Florida Heritage House

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida Heritage House Historic St. Augustine
Series Title:
St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publisher:
Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board
Physical Location:
Box: 1SW6
Divider: [St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Saint Augustine (Fla.)
1 Aviles Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Wakeman (Heritage) House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 1 Aviles Street
Coordinates:
29.892097 x -81.311584

Notes

General Note:
4.71

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
B28-L1
System ID:
USACH00001:00005


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


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This is a reconstruction of a late Spanish colonial-
style house built in the early nineteenth century,
Later a building stood on this site known as the City
Hotel, owned bySeth M. Wakeman, a merchant from
Connecticut who also operated a grocery store in it.


Vrhen the twentieth century hotel structure was
being razed for reconstruction of the house, human
skeletons believed to be of Timucuan Indians were
discovered scattered about under the property. How
they came to be buried there and by whom remains
an unsolved mystery. It is assumed that either they
died during an epidemic or mayhave been killed in a
skirmishwith the Spaniards. The bodies wereburied
without much preparation, as they were stacked on
top of each other in some instances. A small por -
tion of the floor has been left open to allow the visi-
tor to view a part of this burial ground and the skele-
tal remains.


The wall panel accompanying the drawing of a Ti -
mucuan Indian explains some of the theories as to
why these bones of Florida's first inhabitants are in
that location.


Exhibits in the building are arranged in chronolo -
gical order, left to right, beginning with the Indian
cultures. First may be seen, in addition to the
burials, a brief history of Florida's Seminole In-
dians. Showcases contain typical clothing, dolls,



N .








baskets, a ceremonial rattle made from a whole tor-
toise shell, and other artifacts.


Next in order the visitor may see objects which
were part of Spanish life in-colonial St. Augustine,
recovered from excavated sites. A Spanish stirrup,
various types of hardware, and a large olive jar are
some examples.


Of particular interest to many is the Spanish coin
and gold collection recovered from early 18 c. ship-
wrecks along the Florida coast. The silver coins
were minted in the "New World" for shipment to Spain
and were called "reales". The gold pieces, which
were struck from gold bars, were called escudoss"
and "doblons". Both are in various denominations.
A curious item is a beautiful gold chain, in perfect
condition, which was found at the bottom of the sea
and which is still partly embedded in a piece of coral
just as it was discovered. The "sea diver's view",
with multi- level peep holes, allows the visitor, a
glimpse of the ocean's floor with other items which
were found there, just as the diver encountered them:
ingots, china cups, coins, chains, cannon balls, and
assorted hardware pieces can be identified.


In the center of the room a scale model of the
north section of the colonial city is a visual aid to
explain the extent of the program of restoring and
recreating America's birthplace, and gives a minia-.
ture view of how the 18th century city will appear
when complete.





.4










A tall showcase contains gifts presented to the
City of St. Augustine by Spanish governmental agen -
cies and cities, such as a replica of the 16th century
Spanish sword used by the city's founder, Pedro Men-
endez de Aviles, as well as bagpipes, medals, pho -
tographs, and other mementoes.



Additionalarticles of historic significance shown
in this building are an 18th century carved colonial
chest: memorabilia of St. Augustine's Flagler or
"Golden" Era, and a review of modern industry in
the city. The triangular kiosk illustrates the dif-
ferent aspects of the Historic-St. Augustine Preser -
vation Board's activities on its exterior panels, and
encloses a display of representative samples of hand -
crafts produced in its shops.



Owned and operated by:


HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


4.71


I

--



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* '...

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Historic.

%t.

cAugustinfQ


'. n 's ,... .- i ..*, "


NffIEIITA&BIE

IIcDTUJSIE


UIU


'' '
'
,i
, -;~Snr~









This is a reconstruction of a late Spanish colonial-
style house built in the early nineteenth century,
Later a building stood on this site known as the City
Hotel, owned bySeth M. Wakeman, a merchant from
Connecticut who also operated a grocery store in it.


Vrhen the twentieth century hotel structure was
being razed for reconstruction of the house, human
skeletons believed to be of Timucuan Indians were
discovered scattered about under the property. How
they came to be buried there and by whom remains
an unsolved mystery. It is assumed that either they
died during an epidemic or mayhave been killed in a
skirmishwith the Spaniards. The bodies wereburied
without much preparation, as they were stacked on
top of each other in some instances. A small por -
tion of the floor has been left open to allow the visi-
tor to view a part of this burial ground and the skele-
tal remains.


The wall panel accompanying the drawing of a Ti -
mucuan Indian explains some of the theories as to
why these bones of Florida's first inhabitants are in
that location.


Exhibits in the building are arranged in chronolo -
gical order, left to right, beginning with the Indian
cultures. First may be seen, in addition to the
burials, a brief history of Florida's Seminole In-
dians. Showcases contain typical clothing, dolls,



N .








baskets, a ceremonial rattle made from a whole tor-
toise shell, and other artifacts.


Next in order the visitor may see objects which
were part of Spanish life in-colonial St. Augustine,
recovered from excavated sites. A Spanish stirrup,
various types of hardware, and a large olive jar are
some examples.


Of particular interest to many is the Spanish coin
and gold collection recovered from early 18 c. ship-
wrecks along the Florida coast. The silver coins
were minted in the "New World" for shipment to Spain
and were called "reales". The gold pieces, which
were struck from gold bars, were called escudoss"
and "doblons". Both are in various denominations.
A curious item is a beautiful gold chain, in perfect
condition, which was found at the bottom of the sea
and which is still partly embedded in a piece of coral
just as it was discovered. The "sea diver's view",
with multi- level peep holes, allows the visitor, a
glimpse of the ocean's floor with other items which
were found there, just as the diver encountered them:
ingots, china cups, coins, chains, cannon balls, and
assorted hardware pieces can be identified.


In the center of the room a scale model of the
north section of the colonial city is a visual aid to
explain the extent of the program of restoring and
recreating America's birthplace, and gives a minia-.
ture view of how the 18th century city will appear
when complete.





.4










A tall showcase contains gifts presented to the
City of St. Augustine by Spanish governmental agen -
cies and cities, such as a replica of the 16th century
Spanish sword used by the city's founder, Pedro Men-
endez de Aviles, as well as bagpipes, medals, pho -
tographs, and other mementoes.



Additionalarticles of historic significance shown
in this building are an 18th century carved colonial
chest: memorabilia of St. Augustine's Flagler or
"Golden" Era, and a review of modern industry in
the city. The triangular kiosk illustrates the dif-
ferent aspects of the Historic-St. Augustine Preser -
vation Board's activities on its exterior panels, and
encloses a display of representative samples of hand -
crafts produced in its shops.



Owned and operated by:


HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


4.71


I

--



._;I i'


:`
'5 i'
'
~;;.;
-r~-.- .

It~


i:-
-


~----- '' '~~'-






* '...

*!' -*

"V-'
- -


Historic.

%t.

cAugustinfQ


'. n 's ,... .- i ..*, "


NffIEIITA&BIE

IIcDTUJSIE


UIU


'' '
'
,i
, -;~Snr~









This is a reconstruction of a late Spanish colonial-
style house built in the early nineteenth century,
Later a building stood on this site known as the City
Hotel, owned bySeth M. Wakeman, a merchant from
Connecticut who also operated a grocery store in it.


Vrhen the twentieth century hotel structure was
being razed for reconstruction of the house, human
skeletons believed to be of Timucuan Indians were
discovered scattered about under the property. How
they came to be buried there and by whom remains
an unsolved mystery. It is assumed that either they
died during an epidemic or mayhave been killed in a
skirmishwith the Spaniards. The bodies wereburied
without much preparation, as they were stacked on
top of each other in some instances. A small por -
tion of the floor has been left open to allow the visi-
tor to view a part of this burial ground and the skele-
tal remains.


The wall panel accompanying the drawing of a Ti -
mucuan Indian explains some of the theories as to
why these bones of Florida's first inhabitants are in
that location.


Exhibits in the building are arranged in chronolo -
gical order, left to right, beginning with the Indian
cultures. First may be seen, in addition to the
burials, a brief history of Florida's Seminole In-
dians. Showcases contain typical clothing, dolls,



N .








baskets, a ceremonial rattle made from a whole tor-
toise shell, and other artifacts.


Next in order the visitor may see objects which
were part of Spanish life in-colonial St. Augustine,
recovered from excavated sites. A Spanish stirrup,
various types of hardware, and a large olive jar are
some examples.


Of particular interest to many is the Spanish coin
and gold collection recovered from early 18 c. ship-
wrecks along the Florida coast. The silver coins
were minted in the "New World" for shipment to Spain
and were called "reales". The gold pieces, which
were struck from gold bars, were called escudoss"
and "doblons". Both are in various denominations.
A curious item is a beautiful gold chain, in perfect
condition, which was found at the bottom of the sea
and which is still partly embedded in a piece of coral
just as it was discovered. The "sea diver's view",
with multi- level peep holes, allows the visitor, a
glimpse of the ocean's floor with other items which
were found there, just as the diver encountered them:
ingots, china cups, coins, chains, cannon balls, and
assorted hardware pieces can be identified.


In the center of the room a scale model of the
north section of the colonial city is a visual aid to
explain the extent of the program of restoring and
recreating America's birthplace, and gives a minia-.
ture view of how the 18th century city will appear
when complete.





.4










A tall showcase contains gifts presented to the
City of St. Augustine by Spanish governmental agen -
cies and cities, such as a replica of the 16th century
Spanish sword used by the city's founder, Pedro Men-
endez de Aviles, as well as bagpipes, medals, pho -
tographs, and other mementoes.



Additionalarticles of historic significance shown
in this building are an 18th century carved colonial
chest: memorabilia of St. Augustine's Flagler or
"Golden" Era, and a review of modern industry in
the city. The triangular kiosk illustrates the dif-
ferent aspects of the Historic-St. Augustine Preser -
vation Board's activities on its exterior panels, and
encloses a display of representative samples of hand -
crafts produced in its shops.



Owned and operated by:


HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


4.71


I

--



._;I i'


:`
'5 i'
'
~;;.;
-r~-.- .

It~


i:-
-


~----- '' '~~'-






* '...

*!' -*

"V-'
- -


Historic.

%t.

cAugustinfQ


'. n 's ,... .- i ..*, "


NffIEIITA&BIE

IIcDTUJSIE


UIU


'' '
'
,i
, -;~Snr~









This is a reconstruction of a late Spanish colonial-
style house built in the early nineteenth century,
Later a building stood on this site known as the City
Hotel, owned bySeth M. Wakeman, a merchant from
Connecticut who also operated a grocery store in it.


Vrhen the twentieth century hotel structure was
being razed for reconstruction of the house, human
skeletons believed to be of Timucuan Indians were
discovered scattered about under the property. How
they came to be buried there and by whom remains
an unsolved mystery. It is assumed that either they
died during an epidemic or mayhave been killed in a
skirmishwith the Spaniards. The bodies wereburied
without much preparation, as they were stacked on
top of each other in some instances. A small por -
tion of the floor has been left open to allow the visi-
tor to view a part of this burial ground and the skele-
tal remains.


The wall panel accompanying the drawing of a Ti -
mucuan Indian explains some of the theories as to
why these bones of Florida's first inhabitants are in
that location.


Exhibits in the building are arranged in chronolo -
gical order, left to right, beginning with the Indian
cultures. First may be seen, in addition to the
burials, a brief history of Florida's Seminole In-
dians. Showcases contain typical clothing, dolls,



N .








baskets, a ceremonial rattle made from a whole tor-
toise shell, and other artifacts.


Next in order the visitor may see objects which
were part of Spanish life in-colonial St. Augustine,
recovered from excavated sites. A Spanish stirrup,
various types of hardware, and a large olive jar are
some examples.


Of particular interest to many is the Spanish coin
and gold collection recovered from early 18 c. ship-
wrecks along the Florida coast. The silver coins
were minted in the "New World" for shipment to Spain
and were called "reales". The gold pieces, which
were struck from gold bars, were called escudoss"
and "doblons". Both are in various denominations.
A curious item is a beautiful gold chain, in perfect
condition, which was found at the bottom of the sea
and which is still partly embedded in a piece of coral
just as it was discovered. The "sea diver's view",
with multi- level peep holes, allows the visitor, a
glimpse of the ocean's floor with other items which
were found there, just as the diver encountered them:
ingots, china cups, coins, chains, cannon balls, and
assorted hardware pieces can be identified.


In the center of the room a scale model of the
north section of the colonial city is a visual aid to
explain the extent of the program of restoring and
recreating America's birthplace, and gives a minia-.
ture view of how the 18th century city will appear
when complete.





.4










A tall showcase contains gifts presented to the
City of St. Augustine by Spanish governmental agen -
cies and cities, such as a replica of the 16th century
Spanish sword used by the city's founder, Pedro Men-
endez de Aviles, as well as bagpipes, medals, pho -
tographs, and other mementoes.



Additionalarticles of historic significance shown
in this building are an 18th century carved colonial
chest: memorabilia of St. Augustine's Flagler or
"Golden" Era, and a review of modern industry in
the city. The triangular kiosk illustrates the dif-
ferent aspects of the Historic-St. Augustine Preser -
vation Board's activities on its exterior panels, and
encloses a display of representative samples of hand -
crafts produced in its shops.



Owned and operated by:


HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


4.71


I

--



._;I i'


:`
'5 i'
'
~;;.;
-r~-.- .

It~


i:-
-


~----- '' '~~'-




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