Maps and Master List, Stripping Area 8

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Maps and Master List, Stripping Area 8
Series Title:
Monson Motor Lodge Project
Uniform Title:
Monson Motor Lodge Project
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Publisher:
Planning and Building Department, City of St. Augustine, FL
Physical Location:
Folder: SA12

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Saint Augustine (Fla.)
32 Avenida Menendez (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Monson Motor Lodge (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 32 Avenida Menendez

Notes

General Note:
includes notes on the excavations of Stripping Area 12

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
B3; B4
System ID:
USACH00405:00041

Full Text





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Stripping Area 12

On April 9, 2003, the city investigated the area of an exposed north-south oriented coquina stone wall. The wall paralleled Charlotte Street and had been exposed by the tractor hoe while demolishing the floor pad to the old Monson Motor Lodge.

The exposed wall was 6.4 m long by 44/48 cm wide, with an abutting wall at the north end. No abutting/bonded wall was found at the south end of the north-south wall, and all indications suggests that the north-south wall had been disturbed by construction of one of the Monson Hotels during the 20th century. Soil deposits at the south end of the north-south wall contained abundant rubble debris.

The north-south wall (herein labeled as Feature 171) was composed of two distinct building materials: coquina stone and tabby (see map). The coquina stone portion was found extending from the south end roughly 4.3 m north, where it was replaced with tabby that extended 3.9 m. Both the coquina stone and tabby sections of the wall were found to occurred atop a dense deposit of shell (mainly oyster) that was placed into a trench (50 cm wide at the top and 55 cm wide at the base) that was roughly 30 cm deep (see map). This type of wall building technique, where tabby and coquina stone are used interchangeably, has been documented at the O'Reilly House.

Two abutting walls were found along the eastside of Feature 171: a coquina stone wall at the north end and a tabby wall (see map). The coquina stone wall was about 40 cm in width and appears to have been built atop a shell foundation lens. The depth of this lens was not determined, given that this area along the wall had not been cleared of rubble-laden overburden by the tractor hoe; only a small 50 to 60 cm wide area was exposed of this wall. The tabby wall also was about 40 cm in width an had been constructed over a shell lens. Whether this tabby wall continued for any extent could not be determined given that the tractor hoe had disturbed this section considerably. Given the short distance between the coquina and tabby abutments (1.5 m), the tabby may have been some type of short reinforcement feature. This was the area where Feature 171 changed from coquina stone construction to tabby construction.

Exposure of areas to the east and west of Feature 171 revealed a thin lens of tabby/coquina sand, which is similar to road deposits found along St. George





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Street as well as gun deck (terreplain) surfaces at Castillo. This deposit was particularly pronounced west of Feature 171, but appeared to be spotty east of the wall. This suggests that Feature 171 had been constructed atop the roadbed of Charlotte Street during the colonial era. Although no ceramic information was recovered for Feature 171, which could date the structure, ceramics from fill deposits above the road and within the road place its construction sometime during the mid-1700s. As such, the structure (as represented by Feature 171 and its abutment walls) would be late colonial in origin.

Discovery of the colonial surface to Charlotte Street necessitated an area be opened (stripping area 12) and an exploratory test pit (TU 1) to expose a section of the street and established the nature of soil deposits that bounded the street. The stripping area measured roughly 4.4 m (n-s) by 65 cm (e-w) and was bounded by Feature 171 and the wooden fence constructed along the curb line of present day Charlotte Street. Because the street (as represented by a tabby-coquina lens) had not been disturbed, it provided a sealed deposit for earlier occupations that may have occurred in this section of town. The test unit measured 1.45 m (n-s) by 65 cm (e-w) and was within the stripping area 12. Except for the area of TUI, the overburden atop the street was simply tossed to expose the surface.

Excavation of this test unit (label TU 1, SA 12) uncovered 9 distinct soil strata (see profile). The upper 15 cm of soil was removed to expedite excavation, however, two soil deposits were present: a modern disturbed zone and a deposit of coquina within a brown sandy-loam. The lower deposit is labeled as #0 on the profile. The next layer was a zone of brown (medium grain) sandy loam with some coquina debris. This zone (#1) is considered to represent either 19th century fill deposits or a roadbed. Dirt streets were common in the 1800s. The next level (#2) is the tabby-coquina street. The road surface varies from 1 to 2 cm thick. Beneath the road was a layer of brown (fine-grain) sand that overlaid a compacted earthen surface. This deposit (#3) is considered to represent an earlier roadbed of Charlotte Street onto which aeolian (windblown) sands accumulated. This deposit was found to occur atop a layer of grayish (medium-grain) sand with some shell debris (#4), which may represent fill used to elevate the road surface. The next layer (#5) was a zone of dark grayish-brown (fine/medium grain) sand. This zone is considered to represent general cultural midden deposits, and is not considered to be part of historic Charlotte Street. Zone (#5) was stopped when charcoal fleks and smears became evident. The next level (#6) was





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thin (about 2 to 3 cm) and was composed of dark gray, organic fine sand with abundant small charcoal debris. This zone may be associated with the 1702 siege of St. Augustine, given the presence of charcoal. The final layer of cultural debris, before culturally sterile yellow sands is a zone composed of either gray or dark brown (medium grain) sands with some shell. This layer is considered to represent the initial occupation of this part of town. The gray deposits, which primarily occur toward the south end of the test unit may represent fill, whereas the dark brown may be evidence of vegetation prior to urbanization. At this lowest level, the soil was fairly wet and difficult to screen. It should be noted that all material within SA 12, TU1 was dry screened through a quarter inch mesh and that material was taken to the lab and wet screened.





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