Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization on Respiration and Temperature Response of Tropical Seedlings

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization on Respiration and Temperature Response of Tropical Seedlings
Physical Description:
1 online resource (47 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Fahey, Catherine
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Botany, Biology
Committee Chair:
KITAJIMA,KAORU
Committee Co-Chair:
SCHUUR,EDWARD A
Committee Members:
MARTIN,TIMOTHY A
GRAHAM,JAMES H,JR

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
acclimation -- forest -- fungi -- mycorrhizae -- panama -- warming
Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Botany thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous in tropical forests and play a role in the forest carbon cycle because they increase nutrient acquisition and biomass of host plants, but also incur a carbon cost to the plant. AM roots of a temperate herbaceous plant species exhibit higher respiration rates than non-AM roots and have decreased capacity for long-term acclimation of respiration to cold temperatures, but a similar study has yet to be conducted for tropical or woody species. For improved prediction of tropical forest responses to a warmer climate, a better understanding of tropical mycorrhizal response to temperature is needed. Respiratory acclimation is predicted to result in lower respiration rate at increased temperature compared with no acclimation. Our objective was to determine how respiration rates of above- and belowground plant parts differ with AMF colonization in tropical seedlings, as well as whether acclimation of respiration to increased temperature varies with AM colonization. Seedlings of five tree species were grown in elevated or ambient nighttime temperature. We inoculated seedlings with AMF spores or sterile inoculum and measured whole plant and belowground respiration rates, as well as plant growth and biomass allocation. We found an increase in whole plant, root, and shoot respiration rate with AMF colonization, while temperature acclimation varied among species and was dependent on AMF colonization in some species. The influence of AMF colonization on growth and allocation also varied among plant species. Understanding the factors that influence respiratory acclimation can help predict changes in the carbon cycle and potential feedbacks with atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Catherine Fahey.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: KITAJIMA,KAORU.
Local:
Co-adviser: SCHUUR,EDWARD A.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-11-30

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046852:00001