Family Mealtime Functioning and Parental Feeding Concerns and Practices

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Material Information

Title:
Family Mealtime Functioning and Parental Feeding Concerns and Practices
Physical Description:
1 online resource (63 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Westen, Sarah C
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Psychology, Clinical and Health Psychology
Committee Chair:
JANICKE,DAVID
Committee Co-Chair:
WIENS,BRENDA A
Committee Members:
PRICE,CATHERINE ELIZABETH
PEREIRA,DEIDRE B

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
child -- family -- feeding -- mealtime -- obesity
Clinical and Health Psychology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Psychology thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The quality of family mealtime and parent-child interactions at mealtime may be one mechanism whereby the family environment influences child eating behavior. Shared family mealtimes have been associated with diverse child outcomes and are a central event which may bode for either favorable or suboptimal child development. However, little is known about how parental feeding attitudes and behaviors impact the quality of the mealtime environment. The overall purpose of this pilot study was to conduct live observation of family mealtime, and using a coding system of family mealtime interactions, determine whether mother and father self-report of feeding attitudes and behaviors predict overall family mealtime functioning. Further, the study examined whether discrepancies in mother and father report predict mealtime functioning. It was hypothesized that parental responsibility, concerns about child weight, parental control practices in child feeding, and parental discrepancy in feeding attitudes and behaviors are inversely related to family functioning at mealtime. Results indicated that greater maternal concern about child weight predicted poorer family mealtime functioning; however, parental concern did not. Further, neither maternal nor paternal perceived responsibility in child feeding or control practices in feeding predicted family mealtime functioning. However, greater parental discrepancy in restrictive feeding practices and pressure to eat predicted poorer family mealtime functioning in an exploratory model. Future research should aim to replicate these findings and study these variables longitudinally to help better understand the impact of parent feeding attitudes and behaviors on family mealtime interactions and subsequent associated child health outcomes.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Sarah C Westen.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: JANICKE,DAVID.
Local:
Co-adviser: WIENS,BRENDA A.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046796:00001