Think Globally, Act Locally

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Think Globally, Act Locally Using Emergy Analysis to Evaluate Small-Scale, Human-Dominated Systems
Physical Description:
1 online resource (224 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Rothrock, Heather N
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Committee Chair:
BROWN,MARK T
Committee Co-Chair:
DELFINO,JOSEPH J
Committee Members:
COHEN,MATTHEW J
HODGES,ALAN WADE

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
emergy
Environmental Engineering Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Environmental Engineering Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
As global resources become more scarce and harder to obtain, greater attention is focused on quantifying environmental support of human-dominated systems. This research focuses on small-scale systems e.g. communities, households, with the idea that resource consumption begins at smaller scales, to support labor, and that labor then supports not only the system in which it is embedded, but also the next larger system(s). Emergy (spelled with an m) is one methodology that stands apart from other methods because it takes into account the quality and environmental contribution of resources and services. This dissertation quantifies material, energy, and monetary flows in two non-traditional communities and an off-grid residence to determine if alternative systems provide a decrease in resource consumption. A third goal was to analyze urban vs. suburban household metabolism. The emergy analyses of three communities showed co-housing community members required two times, and the ecovillage, three times as much labor support, than an average suburban community. While residents of both intentional communities use fewer resources (kwh of electricity, gallons of water) per capita, the ecovillage and co-housing residents have similar emergy support (5.67E16 sej/capita, 8.24E16 sej/capita, respectively), compared to an average suburban community (7.37E16 sej/capita). Next, it was determined there was not a significant difference between urban and suburban household metabolism, a surprising result since urban regions have been found to have higher areal empower intensities in previous studies. Finally, the emergy evaluation of the off-grid house determined it took 4.41E15 sej/m2 to construct the house, a value approximately two times higher than standard construction. However, long term there may be resource savings due to low annual operational costs (0.05 E15 sej/m2/yr). Emergy of service tended to dominate all emergy analyses in this dissertation, a reminder of how all human-inhabited systems are linked with the economy. Overall, this dissertation provided a more solid theoretical framework for the emergy methodology ability to not only better analyze small-scale, human-dominated systems, but also provided alternative solutions to previously unresolved problems within emergy analysis field of study.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Heather N Rothrock.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: BROWN,MARK T.
Local:
Co-adviser: DELFINO,JOSEPH J.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046589:00001