Relationships between Unfavorable Neighborhood Characteristics and Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Gynecological Cancer Patie...

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Material Information

Title:
Relationships between Unfavorable Neighborhood Characteristics and Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm in Gynecological Cancer Patients with Sleep Disturbance
Physical Description:
1 online resource (61 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Esparza-Duran, Diego
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Psychology, Clinical and Health Psychology
Committee Chair:
PEREIRA,DEIDRE B
Committee Co-Chair:
BOGGS,STEPHEN R
Committee Members:
PERLSTEIN,WILLIAM MICHAEL
MCCRAE,CHRISTINA SMITH

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
cancer -- cortisol -- neighborhoods -- stress -- women
Clinical and Health Psychology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Psychology thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Individuals in disadvantaged neighborhoods have elevated risk for morbidity/mortality. This relationship may be significant in cancer, which disproportionately affects disadvantaged groups. Dysregulated diurnal cortisol rhythm may be a stress-related biological mechanism by which this occurs. This study examined unfavorable neighborhood characteristics and dysregulated cortisol rhythm in women undergoing surgery for gynecologic cancer. Social well-being (SWB) was examined as an interpersonal level moderator of this relationship. Thirty-five women with PSQI confirmed poor sleep were assessed for unfavorable neighborhood characteristics via national databases and SWB via the FACT-G. ELISA was used to assess salivary cortisol levels four times per day for three days before their post-operative appointment. Linear regression analyses predicted cortisol slope with neighborhood characteristics and SWB controlling for cancer stage and family income. Women in neighborhoods with higher percentage of individuals receiving public assistance (%PA) had marginally significantly more normal cortisol slopes, Beta = -0.35, p = 0.06. Because of this unexpected relationship, a nonlinear relationship was explored. A significant quadratic effect emerged; women in neighborhoods with the lowest and highest %PA had the most abnormal cortisol slopes, Beta = 0.40, p = 0.03. SWB and cortisol were unrelated; SWB did not buffer the relationship between %PA and cortisol. Although the results were largely non-significant, findings suggest that stress-related biological pathways could be a potential link between unfavorable neighborhood characteristics and dysregulated stress response, but the relationship may not be linear. Biobehavioral oncology research should explore relationships among community level variables, cortisol, and tumorigenesis in more depth with larger samples.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Diego Esparza-Duran.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: PEREIRA,DEIDRE B.
Local:
Co-adviser: BOGGS,STEPHEN R.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046765:00001