Cycles of Opposition

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Cycles of Opposition Reform Politics and Congressional Development, 1879-2010
Physical Description:
1 online resource (478 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Huder, Joshua Carstens
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Political Science
Committee Chair:
DODD,LARRY CLOYD
Committee Co-Chair:
ROSENSON,BETH ANN
Committee Members:
SMITH,DANIEL A
WALD,KENNETH D
ADAMS,SEAN P

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
congress -- development -- legislative -- politics -- procedure
Political Science -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Political Science thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The legislative process fundamentally affects politics and influence in Congress. Procedural power is frequently synonymous with policymaking power. A member's ability to amend a bill's language or prevent a vote only extends as far as their procedural influence allows. Throughout congressional history internal battles for procedural power have changed legislative procedures. Congressional development is therefore tied to these internal struggles. Previous research has largely examined these changes and developments from an internal perspective. This dissertation takes a different approach, examining procedural reform from the outside-in. Internal struggles for procedural power are frequently personified in the public sphere. Actors interested in changing the legislative process often make actions intent on drawing attention to their goals. In other words, procedural battles are often very public spectacles. This dissertation argues that these public actions are vital to Congress's institutional development. The public face of procedural reform has influenced the timing, debate, and character of major congressional reforms. Large accumulations of reform activity spur major reforms in both chambers. Put simply, public reform activity spikes just prior to major procedural changes. This public dynamic has hugely affected how and when Congress changes. Additionally, patterns in public politics activity also shed light on Congress's broad institutional development. I argue they uncover a cycle of legislative development in the House. Major public reform movements have led to vacillations in procedural power in the House. The relative influence of parties and committees were outlined in these changes. Ramifications from these changes were enormous. They had a huge effect on legislative behavior and politics, and broadly shape the outlines of legislative eras in Congress. The public face of procedural reforms offers fundamental insights to our knowledge and understanding of Congress's development and history.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Joshua Carstens Huder.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: DODD,LARRY CLOYD.
Local:
Co-adviser: ROSENSON,BETH ANN.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046560:00001