The Arrivas House, Historic St. Augustine

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Material Information

Title:
The Arrivas House, Historic St. Augustine
Series Title:
St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Publisher:
Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board
Physical Location:
Box: 1SW6
Divider: [St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Saint Augustine (Fla.)
46 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Arrivas House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 46 Saint George Street
Coordinates:
29.896092 x -81.313202

Notes

General Note:
4.71
General Note:
This items was intended as a handout for visitors to interpret an individual property. The text in this pamphlet is a reproduction of information from the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board's "Guide Book" published in 1971.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
B12-L21
System ID:
USACH00001:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

ARRIVAcP
/- IOU C-


+4iStorie
(ut.
cAugustine,







This house is a restored..'tructure that has been
entitled the "Don Raimundo de Arrivas House", from
the name of an early owner. Itis significant because
its presentarchitecture includes aspects of the sev-
eral different historical and cultural periods of St.
Augustine life. Both the 18th and 19th centuries are
represented in the total architectural form of this
structure; Spanish, English and American character-
istics from those two centuries are apparent through-
out the restored building. The house also demon-
strates the basic local construction methods of the
past, thus presenting a plural cultural image.

The sequence of the development of the A rrivas
House has been lost in antiquity. Archaeological
work brought to light the fact that the first structure
on the site now occupied by the presentA rrivas House
goes back to the 1650-80 period. The first discern-
iblehouse was made of"ripio", a shell-concrete wall
construction. Additional rooms were later added to
the initial building, which ultimately was superseded
about 1725 by a coquina structure on the same lines
as the ripio house. A Spanish map of 1764 indicated
Don Raimundo de Arrivas owned the current site of
the restored structure; it lists two stone houses on
the lot, while a 1788 map designated ownership by
the Arrivas heirs and reveals one large L-shaped
masonry house. The wooden second story, with bal-
conies, was probably added about 1788, and greatly
rebuilt ca. 1829-30.

When Florida became a colony of Great Britain in
1763 the property was placedin the charge of a Bri-
tish agent, Jesse Fish, and later reverted to theAr-
rivasheirs when Florida was regained second time
by Spain. From 1824 until 1960 ownership changed
approximately 23 times.







The patios of Spanish houses such asthis wer
always to the south, for protection from the srth
wind and to take advantage of the sun. Patios were
used as another "room" by-the housewife in earlySt.
Augustine; here the women prepared food for cook-
ing, made soap, washed and performed other chores.
Lawns were non-existent and the ground was swept.

In the garden to the r-ar is a typical grape arbor
as well as fruit and pecan trees. Also a feature of
early Spanish times is the vegetable and herb garden.
The well is an original, and was in actual use until
recently. The citrus trees are of the sour orange
variety; sour oranges were valued by the Soaniards
for use in a variety of ways in cooking and preserving.

.t present the rooms on the first floor of the house
serve as an exposition of domestic life in a Spanish
colonial garrison town. A costumed hostess daily
demonstrates spinning, weaving, and candle-making
of a by gone era. The southeast room contains an
antique loom dated 1797 and a replica made in the
Restoration carpenter shop from colonial drawings.
Spinning is demonstrated on both wool and flax wheels.
This roomalso contains an 18th century wooden chest
and a painting over the fireplace of an unknown Spanish
nobleman.

Inthe southwest room, with its original fireplace,
are an antique table and benches purchased in Spain
plus a confessional- style cupboard for dishee.and
kitchen utensils two hundred years old. Here the
visitor can also see candles being dipped.

The small bedroomhas an antique Spianish painted
woodenbed, table, chestZ andanarm chair with foot-
stool to keep occupants' feet off the cold floor. Thb








small chair is from Guatemala. The prayer chair
before a crucifix on the wallis a replica made in the
carpenter shop.

The second floor, originally for bedrooms and
sewing room, is now utilized as the administrative
offices and board room of the Historic St. Augustine
Preservation Board.



Owned and operated by:



HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


















4.71



.'.. .... :. ...- ,.. :. : .. : .





ARRIVAcP
/- IOU C-


+4iStorie
(ut.
cAugustine,







This house is a restored..'tructure that has been
entitled the "Don Raimundo de Arrivas House", from
the name of an early owner. Itis significant because
its presentarchitecture includes aspects of the sev-
eral different historical and cultural periods of St.
Augustine life. Both the 18th and 19th centuries are
represented in the total architectural form of this
structure; Spanish, English and American character-
istics from those two centuries are apparent through-
out the restored building. The house also demon-
strates the basic local construction methods of the
past, thus presenting a plural cultural image.

The sequence of the development of the A rrivas
House has been lost in antiquity. Archaeological
work brought to light the fact that the first structure
on the site now occupied by the presentA rrivas House
goes back to the 1650-80 period. The first discern-
iblehouse was made of"ripio", a shell-concrete wall
construction. Additional rooms were later added to
the initial building, which ultimately was superseded
about 1725 by a coquina structure on the same lines
as the ripio house. A Spanish map of 1764 indicated
Don Raimundo de Arrivas owned the current site of
the restored structure; it lists two stone houses on
the lot, while a 1788 map designated ownership by
the Arrivas heirs and reveals one large L-shaped
masonry house. The wooden second story, with bal-
conies, was probably added about 1788, and greatly
rebuilt ca. 1829-30.

When Florida became a colony of Great Britain in
1763 the property was placedin the charge of a Bri-
tish agent, Jesse Fish, and later reverted to theAr-
rivasheirs when Florida was regained second time
by Spain. From 1824 until 1960 ownership changed
approximately 23 times.







The patios of Spanish houses such asthis wer
always to the south, for protection from the srth
wind and to take advantage of the sun. Patios were
used as another "room" by-the housewife in earlySt.
Augustine; here the women prepared food for cook-
ing, made soap, washed and performed other chores.
Lawns were non-existent and the ground was swept.

In the garden to the r-ar is a typical grape arbor
as well as fruit and pecan trees. Also a feature of
early Spanish times is the vegetable and herb garden.
The well is an original, and was in actual use until
recently. The citrus trees are of the sour orange
variety; sour oranges were valued by the Soaniards
for use in a variety of ways in cooking and preserving.

.t present the rooms on the first floor of the house
serve as an exposition of domestic life in a Spanish
colonial garrison town. A costumed hostess daily
demonstrates spinning, weaving, and candle-making
of a by gone era. The southeast room contains an
antique loom dated 1797 and a replica made in the
Restoration carpenter shop from colonial drawings.
Spinning is demonstrated on both wool and flax wheels.
This roomalso contains an 18th century wooden chest
and a painting over the fireplace of an unknown Spanish
nobleman.

Inthe southwest room, with its original fireplace,
are an antique table and benches purchased in Spain
plus a confessional- style cupboard for dishee.and
kitchen utensils two hundred years old. Here the
visitor can also see candles being dipped.

The small bedroomhas an antique Spianish painted
woodenbed, table, chestZ andanarm chair with foot-
stool to keep occupants' feet off the cold floor. Thb








small chair is from Guatemala. The prayer chair
before a crucifix on the wallis a replica made in the
carpenter shop.

The second floor, originally for bedrooms and
sewing room, is now utilized as the administrative
offices and board room of the Historic St. Augustine
Preservation Board.



Owned and operated by:



HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE
PRESERVATION BOARD
Division of Cultural Affairs
Department of State
Florida


















4.71



.'.. .... :. ...- ,.. :. : .. : .




Full Text






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before ri fi. on the eliac d
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PRSEVAIO BAR
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Division of Cultural Affairs
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ntitled the 13Do a RamAode Arriskaouse~ ,.fo
'The taine oa~ anarly owner. It-is signiflcntbeeauser its present architecture inl1udeat.aspects o hsv erl diffeen h.itrcal&an cuturlproaot
Augustine Mol. Bthl tha
represent in .thee total a rchitectural form of~hi stru cture; p~ani sh, nglish.!ae Arner.icacarater: isticw~s frmthose two centies ateaprethouh
I".<.
out th.e..e stor edlbrillding. ~The hse als demon
strates the..basi oca construsctionifmethods oith pasat, thspresentin~g a 1L ral #cutural image.
IT h u pxtu


The sequence of the development of the Arrivas House hs bn lost in antiquity. r caeoogcal<

onI the site now occuied bh resent Arvo ges back to the 1650-809period. Thfirst dicen ilhouse wa maof"io, a shell-concree wall construction. Additional rosoms werea later*dedt the intil buildng, whcutiaeywas supersde ab by coquina struture t e ie



o hile 17-8t8 mp de signte4 wn p b
ta ivas heirs and revea oe
maonry house. The wooden seodsoy wit :al
coieas, wasgprobably added about 1788, and greatl
"C7

eb uilt ca.W. 829- 30
o t ceA -6.j,





WhenFoida became &acolony ofGetBiaini
,W-o~~7$ 4j'.177-Z7F
iv ida was r ea secn


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by Sp;~~,::ia ~ ii~ From824 nti 1960~ ownershipchange
approxiately 2 times











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e az~.ntaue ablean& endCEI sw4I;48
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