The Use of First- and Second-Language Fillers by Second-Language Japanese Speakers

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Material Information

Title:
The Use of First- and Second-Language Fillers by Second-Language Japanese Speakers
Physical Description:
1 online resource (62 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Matthews, Marc A
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.A.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Linguistics
Committee Chair:
WAYLAND,RATREE
Committee Co-Chair:
WEHMEYER,ANN KATHRYN

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
discourse -- fillers -- fluency -- japanese -- sla
Linguistics -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Linguistics thesis, M.A.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Fillers, uh and um in English, are a spoken language phenomenon. Research has shown that fillers perform a variety of functions in discourse beyond simply stalling or holding the conversational floor: they signal hesitation and politeness, and soften face-threatening speech acts. Furthermore, the specific inventory and functions of fillers vary from language to language. Therefore, becoming a fluent second language (L2) speaker entails the acquisition and appropriate deployment of L2 fillers. There is a modest body of research into the development of L2 fillers and their effects on perceptions of L2 fluency. However, previous studies have ignored the use of first language (L1) fillers in L2 speech. This thesis reports on the findings of two investigations. The first is a qualitative analysis of the fillers used in an L2 Japanese oral interview test. L2 speakers tended to use Japanese fillers for organizational and discourse functions, whereas L1 (English) fillers were used mainly for linguistic planning and repair. In a follow-up survey, native Japanese listeners rated the fluency of the L2 learners. Overall filler use correlated negatively with fluency ratings. L1 fillers correlated with increased rate of pauses and decreased rate of speech, whereas L2 fillers did not correlate with any temporal fluency measures. Comments from survey participants suggest that inappropriate use of L2 fillers impacts fluency judgments, that listeners may not consciously recognize the use of L1 fillers or the appropriate use of L2 fillers, but that these factors may still play a part in their perceptions of fluency.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Marc A Matthews.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: WAYLAND,RATREE.
Local:
Co-adviser: WEHMEYER,ANN KATHRYN.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046739:00001