San Agustin Antíguo Museum Interpretive Map

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Material Information

Title:
San Agustin Antíguo Museum Interpretive Map
Series Title:
St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Physical Location:
Box: 1SW6
Divider: [St. Augustine Restoration, Inc. Interpretive Material]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Saint Augustine (Fla.)
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine

Notes

General Note:
INT-3-84
General Note:
This trifold brochure was provided as a map and to give interpretive information on the houses in the San Agustin Antiguo Complex along St. George Street

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
B7
System ID:
USACH00001:00001


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[1] Ribera
You are at the reconstructed Ribera
House, the Orientation Center of our
outdoor museum. Gardens and grape arbors
enhance the grounds of this two-story 18th-
century home, and a furnished period room
upstairs reproduces the domestic atmosphere
of a wealthy St. Augustine household. Go
out the garden gate and cross St. George
Street to begin your tour at the Gallegos
House (2).


San Agustin Antiguo Museum

Welcome to San Agustin Antiguo (Old St. Augustine), an out-
door museum operated by the Stale of Florida for visitors to the
restoration area in the nation's oldest city. Enjoy a self-guided
stroll behind the garden walls of busy St. George Street, where
interpreters in period dress recreate the daily life of SI. Augustine
in the mid-1700's. Most of the buildings are reconstructions on
original foundations. Other stops on your tour include 18th-
century craft demonstrations and a 19th-century house museum.


Additional Information on Back














The Barrio
18th-Century Spanish Neighborhood
By the end of the First Spanish Perio,
(1565-1763), St. Augustine was a frontier garrison
town that increasingly benefited from outside
trade.
Spanish soldiers from the nearby Castillode
San Marcos lived in houses like these clustered in
barrios or neighborhoods. Their wives were
usually Indian or mestiza (mixed blood) women,
Their neighbors might be shopkeepers, priestsi
tavernkeepers, ranchers, fishermen, sailors, log-
gers or artisans. Trade with the Indian nations and
the English colonies improved the economy.
Population was on the rise. The Spaniards'
departure, making way for England's takeover iri
1763, stalled the development of the Florida
colony.

[21 Gallegos House
Pause for a moment to share the atmosphere
of an average St. Augustine household with thq
wife of a Spanish soldier. Ask her what is grow
ing in her garden or simmering in her pot. Her
domestic chores reflect the skills of generations of
Southeastern Indians. Such was the everyday life
of 18th-century St. Augustine, a unique blend of
European and native cultures.

131 G6mez House
A spreading live oak shades the yard of thq
G6mez House, though in Spanish times the spac
would have contained only fruit trees. Most
houses on the Florida frontier, whether wood or
masonry, were small, crude, and constructed
almost completely from local materials. The few\
plain furnishings were usually homemade. I


. '.. .


1[4]1Blacksmith Shop
Blacksmithing was a craft that the Spanish
had raised to a high art. Smiths in St. Augustine,
isolated from the necessary raw materials,
confined their work to simple architectural
hardware and tools. Like his 18th-century
predecessor, our blacksmith has built his own shop
out of tabby, a type of concrete made from oyster
shells and lime.

[5] Gonzalez House
The original Gonzilez House was built of co-
quina, a native shellstone quarried on Anastasia
Island. Inside we have a store of the 1740's and
50's. Spanish privateers and English merchants
holding official contracts delivered a wide variety
of goods to these neighborhood stores.
Our storekeepers are skilled in many handcrafts,
especially in the making of traditional San
Marcos pottery. Ask about this unique ceramic
ware.


16] De Hita House
The de Hita House exhibits typical features of
Spanish Florida architecture, including the side
entrance, an east window open toward the summer
sea breezes, and a loggia or porch on the south to
take advantage of the winter sun. School groups
visit the de Hita House for special hands-on
learning activities.
From here we invite you to leave our barrio
through the passageway south of the blacksmith
shop. You will emerge into another era of St.
Augustine's history.

171 De Burgo-Pellicer House
18th-Century Crafts
Architecturally, the De Burgo-Pellicer House
reflects English designs imported to the city during
the British Period (1763-1783), including chim-
neys, street entrances and glass windows.
Cabinetmaking, spinning, weaving and
candledipping are demonstrated here. These
crafts, rarely if ever practiced in St. Augustine,
provide our museum with detailed reproductions
of furniture, fabrics and clothing.

[81DeMesa-S-nchezHouse 1830'sHouseMuseum
Guided Tours Every Hour and Half-Hour
Your visit to San Agustin Antiguo ends at the
de Mesa-Sanchez House, an original colonial
building restored to its appearance in the 1830's.
Antique furnishings reflect the lifestyle of a
well-to-do family in St. Augustine during the
American Territorial Period (1821-1845). A slide
show and exhibits offer insights into the challenges
of historic house restoration and relate the
fascinating history of the house to the early history
of St. Augustine.


INT-3-84




Full Text




San Agustin Antiguo Museum

Welcome to San Agustin Antiguo (Old St. Augustine), an outdoor museum operated by the State of Florida for visitors to the restoration area in the nation's oldest city. Enjoy a self-guided stroll behind the garden walls of busy St. George Street, where interpreters in period dress recreate the daily life of St. Augustine [3 in the mid-1700's. Most of the buildings are reconstructions on [1] Ribera original foundations. Other stops on your tour include 18thYou are at the reconstructed Ribera century craft demonstrations and a 19th-century house museum. House, the Orientation Center of our -- -outdoor museum. Gardens and grape arbors enhance the grounds of this two-story 18thcentury home, and a furnished period room Special Information upstairs reproduces the domestic atmosphere We urge you to walk carefully floors, of a wealthy St. Augustine household. Go paths and grounds are as unevn and rugh out the garden gate and cross St. George as those of the 18th century. Special Street to begin your tour at the Gallegos arrangements for physically limited visitors House (2). scan be madeat the Ribera House Orientation ........... ..... 141 Center.
a Smoking, eating and drinking are not permitted inside the buildings.
The de Mesa-Sinchez House (8), the last stop on your tour, is open on a scheduled basis, with guided tours every hour and A half-hour.











For Future Development



Additional Information on Back













The Barrio [6 De Hita House
18th-Century Spanish Neighborhood The de Hita House exhibits typical features of
By the end of the First Spanish Period Spanish Florida architecture, including the side (1565-1763), St. Augustine was a frontier garrison entrance, an east window open toward the summer town that increasingly benefited from outside sea breezes, and a loggia or porch on the south to trade. take advantage of the winter sun. School groups
Spanish soldiers from the nearby Castillo de visit the de Hita House for special hands-on San Marcos lived in houses like these clustered in learning activities. barrios or neighborhoods. Their wives were From here we invite you to leave our barrio usually Indian or mestiza (mixed blood) women. through the passageway south of the blacksmith Their neighbors might be shopkeepers, priests, shop. You will emerge into another era of St. tavernkeepers, ranchers, fishermen, sailors, log- Augustine's history. gers or artisans. Trade with the Indian nations and 1 D.
the English colonies improved the economy. [7 De Burgo-Pelllcer House Population was on the rise. The Spaniards' 18th-ntury Crafts departure, making way for England's takeover iri Architecturally, the De Burgo-Pellicer House 1763, stalled the development of the Florida [41 Blacksmith Shop reflects English designs imported to the city during colony. Blacksmithing was a craft that the Spanish the British Period (1763-1783), including chimhad raised to a high art. Smiths in St. Augustine, neys, street entrances and glass windows. [2] Gallegos House isolated from the necessary raw materials, Cabinetmaking, spinning, weaving and
Pause for a moment to share the atmosphere confined their work to simple architectural candledipping are demonstrated here. These of an average St. Augustine household with the hardware and tools. Like his 18th-century crafts, rarely if ever practiced in St. Augustine, wife of a Spanish soldier. Ask her what is grow. predecessor, our blacksmith has built his own shop provide our museum with detailed reproductions ing in her garden or simmering in her pot. Her out of tabby, a type of concrete made from oyster of furniture, fabrics and clothing. domestic chores reflect the skills of generations of shells and lime. [8]DeMesa-SinhezHose 1830'sHouseMuseum Southeastern Indians. Such was the everyday life Guded Tousi EveS Hour and Half-Hour of 18th-century St. Augustine, a unique blend of [5 Gonzlez House Guided Tours Every Hour and Half-Hour European and native cultures. The original onzlez ousevisit to San Agustin Antiguo ends at the The oriinalGonzleHue ide Mesa-Snchez House, an original colonial [31 Gomez House quina, a native shellstone quarried on Anastasia building restored to its appearance in the 1830's.
Island. Inside we have a store of the 1740's and Atiqus e e spreading live oak shades the yard of thand English merchants Antique furnishings reflect the lifestyle of a G6mez House, though in Spanish times the space t well-to-do family in St. Augustine during the would have contained only fruit trees. Most holding official contractsdelivered a wide variety American Territorial Period (1821-1845). A slide houses on the Florida frontier, whether wood or of goods to these neighborhood stores. show and exhibits offer insights into the challenges masonry, were small, crude, and constructed Our storekeepers are skilled in many handcrafts, of historic house restoration and relate the almost completely from local materials. The few especially in the making of traditional San fascinating history of the house to the early history plain furnishings were usually homemade. Marcos pottery. Ask about this uniqueceramic of St. Augustine.
ware.
INT-3-84