The Flower of Southern Manhood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Flower of Southern Manhood Race and Masculinity in Southern Higher Education, 1820-1900
Physical Description:
1 online resource (281 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Cooper, Thomas C
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
History
Committee Chair:
LINK,WILLIAM
Committee Co-Chair:
GALLMAN,JAMES MATTHEW
Committee Members:
ADLER,JEFFREY S
WISE,BENJAMIN EVAN
TERZIAN,SEVAN G

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
college -- education -- gender -- history -- manhood -- masculinity -- race -- south
History -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
History thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This study examines the gender ideals of black, white, and Native American college students in the South from 1820 to 1900. Higher education was an increasingly common experience in the nineteenth century and offers a unique opportunity to observe how men thought about masculinity and manhood. Immersed in a youth culture away from home, young students had to wrestle with the meaning of adulthood and manliness. Through examining student writings at the University of North Carolina, the University of Virginia, Washington College, and the Virginia Military Institute, this work traces the rise of a more restrained, evangelical masculinity in the white elite by the 1840s that began to supplant the older, more bellicose masculinity in which insults frequently precipitated violent retribution. Restrained masculinity developed from the increasing reach of the market, urbanization, and evangelical religion. During the Civil War, even restrained manhood became more violent, shaped by the pro-war rhetoric of professors and campus chaplains by spring 1861. This study traces the continuation of violent honor after the Civil War and the extensive role white college students played in saving white southern men from the emasculation of military defeat. White college students were integral to the propagation of Lost Cause mythology and the postwar white supremacy campaign of violence and intimidation designed to recreate the antebellum southern patriarchy.This work analyzes Native American and African American masculinity in southern higher education after the Civil War. Students' ideals of manhood illuminate Indian and African American resistance to the regulations and ideologies of the accommodationist and assimilationist vocational schools like Hampton Institute and Tuskegee Institute. This study identifies four kinds of Native American student masculinity based on reactions to Anglo-American cultural indoctrination, ranging from massive resistance to acculturation. Black vocational students believed manhood meant freedom from the type of forced manual labor they were expected to perform in exchange for their education. Middle-class African Americans at liberal arts colleges tended to champion a vision of masculinity built on equal citizenship and sought to demonstrate physical and intellectual equality with whites. This section draws from student organization records, students newspapers, and school disciplinary reports.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Thomas C Cooper.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: LINK,WILLIAM.
Local:
Co-adviser: GALLMAN,JAMES MATTHEW.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046530:00001