Using Cross-Sectional Properties to Investigate the Advent of Walking in a Sample of Central Californian Amerindian Children

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Material Information

Title:
Using Cross-Sectional Properties to Investigate the Advent of Walking in a Sample of Central Californian Amerindian Children
Physical Description:
1 online resource (9 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Le, Kim N
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.A.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Anthropology
Committee Chair:
DAEGLING,DAVID
Committee Co-Chair:
TILLMAN,MARK D
Committee Members:
COLLINGS,PETER F
WALL,CHRISTINE E

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
biomechanics -- bipedalism -- skeletal -- strain -- stress
Anthropology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Anthropology thesis, M.A.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This study investigated how the change in mechanical loading associated with the onset of walking affected the cross-sectional dimensions (CSDs), i.e., area moments and section moduli, of long bones in a sample of Central Californian Amerindian children. Four statistical methods (reduced major axis regressions, rigidity ratios, ANCOVA, and bootstrap estimates) analyzed how CSDs change with diaphyseal length and across age groups, 0 to 60 months (mos). CSDs and length grew the fastest during the first year, with CSDs of upper limb bones increasing faster relative to length than lower limb bones in order to be sufficiently rigid for lifting and carrying the body in crawling. The 9mos CSD growth peak in femur and tibia most likely reflects the redistribution of body weight to the lower limbs, making the estimated age range for the onset of walking to be 9-18mos. After the first year, CSD and length growth rates declined. Especially in the lower limb, length growth was of primary importance, always outpacing CSD growth to allow limbs to reach the appropriate proportions for bipedal stability. At 48-60mos, the lower limb bones experienced an increase in CSD growth, most likely to counteract the increasing bending strain as the bone lengthened. Despite its non-involvement in weight-bearing, the fibula also showed this pattern, perhaps signaling the increased use of muscles of plantarflexion and eversion as gait matured. Growth rate did not differ between AP and ML CSDs, supporting past studies showing that bone is not necessarily reinforced in the axis of maximum strain.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Kim N Le.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: DAEGLING,DAVID.
Local:
Co-adviser: TILLMAN,MARK D.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046793:00001