St. Augustine National Cemetery

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
St. Augustine National Cemetery
Series Title:
St. Augstine National Cemetery
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 1SW6
Divider: Cemeteries + Burials
Folder: Cemeteries + Burials

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Saint Augustine (Fla.)
104 Marine Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
St. Augustine National Cemetery (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 104 Marine Street

Notes

General Note:
VA Pamphlet 40-15; GPO:1975 O-210-851 (507)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
USACH00002:00009

Full Text





















ST. AUGUSTINE NATIONAL CEMETERY
104 Marine Street
St. Augustine, Florida 32084

Although the St. Augustine burial ground was not
designated a National Cemetery until the latter half
of the 19th century, this hallowed plot of land played
a role in the entire, colorful history of the oldest city
in the United States.
In the days of the first Spanish colony of St.
Augustine, a Franciscan monastery and convent stood
near the south end of the city. The land which is now
the National Cemetery was a part of the property
held by the religious community. The southern
boundary of the present-day cemetery marks the
periphery of the old Spanish walled city.
Under the English rule of Florida (1763-1783), the
convent was occupied by the military and barracks
were constructed on the site. During the second
Spanish occupation of Florida (1783-1821) the
property remained in the hands of the military.
When the United States gained possession of
Florida in 1821, the St. Francis Barracks housed the
military of the third nation to stand guard over the
city, already 3 centuries old. Shortly after, land at the
Barracks was set aside for a post cemetery. According
to the old burial records, the first interment took
place in 1828.


The greatest number of early interments were
those of the soldiers who died during the Florida
Indian Wars, either on the battlefield or due to the
sickness and disease which were not uncommon in this
sub-tropical climate.
The Seminole Indians resisted the mass emigra-
tion to the West imposed upon the tribes by the
United States government. Seven years of war
followed the signing of the deportation treaties.
On December 23, 1835, Major Francis L. Dade
with 108 men and officers began the journey from
Fort Brook (Tampa) to offer reinforcement to
General Wiley Thompson stationed at Fort King
(Ocala).
His sense of geography confused, Dade announced
to his men on the 28th that they had passed the
danger zone. He failed to take precautions to send an
advance or flank guard. The heavy winter garments of
the soldiers covered their weapons, so that when the
Seminoles staged an attack, Dade's men were virtually
crippled. Only one soldier survived to recount the
battle.
A few months later, when travel in the area was
again possible, a command under General Gaines
came up from Tampa and buried the fallen men on
the site of the massacre.
In 1842, when hostilities ceased, it was proposed
to transfer the remains of the men who fell with
Major Dade, and of all those who died within the







territory, to one burial ground. Reinterment, with
proper ceremonies, took place at the St. Augustine
post cemetery, where 3 pyramids of native coquina
stone were erected in memory of the soldiers who
fought in the Florida Wars.
Nearby, several plain, white marble markers desig-
nate the graves of Indian scouts.
In the early 1860's the nation anticipated the
effects of seemingly irreconcilable dissent in the
government. In St. Augustine, sentiment was divided.
By 1845, when Florida became the 27th State in the
Union, the city was quickly developing as a modern
resort, offering a warm climate and a contrasting
Latin culture especially attractive to northern visitors.
When, in January of 1861, the State of Florida
seceded from the Union, Confederate troops raised
the fourth flag to fly over the city. Fort Marion and
the St. Francis Barracks were appropriated by the
new army.
The city suffered greatly from the interruption of
trade. In March of 1862, a Federal gunboat, the
Wabash, entered St. Augustine harbor and the mayor
of the city surrendered rather than attempt a surely
devastating battle. St. Augustine again became part of
the Union and never reverted to Confederate hands
during the course of the war.
It was during the Civil War, in 1862, that President
Lincoln approved legislation which provided, "the
President of the United States shall have power,
whenever in his opinion it shall be expedient, to
purchase cemetery grounds and cause them to be
securely enclosed, to be used as a national cemetery
for the soldiers who shall die in the service of the
country." From this original law, composed with
only experiences of the present civil conflict in mind,
evolved the National Cemetery-System. Today, not
only those who die on active duty, but all men and
women who have honorably served their country in
the armed forces, are provided a secure and fitting
resting place in one of the many national cemeteries
across the nation.
In 1881, St. Augustine was once again a
flourishing city and the commanding officer at the St.
Francis Barracks recognized the need to assure the
proper care and respectful treatment of the old post
cemetery. That same year, Brevet Brigadier General
Meigs proposed these measures:


"As Florida is now a resort of many thousands
of citizens with their families in search of
benefit from its mild winter climate, it will be
only becoming to put this cemetery, too long
neglected and lately fallen into decay, into as
good condition as the other national military
cemeteries."
General Meigs suggested that the old post burial
grounds be declared a National Cemetery, thereby
making repair funds available from the appropriation
for national cemeteries, and The Adjutant General's
office concurred.
It was also proposed at this time to erect a
monument to the soldiers who died in the Florida
Wars-a tall white obelisk to stand before the three
pyramids-the cost of which would be met by a
donation of one day's pay from each soldier stationed
at the Barracks.
A wall of coquina was constructed to properly
enclose the cemetery. In 1912 and 1913, additional
land from the military reservation was set apart for
the expansion of the cemetery, nearly doubling its
size.
Over the years further measures have been taken
to preserve the distinctive atmosphere that permeates
the old Spanish town. In 1938 a new superintendent's
lodge was constructed according to designs approved
by the city council, which has always sought to
preserve the unique heritage of St. Augustine. Built of
coquina with an over-hanging balcony and weathered
shingle roof, the architecture is strictly in keeping
with the style of the old Spanish homes in the
historic district. A coquina rostrum, the stage for
Memorial Day, Veterans Day and other official
ceremonies, standing at the northern end of the
cemetery echoes the curving roofline silhouettes of
the Spanish Baroque style, seen in other prominent
structures in the city.
Here in the St. Augustine National Cemetery the
national colors fly, signifying that a grateful nation
honors in death those who served her during their
lives.
Today the cemetery remains a link between the
past and the present, reminding one of the first
colony and of its growth with a new nation, through
the courage and dedication of the men and women
buried here.





MARINE STREET


ST. AUGUSTINE

NATIONAL

CEMETERY

GROUNDS


T CHARLOTTE STREET


Name


Grave Section


General Information
1. Entrance gates will be open and visitors 5. Cut flowers may be placed on graves at any
permitted in the cemetery throughout the year time. Metal temporary flower containers are
during the following hours: permitted. Floral items will be removed from
graves as soon as they become faded and
8:00 aam. to 5:00 p.m. Everyday unsightly.
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Memorial Day
6. Artificial flowers may be placed on graves
2. Cemetery will not be used as picnic only during the period of October 10 through
grounds. April 15. Plantings, statues, vigil lights, glass
objects of any nature and any other type of
3. Visitors will not litter the grounds, cut, commemorative items are not permitted on
break or injure trees, shrubs or plants or graves at any time.
otherwise conduct themselves in a manner not
in keeping with the dignity and the sacredness 7. Please contact Superintendent's Office for
of the Cemetery. information regarding floral regulations and
installation of a permanent flower container.
4. All graves will be decorated on the work
day immediately preceding Memorial Day with 8. Approximate location of grave is indicated
small United States flags, which will be re- in red pencil.
moved on the first work day after Memorial
Day. Flags are not permitted on graves at any 9. Please bring all complaints to the attention
other time. of the Cemetery Superintendent.


VA Pamphlet 40-15, July 1975


a GPO : 1975 0 210-851 (507)











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Full Text




















ST. AUGUSTINE NATIONAL CEMETERY The greatest number of early interments were those of the soldiers who died during the Florida
104 Marine Street Indian Wars, either on the battlefield or due to the
St. Augustine, Florida 32084 sickness and disease which were not uncommon in this sub-tropical climate.
Although the St. Augustine burial ground was not The Seminole Indians resisted the mass emigradesignated a National Cemetery until the latter half tion to the West imposed upon the tribes by the of the 19th century, this hallowed plot of land played United States government. Seven years of war a role in the entire, colorful history of the oldest city followed the signing of the deportation treaties. in the United States. On December 23, 1835, Major Francis L. Dade
In the days of the first Spanish colony of St. with 108 men and officers began the journey from Augustine, a Franciscan monastery and convent stood Fort Brook (Tampa) to offer reinforcement to near the south end of the city. The land which is now General Wiley Thompson stationed at Fort King the National Cemetery was a part of the property (Ocala). held by the religious community. The southern His sense of geography confused, Dade announced boundary of the present-day cemetery marks the to his men on the 28th that they had passed the periphery of the old Spanish walled city. danger zone. He failed to take precautions to send an
Under the English rule of Florida (1763-1783), the advance or flank guard. The heavy winter garments of convent was occupied by the military and barracks the soldiers covered their weapons, so that when the were constructed on the site. During the second Seminoles staged an attack, Dade's men were virtually Spanish occupation of Florida (1783-1821) the crippled. Only one solidier survived to recount the property remained in the hands of the military. battle.
When the United States gained possession of A few months later, when travel in the area was Florida in 1821, the St. Francis Barracks housed the again possible, a command under General Gaines military of the third nation to stand guard over the came up from Tampa and buried the fallen men on city, already 3 centuries old. Shortly after, land at the the site of the massacre. Barracks was set aside for a post cemetery. According In 1842, when hostilities ceased, it was proposed to the old burial records, the first interment took to transfer the remains of the men who fell with place in 1828. Major Dade, and of all those who died within the





MARINE STREET
+ MEMORIAL SECTION

ST. AUGUSTINE
LODGE
SECTION C SECTION B NATIONAL SECTION B

CEMETERY
CEMETERY POST SECTION

GROUNDS "'H ....



SECTION E SECTION D SECTION A

ILDING

t CHARLOTTE STREET

Name Grave Section

General Information
1. Entrance gates will be open and visitors 5. Cut flowers may be placed on graves at any permitted in the cemetery throughout the year time. Metal temporary flower containers are during the following hours: permitted. Floral items will be removed from graves as soon as they become faded and 8:00 am. to 5:00 p.m. Everyday unsightly.
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Memorial Day
6. Artificial flowers may be placed on graves 2. Cemetery will not be used as picnic only during the period of October 10 through grounds. April 15. Plantings, statues, vigil lights, glass objects of any nature and any other type of 3. Visitors will not litter the grounds, cut, commemorative items are not permitted on
break or injure trees, shrubs or plants or graves at any time.
otherwise conduct themselves in a manner not
in keeping with the dignity and the sacredness 7. Please contact Superintendent's Office for of the Cemetery. information regarding floral regulations and installation of a permanent flower container.
4. All graves will be decorated on the work
day immediately preceding Memorial Day with 8. Approximate location of grave is indicated
small United States flags, which wiJl be re- in red pencil.
moved on the first work day after Memorial
Day. Flags are not permitted on graves at any 9. Please bring all complaints to the attention
other time. of the Cemetery Superintendent.

VA Pamphlet 40-15, July 1975 cGPO: 1175 210o-51 (507)

























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territory, to one burial ground. Reinterment, with "As Florida is now a resort of many thousands proper ceremonies, took place at the St. Augustine of citizens with their families in search of post cemetery, where 3 pyramids of native coquina benefit from its mild winter climate, it will be stone were erected in memory of the soldiers who only becoming to put this cemetery, too long fought in the Florida Wars. neglected and lately fallen into decay, into as
Nearby, several plain, white marble markers desig- good condition as the other national military nate the graves of Indian scouts. cemeteries."
In the early 1860's the nation anticipated the General Meigs suggested that the old post burial effects of seemingly irreconcilable dissent in the grounds be declared a National Cemetery, thereby government. In St. Augustine, sentiment was divided. making repair funds available from the appropriation By 1845, when Florida became the 27th State in the for national cemeteries, and The Adjutant General's Union, the city was quickly developing as a modern office concurred. resort, offering a warm climate and a contrasting It was also proposed at this time to erect a Latin culture especially attractive to northern visitors. monument to the soldiers who died in the Florida
When, in January of 1861, the State of Florida Wars-a tall white obelisk to stand before the three seceded from the Union, Confederate troops raised pyramids-the cost of which would be met by a the fourth flag to fly over the city. Fort Marion and donation of one day's pay from each soldier stationed the St. Francis Barracks were appropriated by the at the Barracks. new army. A wall of coquina was constructed to properly
The city suffered greatly from the interruption of enclose the cemetery. In 1912 and 1913, additional trade. In March of 1862, a Federal gunboat, the land from the military reservation was set apart for Wabash, entered St. Augustine harbor and the mayor the expansion of the cemetery, nearly doubling its of the city surrendered rather than attempt a surely size. devastating battle. St. Augustine again became part of Over the years further measures have been taken the Union and never reverted to Confederate hands to preserve the distinctive atmosphere that permeates during the course of the war. the old Spanish town. In 1938 a new superintendent's
It was during the Civil War, in 1862, that President lodge was constructed according to designs approved Lincoln approved legislation which provided, "the by the city council, which has always sought to President of the United States shall have power, preserve the unique heritage of St. Augustine. Built of whenever in his opinion it shall be expedient, to coquina with an over-hanging balcony and weathered purchase cemetery grounds and cause them to be shingle roof, the architecture is strictly in keeping securely enclosed, to be used as a national cemetery with the style of the old Spanish homes in the for the soldiers who shall die in the service of the historic district. A coquina rostrum, the stage for country." From this original law, composed with Memorial Day, Veterans Day and other official only experiences of the present civil conflict in mind, ceremonies, standing at the northern end of the evolved the National Cemetery-System. Today, not cemetery echoes the curving roofline silhouettes of only those who die on active duty, but all men and the Spanish Baroque style, seen in other prominent women who have honorably served their country in structures in the city. the armed forces, are provided a secure and fitting Here in the St. Augustine National Cemetery the resting place in one of the many national cemeteries national colors fly, signifying that a grateful nation across the nation. honors in death those who served her during their
In 1881, St. Augustine was once again a lives.
flourishing city and the commanding officer at the St. Today the cemetery remains a link between the Francis Barracks recognized the need to assure the past and the present, reminding one of the first proper care and respectful treatment of the old post colony and of its growth with a new nation, through cemetery. That same year, Brevet Brigadier General the courage and dedication of the men and women Meigs proposed these measures: buried here.