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Politics are a Beach

University of Florida Institutional Repository
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Material Information

Title:
Politics are a Beach
Physical Description:
Learning Object
Creator:
Davis, Helen

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
political cartoons, analyzing primary sources
Genre:
learning object   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
In this lesson, participants will utilize the observe/reflect/question strategy to analyze a political cartoon. Further research will be conducted to answer participant driven questions.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
UFTRC00023:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Politics are a Beach
Physical Description:
Learning Object
Creator:
Davis, Helen

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
political cartoons, analyzing primary sources
Genre:
learning object   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Abstract:
In this lesson, participants will utilize the observe/reflect/question strategy to analyze a political cartoon. Further research will be conducted to answer participant driven questions.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID:
UFTRC00023:00001


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*denotes a required field Summary Lesson Title (create a title for your lesson ) : Politics are a Beach: Tools for Evaluating Primary Sources Lesson Summary (1 3 sentence summary): Students apply a strategy to analyze a political cartoon. After consulting additional resources, students write a news report informing readers about the context of the political cartoon. *Subject (e.g. Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies/Hist ory, Art, Music, etc.) : Social Studies Intended Audience/Grade Level: 8 th grade Time Frame (designate whether this lesson will compose a series of lessons or a single lesson and approximate time frame) : Two 80 minute class periods Standards and Purpose Standards (link appropriate Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, or other standards below ) : SS.8.A.1.2: use research and inquiry skills to analyze American History using primary and secondary sources. CCSS.ELA L iteracy.W.8.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. UFDC Resources (Identify and permalink for documents utilized from the UFDC here) : http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083441/00101 Other resources: Copies of articles and handouts Guiding Question (s) ( What are the guiding questions for this lesson? Guiding questions are broad questions that students and the teacher can come back to throughout the learning experience. A good guiding question is (a) thought provoking, counterintuitive, and/or controversial, (b) requires students to draw upon content knowledge and personal experie nce, and (c) can be revisited throughout the lesson to engage students in an evolving discussion. ) : How do political cartoons reveal diverse perspectives? Objectives ( What should students know and be able to do as a result of this lesson? What are the learning objectives for this lesson? What will students know and be able to do as a result of this lesson? Try to make the objectives measurable and specific. ) : The students will analyze a political cartoon by observing, reflecting, and quest ioning. The students will read and analyze additional resources to answer self generated questions. The students will synthesize information from three sources into a

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*denotes a required field written news report informing the readers of the context of the political cartoon. Asse ssment (how will data be collected on student performance?) Formative ( Describe how and when the students will get feedback about their performance or understanding during the lesson. How and when will they have an opportunity to use this feedback to imp rove their performance? ) : Students will receive feedback after each phase of analyzing primary sources by sharing their responses with a peer. After hearing additional peer responses, students can add to their original notes. Students will receive teacher feedback after analyzing additional resources. The teacher will determine if applicable or assigned questions have been addressed sufficiently. If they have not, the teacher will provide question stems or question ideas to help students gather pe rtinent evidence. Summative ( Describe how the teacher will determine if the students have reached the learning targets for this lesson. How will the teacher measure the impact of this lesson on student learning? ) : Students will be assessed through the i nformative writing piece at the culmination of the lesson. Evaluation rubric will be provided. Teaching Phase (step by step narrative guide to instruction) Activate/Build Prior knowledge ( Describe how the teacher will gather information about student understanding and prior knowledge before the lesson or at the beginning of the lesson. How and when can the teacher use this information during the lesson? ) : or background knowledge and/or content knowledge. Questions and guesses are permitted; responses are generally not scored by the teacher, but if t ideas to paper. Students should have approximately 3 5 minutes to write their response. After 3 5 minutes is up, students share their responses with a peer and then teacher solicits ideas fro m the whole class before moving on to direct instruction. Direct Instruction ( How will the teacher present the concept or skill to students? ) : The teacher will tell students that they will learn a strategy to analyze political cartoons in order to learn write down any observations they notice. Teacher will model and think aloud the first observation by the political car toon carrying towels and books. What do you

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*denotes a required field Some other questions to consider when writing down observations: what does the resource say? Where do your eyes go first? What powerful words and ideas are ex pressed? What do you notice about the page the object is printed on? What other details do you see? Students should write responses down in the first column of the three column graphic organizer and then share their responses with a peer. If students h ear any observations from a peer they did not notate, they may write them under the observe column. Next the student and teacher should move to the reflect column. The teacher should model and think aloud reflections regarding the cartoon by stating som can begin to conclude that the author of the political cartoon is not happy about should begin to write down their reflections in the second column of the three column graphic organizer. Some additional questions to consider: what do you think was happening when this was written? Why do you think this political cartoon was created? What can you l earn from examining this? If someone created something like this today, how would it be different? How would it be the same? Students should share their reflections with a peer when done writing them down and add any notable reflections to their chart. Last, the students will move to the questioning phase. At this phase, the teacher models and thinks aloud any remaining questions about the political cartoon. A model teacher question is: Who are the two figures in the political cartoon? Students shoul d write questions about what they would like to know more about and what is still unanswered in the political cartoon. If students struggle developing their own questions, they should consider the question stems: who, what, when, where, why, and how. S tudents should share questions with each other and add to their lists. Each student should have at least three questions remaining about the political cartoon. This is a formative teacher checkpoint. If students do not have three questions, the teacher should prompt them to include more. Guided Practice ( What activity or exercise will the students complete with teacher guidance? ) : During the next phase, the students will consult different sources that inform about some aspect of the political cart oon. Sources can be leveled according to text complexity and reading levels of students. High level readers: Ross Barnett Obituary http://www.nytimes.com/1987/11/07/obituaries/ross barnett segregationist dies governor of mississippi in 1960 s.html Medium level readers: St. Petersburg Sun Newspaper article about the Convention http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19630728&id=ChUmAAAAIBAJ&sjid=d1IDAAAAIBAJ &pg=3412,4025493 Low level readers: Encyclopedia article on George Wallace http://archive.school.eb.com/all/comptons/article 9314059?query=governor%20wallace&ct=null http://photos.denverpost.com/2013/06/11/photos 50 years since desegregation at the university of alabama/#28 The procedure is as follow: assign different individuals different articles. As students read through thei r assigned reading, ask them to underline any lines, quotes, words, or phrases from the article that answers their questions from the previous phase or addresses questions that deal with who, what,

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*denotes a required field when, where, why, and how. After students read their arti cle and underline key information, require them to transfer any facts from the article that addresses their questions or the who, what, when, students have recorded at least FIVE facts from the article, ask students to get out of their seats and find an individual with a different article (it may help to print the articles and resources onto different colors of paper to make it easier to see which students h ave read different articles). When students find another student with a different article, they tell each other the article they read and exchange one fact from each article. Each student writes down their new fact, thanks the other, and finds a new part ner with a different article. The process repeats itself until each student has at least one fact from each resource. Students may continue to get information from other students until time is up. Independent Practice ( What activities or exercises will the students complete to reinforce the concepts and skills developed in the lesson?): Now that students have learned more about the historical context of the political cartoon, they will synthesize their learning into a w riting activity. Using the RAFT (role, audience, format, and topic) pre writing strategy, students will assume the role of a news report addressing the citizens of Miami. The student will write a news report informing the citizen s of Miami what the confer ence is about, when the conference took place, where the conference took place, who the governors are, and why their attendance might be controversial. If students struggle writing a news report, show a brief clip of a new report and ask students to notice certain traits of the news report (i.e. timing, word choice, and subject matter). Once students have written their news reports, invite students to share their news reports with each other reading with fluency and expression. Closure ( How will the learning from the lesson be reinforced over time?) : Use as part of a larger Civil Rights movement exercise. Continue to analyze political cartoons. Reading strategies (describe strategies in detail): Observe/Reflect/Question Writing strategies (describe strategies in detail): Quick Write RAFT Speaking and listening strategies (describe strategies in detail: Give One/Get One Accommodations ( Describe how to accommodate students with special needs and how to differentiate instruction. ) Leveled reading tasks Peer assistance Graphic organizers Extensions ( Describe possible extensions of this lesson. )

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*denotes a required field Re Teaching: Repeat observe/reflect/question process on another political cartoon related to the same time period Enrichment: Assign a short research paper in which students research the issues addressed by the Materials Special materials/preparation needed ( Describe what special materials or preparations are needed for this lesson. ) : Printed ar ticles Printed graphic organizer Printed cartoon Suggested technology ( What are the suggested technology requirements to use this lesson? ) : Document camera PowerPoint Notes and Additional Recommendations ( Provide recommendations concerning the preparation o r implementation of your lesson) : Reflection (Questions to stimulate reflection on the process of teaching with primary sources for the implementing teacher not for completion by the lesson developer ) Teacher learning: How did my students respond? What would I do differently next time? What would I keep the same? How will I use primary sources in the future?

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*denotes a required field Attachments ( Attach or imbed worksheets and additional documents below) Give One/Get One Give One Get One Question Answer Question Answer

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