Grasping and Manipulation Force Control for Coordinating Multi-Manipulator Robotic Systems with Proprioceptive Feedback

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Material Information

Title:
Grasping and Manipulation Force Control for Coordinating Multi-Manipulator Robotic Systems with Proprioceptive Feedback
Physical Description:
1 online resource (208 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Van Wyk, Karl
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Committee Chair:
WIENS,GLORIA JEAN
Committee Co-Chair:
CRANE,CARL D,III
Committee Members:
BAROOAH,PRABIR
BURKS,THOMAS FRANCIS
YAMOKOSKI,JOHN DANIEL

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
calibration -- cooperative-control -- force-control -- grasping -- manipulation -- robotics
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Mechanical Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Robust robotic grasping and manipulation is a multi-faceted problem with many different strategies. A robust strategy must surely be able to compensate for unforeseen dynamic disturbances and model uncertainty - traits present in the real, dynamic world. This dissertation completed the following objectives: 1) investigated and developed the necessary preliminary functionalities for robotic grasping and manipulation, and 2) created two new controllers unique in their strategy that impart accurate and robust grasping and manipulation capabilities for multi-manipulator systems. There are two underlying functionalities that must exist for a collection of manipulators to properly grasp or manipulate an object. First, these manipulators must possess the ability to measure slip velocity at their respective point of contact with an object. Neurophysiological research indicates that slip related sensory signals are fundamental to proper and stable grasping or manipulation of an object. In this research, fingertip sensors are calibrated to produce a binary slip sensing signal. Furthermore, assuming continuous slip velocity sensing, an algorithm is developed that directly exploits these signals to update the states of an object for direct feedback. Finally, since grasping and manipulation are cast as a force control problem, a new Lyapunov-based nonlinear admittance controller is developed that produces end-effector force tracking control. This approach will illuminate a rather under-developed, yet valid, control strategy for manipulator force control. The pinnacle of this research is the actual design of new grasping and manipulation controllers. These controllers are designed using Lyapunov-based control theory, and handle the many uncertainties in the dynamic system including object mass distribution and dynamic disturbances. Unlike current state-of-the-art strategies, fixed contact locations are not assumed, persistent contact is ensured, minimum and maximum allowable contact forces are customizable, and strictly setting an internal grasping force a priori is effectively removed. The overall impact of the research presented in this dissertation is providing a strategy that properly synergizes biologically inspired grasping modalities and mathematical rigor. The control strategies apply to an arbitrary number of underactuated or fully actuated manipulators. This yields generalized and highly robust grasping and manipulation control capabilities in the presence of epistemic uncertainty and exogenous disturbances.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Karl Van Wyk.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: WIENS,GLORIA JEAN.
Local:
Co-adviser: CRANE,CARL D,III.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-11-30

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046511:00001