social atmosphere at DeFuniak
is its chief charm. Many of the best
people from 20 states of the union fill
the cottages and crowd the hotels.
Frequent receptions are held which
are seasons of rare enjoyment.

Through the kindness of Ludden &
Bates, of Savannah, Ga., we have this
year the famous Mathushek Piano.
It is one of the best. It has large sale
in the South, and Ludden & Bates are
the sole agents.

The peach and pear trees will be
hanging full of bloom during the ses-
sion of the assembly. How delightful
to leave the snow banks of the North,
and in 36 hours find yourself midst the


flowers and blossoms of opening
spring.

DeFuniak is unquestionably the
most healthful spot in Florida. It
stands on a high ridge, 20 miles from
the Gulf of Mexico. Its elevation is
300 feet. The atmosphere is bracing
and invigorating, not enervating and
depressing, as in many points in
Florida. The water is clear, spark-
ling and delicious. It comes from hid-
den springs deep in the earth and is
not the brackish surface water found
at so many other points.

Out of deference to the Normal
School, which seeks to crowd its work
into the morning hours, during the
session of the Chautauqua, and out of
deference as well to the judgement of
a few of the members of the board of
the Florida Chautauqua, it has been
decided to have no morning lectures
during the coming session of the as-
sembly. We hope that those in whose
interest this change has been made
and who complained of being a little
crowded by the lectures in the past,
will show their appreciation of this
new movement by faithful attendance
in the afternoon and evening. The
devotional services and class work will
fill the morning hours. Possibly there
is such a thing as being overcrowded,
but the experience of the Superintend-
ent of Instruction has been that assem-
blies which are not run at a "white
heat" all the time, never awaken much
enthusiasm, nor are they counted very
successful.


At VARIETY STORE

Are Goods not kept
any where else in the city.
East half brick block. JAS. NIPE, Prop.,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.



F. M. HOYT


CONTRACTOR AND

BUILDER .-


Good Work.


Lowest Prices,


PlaRs a1d Speciflcatioqs on Short Notice.


DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.


z


211.116-- 1 4









2THEW rL '1dm)A CHlAUTAtUQUA ,


FACTS ABOUT DeFUNIAK.

" O place like DeFuniak Springs in
Small Florida!" exclaim her hearty
dwellers and cheeryvisitors, who come
again and again to her delightful bor-
ders; and with reason, for her charming
nooks combine in greater completeness
than any other spot in her bright do-
main, pure water, invigorating atmos-
phere, and a clear sky. It has the high-
est altitude of any winter resort in the
state, and is charmingly situated on
the southern spur of the Blue Ridge,
which gradually slopes
away from the Carolinas
to the Gulf.
It has been happily styl-
ed the "Adirondacks of
Western Florida," for her
streams are as clear and
bright as those in the north-
ern mountains of New York
and her crystal lakes are
as pure and sparkling as
Lake George or the Saran-
acs. In fact, her "great
spring," in the very heary
of the town, one mile in
circumference and eighty
feet deep, with white rim
and sloping banks sur-
rounded by pines and oaks,
is unrivaled.


Nature must have been in
one of her serenest moods
while arrangingthe climate
and, attractive surround-
ings that are assisting in
making DeFuniak Springs
famous. LakeI). Fu!iak ;-,
as charming a little gem as
was ever furnished with an
emerald setting. The high, :--'7
rolling lands, by which it
isentirelysurroundedgrad-
ually slopeing toward the
silvery beach that forms a
frame-like margin, while
the pine forests with their .-
resonant, health-giving
odors, have had the under-
grow'tli leaneded out until
they have been converted
into lines of -hady avenues, through
tlhe reetC b.o-wer, of which the warm
sunshine plays hide and seek with the
shadows at the feet of the pines, while
numerous charming residences, with
their pretty surroundings can be seen
through the openings.
Beautiful homes of modern and tasty
architecture stand all about the rim of
the basin in which lies the gem of a
lake, or are scattered through the vast


pine forests which stretch away into
the distance. Here are stores fully
equipped to satisfy every possible need
of the customer. Express and tele-
graph offices; a trunk line of railroad,
dropping its passengers at the gate of
the Chautauqua grounds, with splendid
express trains, and through sleeping
car connections to all points. DeFuni-
ak is on a high ridge of gravel land,
midway between Tallahassee and Pen-
sacola, also the half way point between
Jacksonville and New Orleans, on the
Louisville&Nashville R.R. and twenty


DR. m). L. DAVIDSON -
SUPERINTENDENT FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.

miles from the Gulf. It is 300 feet above
its level. Malaria cannot climb to this
height, and mosquitoes are an entirely
unknown quantity. The water is un-
questionably the best in Florida and
has accomplished wonders in kidney
and other troubles. Finely equipped
hotels and multitudes of private cot-
tages open their hospitable doors at
reasonable rates to tourists.
. But the glory of this famous resort is


its Chautauqua. Here for five weeks
every year, from the middle of Febru-
ary to late March, a splendid program
of lectures, music and schools is carried
on, in which only the best talent in the
country is used. Every day is crowded
with the best things. Continued rest
and inactive idling soon grows irksome.
How delightful to have close at hand a
splendid lecture or a grand concert, to
fill an hour and relieve the tediousness.
A vacation without an intellectual up-
lift is a bit of precious time wasted.
A season at this natural health-giv-
ing Winter Resort, where
religious, intellectual, mor-
al and social culture can be
promoted under such favor-
able conditions; where you
can touch elbows with those
who stand on historic cen-
turies, is here brought with-
in reach of all. Here plea-
sure and profit are happily
combined, at minimum ex-
pense. Seven to ten dollars
week will meet everyneed-
ed expense. Nothing could
be cheaper. No studied
attention is given to dress.
You will find it an elegant
place to wear out your old
clothes.
Halls are scattered about
the grounds where class
work is conducted in a doz-
en different departments.
The voice of mirth & laugh-
ter is heard every where.
Young men and maidens
are busy with ball, croquet
or tennis. Earnest students
with pencil and paper are
gathering thoughts and
instruction for future days
Old men and old women
long out of school, and de-
nied many literary advan-
tages, listen with open-eyed
.. wonder to the rare lectures
and the delightful concerts.
Such as the Florida Chau-
tauqua. Four weeks crowd-
ed full of the best thinks
genius can desire or money procure; an
oasis in life's desert; an inspiration for
all days to come. Can you afford to
miss it? The program has been arran-
ged with the greatest care and it is
confidently believed will satisfy the
masses. Music has been made a lead-
ing feature, and only the best has been
secured. Then too the spectacular has
not been over-looked.
You can not afford to miss a day.


_ I 1 I~- A


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r-~2

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S. i E "2








13


T[M rLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.


POINTERS FOR TRAVELERS.

Direct Routes to DeFuniak, Times of Trains, Rates, &c.


.9 ~THE LOUISVILLE
L| I C& N & NASHVILLE R.
& N ) R. has made low
~886 rates to DeFuni-
ak and return from all points on its
lines. Those desiring sleeper accom-
modations through to DeFuniak leave
Cincinnati at night. From St. Louis
DeFuniak passengers should take the
night train.
Cheap round trip rates are as follows:


Cincinnati......... $2500
Frankfort ........ 2400
Owensboro......... 2235
Lexington.......... 2400
Shelbyville........ 2406
Louisville...........22 225
Bowling Green... 22 25
Nashville,Tenn. 2125
Decatur ............. 1700
Calera................ 1200
Gadsden ........... 16 30
Talladega ......... 1420
Birmingham, Al 1355
Montgomery ..... 975
Evansville, Ind.. 2225
St. Louis, Mo..... 25 00
Mobile.............. 735


New Orleans......$1300
Flomaton, Fla.... 474
Pensacola.......... 343
McDavid............ 443
Pine Barton....... 4 24
Moline ............. 411
Milton.............. 273
Holts ................ 1 89
Milligan ............ 159
Crestview........... 142
Argyle .............. 45
Ponce DeLeon.... 79
Westville.......... 96
Caryville ......... 105
Chipley......... 173
Cottondale ......... 212
Mariana............. 249


River Junction................... $3 53
Rates from Flomaton and Florida
points include 25 cent admission.
Special round trip tickets will be on
sale February 16, till March 19, and
will be good to return till April 10th.
Round trip tickets on sale at all sta-
tions on L. & N. R. R. From promi-
nent stations they are on sale after
November 1, good for all winter at low
rates.
For folder and all information ad-
dress C. P. ATMORE, G. P. A., Louis-
ville, Ky.


FLORIDA CENTRAL AND
PENINSULAR R.R.

For a trip intp Central and Southern
Florida from DeFuniak Springs the
best route is by the Florida Central and
Peninsular Railway. The evening train
from DeFuniak has through sleeper
via this route to Jacksonville. which
makes close connections for the Mt.
Dora Assembly, Tampa, and all points
in Southern Florida. This is also the
route from Jacksonville, Fla., to De
Funiak. You certainly should not end
your vacation until you have seen the
tropical splendors of Central and South-
ern Florida. For folders, Florida map,
time tables, etc., address A. O. MAC-
DONELL, Jacksonville, Fla.


Eclipses Them All


* 352 HOURS 1


Clhicago o Jacksonville, Fla.

T HE lMONON ROUTE with its custo-
mary enterprise has put on a new fast
train that makes the run between Chi-
cago and Jacksonville in 35% hours.
This train is composed of elegant Pullman
Perfected Safely Vestibuled, Open and Com-
partment Sleepers, including Drawing-room
and Buffet Sleepers as well as comfortable day
coaches, with Monon Celebrated High-back
seats.
This train leaves Chicago daily at 8:32 p. m.,
arriving at ( incionati next morning 7:30, Chat-
tanooga 5:50 p, m., Atlanta 10:40 p. m., reaching
Jacksonville at 8:20 tlfe second morning, in
ample time to m: ke co, section with all lines
for points in Central and Southern Florida.
This is the fastest time ever made by any
line between Chicago and Florida.
Frank J. Reed, General Passenger Agent,
Chicago.
City Ticket Office, 232 Clark St., Chicago.
For time cards, pamphlets and all other in
formation, address E. L. Sessions, N. W.
Pass singer :,-.. : 1....' I -,Minn.


Grand Rapids and Indiana j
SrC Railway.4" |

From Central and West Michigan points
the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railway brings
passengers into the Louisville & Nash-
ville station at Cincinnati, making
close connection with trains for De-
Funiak Springs. Full information can
be had by addressing C. L. LOCKWOOD,
Gen. Pass. Agent, Grand Rapids, Mich.



& *

The New Baltimore & Ohio trains between
Cincinna i, Washington and New York
are beautie.. New Pullman cars of the
latest pat ern and finest workmanship,
supplied with every convenience of
modern travel. Safety, speed and com-
fort are the three words which charac-
terize the magnificent equipment.
Through fast trains from New York
and St. Louis connect in Union Station
Cincinnati with L. & N. R. R. trains for
DeFuniak. Address,
CHAS. O. SCULL, Baitini:,re. Md.


XI THE CHICAGOAND
AST.EN ILLINOIS
R. R. is the most
.........* direct route from
Chicago to Florida points, leaving Chi-
cago in the evening and reaching Nash-
ville in time for the morning train
south, on the Louisville & Nashville
Railway, arriving at DeFuniak at 11:30
a. m. the second morning out. Through
sleeping car accommodations and
splendid service. Vestibuled trains,
gas lighted and equipped with every
new device. This is the best route in
connection with the L. & N. out of
Chicago for the south. The new train
schedule provides the quickest and fin-
est train service ever maintained be-
tween Chicago and the South.
Cheap excursion rates from all sta-
tions.
For rates and folders address CHAS.
L. STONE, G.P. A., Chicago,Ill., or CITY
TICKET OFFICE, 230 Clark St Chicago.


The Savannah, Florida and
|L-Western R. R.'4

The S. F. & W. Ry., via River Junction,
is the way to reach DeFuniak from all
points in Georgia, South Carolina and
points in the North East. Splendid
service is offered. For full particulars
and folders address, B. W. WREIW, G.
P. A., Savannah, Ga.


A GOOD WAY
TO LEARN----=a-as

The Facts about DeFuniak Springs
is to subscribe for its

-- Leading Newspaper--
All about the Chautauqua, the Hun ing,
Fishing, Climate, etc.
$1 per Year, 6 Weeks for ioc.
Daily during the Chautauqua, 15c. per
week.

"THE BREEZE,"
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.



6. P. HEN Y, M.D. -
OFFICE: West Florida Land Co's Bdg.
RESIDENCE: 13th Street.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.


I


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-- r ~ u.:;;i.:~srl r~._; ;:; :,xjaj"l5^







14 THE FLORIDA CHAUTAUQUA.
F _________________________________________________


PERSONAL.

Mrs. A. H. Gillet is doing splendid
work and making hosts of friends as
the Secretary of the Young Woman's
Christian Association in Jackson, Mich-
igan.
Through the earnest work of Col. W.
D. Chipley, West Florida made a splen-
did showing at the Atlanta Exposition.
Multitudes join in heartiest congrat-
ulations to our very efficient Secretary
Mr. T. F. McGburin who has taken to
himself a wife. We shall now love
"two" instead of one, and trust that
the gallantry which used to be dis-
played by the genial Secretary to all
young ladies visiting the Florida Chau-
tauqua, will be no less demonstrative,
if a trifle less sincere.
Some new and beautiful houses have
been built atDeFuniak during theyear.
The many friends of Rev. C. E. Fel-
ton, D.D., will rejoice to know that he
is enjoying a fair degree of health.
To see him and his good wife, and to
have a glimpse of their beautiful home
is well worth a trip to Florida.
Mrs. French Sheldon,who so charmed
every body by her work last year, is
busily engaged in writing a history of
the South. We have a partial promise
that she will look in on us during the
session of the Chautauqua, and possibly
give us one of her delightful talks.
When planning for a summer vaca-
tion, study well the advantages of
Mountain Lake Park, Maryland. It is
the most superb and sensible summer
resort in America. 800 acres of wonder-
ful mountain land on the summit of
the Alleghenies, 2800 feet above sea
level. The views are beyond descrip-
tion. Five splendid hotels and multi-
tudes of cottages open their doors to
tourists at reasonable rates. Twenty
departments of important school work
are in session in August, and one of the
best Chautauqua programs presented
in America is directed by Dr. W. L.
Davidson.
Our usual popular 50 cent Saturday
excursion will be run during the con-
tinuance of the Assembly. Such men
as Hon. Roswell G. Horr the greatest
political debater of the decade, a man
who has never yet been vanquished.
Jas. S. Burdette, the famous New York
Humorist, Prof. Louis Favour, the
great electrician, with tons of appar-
atus andbrilliant experiments. Harry
S. Riggs, the phenominal histler and
the famous Arion' Lady Quartette of
Chicago, the very best in the nation,
will be among the attractions. Then
we shall have Rogers Band, Dr.' Palmer
and Chorus, many popular soloists,and
Stereopticon views. What more could
you ask? Excursion trains will leave
after the evening entertainment, giv-
ing you the full day to enjoy the great
programs at the Florida Chautauqua.
Hon. Wallace Bruce and wife spent
some time in Scotland during the sum-
mer. Mr. Bruce made such a name for
himself as a public speaker during his
residence in Scotland that he is always
in demand on great occasions, and a
little journey of 3000 miles across the
Atlantic to meet an engagement, is


hardly an incident, to a man with the
pushand energy possessed by Mr. Bruce.
Miss Victoria Hnlse whose sweet voice
we should again like to hear on our plat-
form, has for some time been enjoying
exceptional musical advantages in New
York city. We hope she will come our
way this winter.
The Daily "Breeze" published during
the session of the Chautauqua, deserves
the patronage of everybody. Editor
Storrs is a hustler.
All our advertisers are in every way
thoroughly reliable. Study our columns
find what you want, then go and get it.
We are grateful to our advertisers, who
make possible, in part, the printing of
this handsome programme.
SLet this year be the banner year of
the Florida Chautauqua. We need the
help of every resident of DeFuniak
Springs. TheChautauquameans much
to you and your town in every way.
Take it away and you would miss it
sadly. Unless our receipts increase,
and our pressing obligations are met,
the enterprise may ''go to the wall."
You should feel a personal responsibi-
lity in the matter.. Every citizen of De
Funiak should purchase a season ticket.
It costs but little. It will bring you
all it costs, and'mnch more, in intellect-
ual enjoyment, and you besides make
possible the life of the town in which
you live and ought to love. Don't ex-
pect the tourists to do it all. The bur-
den of all remains with you. 500
season tickets should be sold in DeFu-
niak alone. Stand by this enterprise.



GitU Market

FRESH MEflTS

VEGETlBLES.
LOWEST PRICES. .

S. f. GAWTHON, Prop.,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.


L. t. StuDbs' Bakeru.
Co0lfectionlerg al .Cllnc Startd.
CENTRAL LOCATION.
DPFUNIAK SPRINGS. FLORIDA.

G. A. WALTHER
has just opened a new
stock of

general MerGlandlse

and respectfully solicits your patron-
age. His goods are carefully
selected and will be
sold cheap.
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.


M1FRTITN IOUSE
....B ALDWIN AYENUE....
Quiet and home-like. Meals at all hours.
Prices Moderate.
jrA. N. 5. JrIpII5, peiPROIEOR ,
DE PUNIAK SPRINGS. PLA.

J. L. CAMPBELL
COUNTY JUDGE
and Ex-officio Justice of the Peace,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS.


DR. G. fl. LfNDRUM
-DRUG STORE,-.
DEALn R IN
Drugs, Medicines and Fancu Goods,
DsFUNIAK SPRINGS. FLA.

MRS. H. W. WHEELER,

lo0IEoPfl]Illli PltYIcllll
Residence: rnacle. DeFuniak Springs.

F Q. TERVIN,

lae BUILDERS' MATERIAL.
Lumber Furnished on Short Notice.
Prices Low.
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

VISITORS
Will find it to their interest
to call at my
STABLES
mHEN O)ANTING
A G-OOD TURNOUT.

Everything First-Class. Charges Reasonable.
Satisfaction Guaranteed or money refunded.
B. F. COCKROFT,
DEFUNIAJK SPRINGS, FLA.


Daniel Campbell,

fttorneu at Law and
Solicitor in Ghanceru

Prompt attention to all busi-
ness intrusted to his care.

De Funiak Springs, Fla.


J. M. HELMS, --

Furiture, RitllIlr l1oveo
TrunKs,. &c.itLy u o sortnoic
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.


I "I







THE FLORIDA CHAUTAIUOQUA. 15


City Barber Shop
Comnplete and Reliable.

JOS. W. WILSON, Prop. "eF''untk Sprin. Flo .

Samuel Woodinglon 4

Unertnaker EimDalimer


Charges Reasonable.


DeFuniak Springs. Fla.


JOHN CHISHOLM

W tllmalfer A Jwl66er
Repairing a Specialty.
Brick Store, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.

HOTEL
6HIIUThUQUtR

' ConvenieQt,
Complete and
Refitted. -w ..-


Best service for the money.
Rates $2 to $3 per day.
SpiI., ai rate for family
or guests staying
III n. For
particulars
address

A. J. GRIFFIN, Prop.,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.




EDDY HiS IT

Anything you want in
General Merchandise
Choice' Groceries, Can-
Sned Goods, Vegetables,
S Dry Go61:d s, Shoes, Hats,
Umbrellas, Notions,Tih-
ware, Hardware, Etc.,
at down in the cellar
prices.
Near Post Office, "
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.


The DeFuniak Herald
; UNSURPASSED AS AS.
Advertising Mledium
RATES REASONABLE.
PFTr i'N K .F FNGS isa -a .r. p. .ul. r ~. ; l., r
r I -t **t .-iled a l' i l II IL..u a !..
.! !,..-*.l'l r...n tlie N..Ln .nd n l ast. These
v!i*r..rc 1. :i r11.1 rr tl I it. HERALD, there-
f.." a : t 1r. !,i .r c Ui i I... -dvertising six or
.eight States.
For rates or (c.li. ." .i n!.. .ri n address,
NImROD mDcGUIRE.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

E. R. SPRAGUE

Insurance Agent,
AMERICAN FIRE OF PHILADELPHIA,
CONTINENTAL OF NEW YORK.
DeFuniae Springs, Fla.

WALTER L. HELMS,

HHUTiUQUg BAiRBERR USOP....
N A r I c_...., a r d
.:iurie.:.u ,, 3~ ,nii I .
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.

A. .J WATKINS,
'.... DEALER IN ....

Fisi, GstErs' 7 eg0lablIs

Will call at your doo i
wi th :-supplies every
Morning. resh sup-
Splies dL il . .


Prices Modrate.


DeFuniak Springs. Fla.


The ~ToaG'qnia1i

~/7UgitzeJ3 G urg-e

p 7ro 7 0oo9 4, wh o h a z re -
cenily loataed here, uill/ive lessons
ti ~--; 1;.IJ~.' : P lain,
and ornanIenaZl PennoalhAiP; also
6,.. :brmE, e06er r/0ri!i
and- Gommorcial f FU

notice_ Card wri5inp a
For tcrmo address
;' F 00ok


BUY FROM THE MAKER."

MatIM 6lM!
The Piano for a lifetime and the
t great Southern favorite.

i MathusI6k!
S We sell it lower than any other
Hfgh irade Pliano.

The New Improved Mathushek
I 'HE original and only genu-
T ine Mathushek made by the
Mathushek Piano Co., of
New Haven, Conn. Organized
1866. Over 30,000 now in use.
Sold by us for twenty-five years
_past, and placed in thousands of
Southern homes.

Only One Profit From Maker to Purchase
W TE have an interest in the
I manufacture of this
piano and thus save all
intermediate profits. Write for
Factory Prices.

LUDDE]\N BPEfiT
SAVANNAH, GA.
Ai MATIUSHEK PIANOS are used at the De
Funiak Chautauqua.
Ir *... ..*--fl o.n ....nf.. *




(Formerly Cawthon House).
Best location in city. All the
conviences of a well ap-
pointed home. Rates S1.00
per day. Proportionate rate
by week or month.

DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA.



MCLEOD! MARKET
CENTRALLY LOCATED.
FRESH MEATS,
VEGETABLES,
FISH, ETC.

PRICES REASONABLE.
We make friends of customers. Give us a trial.
DAN'L McLEOD PROP.







I TI[-1L PrLt I'[, CMI.UT.M"'.I A..


AT THE OPERA HOUSE STORE!

Visitors ard Ly
and Lowest ...
R sider)s LPrices on .......
Residents r uoods
NOTIONS, CLOTHING, HATS, SHOES,
GROCERIES, PRODUCE OF ALL KINDS,
HARDWARE, TINWARE, STOVES, FURNITURE, &c.

W. L..CAWTHON & CO'S,


Free and Prompt Deliiery.
Checks Cashed and Exchange Sold.


KIN, KIN & Co. Dr.J. McLANE,
i r . P u t l i n I. I l i .1 ..I-.-
Rsideice. N l0ion AvF C Le block east


DEALERS IN---


IURNITURE



And everything to be found in a First-class
General Store.
C..utt Pr.....h.? a iSpo1. if- ,.

WE LEAD. ,r-EPs FC.LL.:,W
I, F .. .. L l i,.-' 'i

PATRONIZE 'IE NE"l ____ VL_
EXPRESS

alu cluill c di PiiUi-'llptty.
W. J. ADAMS, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.

D. C. CAMPBELL
Real .-L1t.- Life, Fir-. A...i.llt
Insurance and Rental Agent,
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.

M.. 3F'. C O 3ET-:EL-.A-. MT
W, r.-r:H-10 [1.ER
ir..-j .IEWELER

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS. FLA.


.I' C(O ult HOU i,.
I, ,.,;.,: "i. i -. F la.

cBRuniak rings' BNus6.
A Homelike. -. --
Neat.\ Furnished lMostler%.
Everything First-Class.
Open the Year Round.
RATES REASONABLE.

MlR, T, M, KING, Preop[kiikssi,
DEFUNIAK SPRING. FLA.

---- ................

New York House
RE-OPENED

IN L\\ furnish.: c and re-
1 it t ii, . First
-[..'- _- a c Ill, 1 i ., '' l ) in s,

I :i t_', !- i.iil forper-
it 1 i .iii ,i l iiughouti



IJ. SIOTT, Pop.
DeFuniak Spring., Fla.


DeFlniak prfnls, FlaO


Equitable
Life
Assurance
Society
of the U. S.,
120 Broadway, New York.
-
Largest, strongest, most
liber.il I. f. Company in the
world. Stt, iu- i. jid.l l l-, .l
Crs over '.". ', . '. A r,t
for rit :. ., .to
KNOWLES BROS., Gen'l Agents
PENSACOLA, FLA.
Also Representing Leading Fire Insurance
Companies.

XAL. C. BLACK
Carpenter, Joiner.
SContractor and Builder,
Estimates on
Short Notice. )eFutniaIk Springs, Fla.



uits$2O! PaRI$5Is
Or COURSE you have
your Clothes Made to
.rdelr. Then write us for

GOuSlo FOr L'3T -ES.

KosEi nll Tailorina Go.
PENSACOLA. FLA.


__ L PiF~- ~P~?r-- I i~---T- 7 ~ i-


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