A Multi-Level Evaluation of a Chagas Disease Intervention in a Mayan Village in Yucatan, Mexico

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Material Information

Title:
A Multi-Level Evaluation of a Chagas Disease Intervention in a Mayan Village in Yucatan, Mexico
Physical Description:
1 online resource (132 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Ball, Jacob D
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.A.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Anthropology
Committee Chair:
STEPP,JOHN RICHARD
Committee Co-Chair:
YOUNG,ALYSON GAIL
Committee Members:
PULLIAM,JULIET

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
anthropology -- chagas -- evaluation -- health -- intervention
Anthropology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Anthropology thesis, M.A.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Cultural, political and economic contexts of a particular community influence how individuals understand health and disease epidemiology, and thus the likelihood of participating in health interventions. This comparative study, using observation and semi-structured, in-depth interviews, evaluated an insect screen distribution-community education intervention to prevent house infestation by Triatoma dimidiata, a vector for Chagas disease. The interviews assessed knowledge, attitudes and practices related to Chagas epidemiology, T. dimidiata ecology, pest management, and were conducted in Teya and Suma de Hidalgo, two Yucatec Mayan villages with and without the insect screen intervention, respectively. Knowledge pertaining to Chagas epidemiology was significantly higher in Teya than in Suma. A very small percentage of respondents in Teya, and no one in Suma were able to identify the classic signs and symptoms of Chagas disease. Respondents in Teya have high levels of perceived risk and severity related to Chagas, and almost everyone recognizes the benefit of insect screens. Very few respondents in both villages were able to successfully identify nymph stages of T. dimidiata, which has implications for monitoring and surveillance. Household economics present a multi-level barrier to pest management, which stems from issues including gender norms, local health infrastructure, local politics, regional and national economics, and national health policy. These findings suggest that the intervention should be better integrated into existing health infrastructure at the local, state and national levels, and that new educational materials should be developed to address specific community knowledge gaps, and improve self-efficacy related to pest management and Chagas control.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob D Ball.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: STEPP,JOHN RICHARD.
Local:
Co-adviser: YOUNG,ALYSON GAIL.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046845:00001