Surface Modified NZVI Particles and Ability to Improve Arsenic Removal Efficiency, Colloidal Stability and Reduce Contam...

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Material Information

Title:
Surface Modified NZVI Particles and Ability to Improve Arsenic Removal Efficiency, Colloidal Stability and Reduce Contaminant Bio Availability towards Aquatic Organisms
Physical Description:
1 online resource (140 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Llaneza, Veronica L
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Committee Chair:
BONZONGO,JEAN-CLAUDE J
Committee Co-Chair:
KOOPMAN,BEN L
Committee Members:
GAO,BIN
POWERS,KEVIN WILLIAM
ROSAL,ROBERTO

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
arsenic -- nanoparticle -- removal -- toxicity
Environmental Engineering Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Environmental Engineering Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The degradation of our nation's water quality and the resulting pollution is a critical issue that requires innovation in drinking water technologies. A case and point is the issue of arsenic contamination of water resources, which is well documented and a serious global health problem. In the US, an action limit has been put forth by the EPA, and the maximum contaminant level, MCL previously set at 50 ppb has been lowered to match the World Health organization's safe limit for drinking water of 10 ppb Conversely there is a need for novel and efficient water treatment technologies to help meet the new MCL and protect water quality. In this PhD work, the high reactivity and specific surface area and the decrease kinetic reaction time offered by the nano zero valent iron, nZVI particles to remove As from aqueous solutions through a combination of sorption mechanisms was investigated. nZVI particles were surface modified by polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP and batch sorption studies were conducted by equilibrating PVP coated and uncoated nZVI particles and As contaminated water. The effects of key water chemistry parameters on As removal were also investigated. The PVP coated nZVI resulted in decreased aggregation and enhanced dispersed suspensions as compared to bare nZVI. However, this sorption capacity was negatively impacted by pH and increasing concentrations of competitive anions. Overall, results showed that PVP nZVI particles can effectively remove As from solution down to levels below10 ppb. The ultimate goal of this research program was to develop a water filtration unit for As removal and other toxic metals. Development of a hybrid resin, where PVP coated nZVI particles doped strong base anion exchange resins removed As from solution down to 2.77 ppb in 24hs compare to 17.88 ppb by conventional resins was successful. In conjunction, toxicity assays were ran to determine the impact of coated and uncoated nZVI in the aquatic environment. Results showed iron based NP As removal efficiency decreased the bioavailability of contaminates interaction with organisms in both Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna as well as decreasing toxicity response. Furthermore, the physicochemical characteristics and colloidal stability as a factor of toxicity was also explored.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Veronica L Llaneza.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: BONZONGO,JEAN-CLAUDE J.
Local:
Co-adviser: KOOPMAN,BEN L.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046500:00001