Thoracic Muscle Respiratory Load Compensation in Conscious Animals and Human Respiratory Perception after Spinal Cord Injury

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Thoracic Muscle Respiratory Load Compensation in Conscious Animals and Human Respiratory Perception after Spinal Cord Injury
Physical Description:
1 online resource (184 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Jaiswal, Poonam B
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Veterinary Medical Sciences, Veterinary Medicine
Committee Chair:
DAVENPORT,PAUL W
Committee Co-Chair:
REEP,ROGER L
Committee Members:
BOLSER,DONALD CLEMENTZ
HAYWARD,LINDA F
FULLER,DAVID
MARTIN,ANATOLE D,III

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
cervical -- conscious -- cord -- external -- injury -- intercostal -- loading -- rat -- respiratory -- spinal
Veterinary Medicine -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Veterinary Medical Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The external intercostal (EI) muscles are primary muscles of inspiration and play a significant role during normal and loaded breathing. Intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO) is a conscious animal model used to induce respiratory load compensation, which is a muscle mediated response aimed at restoring ventilatory homeostasis. Respiratory muscle activity is modulated by the conscious state. This doctoral dissertation presents results from three studies aimed to assess the neurophysiology of the EI muscle in a conscious rat model. Accordingly, the first aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological activity pattern of the EI muscle in adult conscious rats. Our primary finding was that ITTO elicits a load compensation response in the EI muscles that is characterized by an increase in EMG activity. The control of thoracic motorneurons is via direct input from the contralateral VRG and polysynaptic ipsilateral pathways from the DRG and VRG via cervical and thoracic interneurons. Cervical spinal cord injury (c-SCI) disrupts these descending inputs to the respiratory motorneurons. This in turn affects the normal EI muscle functioning and may alter their respiratory load compensation response. In our second aim, we studied respiratory load compensation in the EI muscles by means of ITTO conditioning in conscious rats with unilateral c-SCI using a cervical hemisection (C2HS) model. The results of this study indicate that although bilateral EI muscle activity is reduced one week after c-SCI, ITTO elicits a load compensation response in these muscles and repeated conditioning may improve EI muscle functioning. The purpose of our third aim was to assess the impact of ITTO conditioning on EI muscle neurophysiology. We exposed ITTO conditioned, chronically injured c-SCI animals to hyperoxic-hypercapnia and analyzed the corresponding EI muscle EMG activity. Repeated acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) exposure is known to improve the ventilatory status in SCI animals. In our final aim, we evaluated respiratory load compensation and magnitude estimation abilities of inspiratory resistive loads (IRL) in an individual with chronic c-SCI before and ten days after AIH treatment. AIH did not alter the perceptual sensitivity and induced increases in ventilatory load compensation ability in our study subject.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Poonam B Jaiswal.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: DAVENPORT,PAUL W.
Local:
Co-adviser: REEP,ROGER L.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046641:00001