Insights into the Mechanisms of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) Speciation and Implications for Organism-SWCNT Int...

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Material Information

Title:
Insights into the Mechanisms of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) Speciation and Implications for Organism-SWCNT Interactions
Physical Description:
1 online resource (163 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Clar, Justin G
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Committee Chair:
BONZONGO,JEAN-CLAUDE J
Committee Co-Chair:
ZIEGLER,KIRK JEREMY
Committee Members:
BOYER,TREAVOR H
ZIMMERMAN,ANDREW R

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
carbon -- nanotubes -- nantechnology -- separation -- toxicity
Environmental Engineering Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Environmental Engineering Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Nanotechnology is one of the fasting growing sectors of the economy, both in the United States and globally. The development of new novel electronic deceives and consumer products that take advantage of the unique properties of engineering nanomaterials will inevitably lead to their release in the environment from intentional disposal, or non point release throughout produce life cycles. A nanomaterial of particular interest is the single-walled carbon nanotube. (SWCNT) Published data on the potential for SWCNTs to have negative biological effects on aquatic organisms has been conflicting, likely due to the heterogeneous nature of SWCNT powders. The goal of this dissertation was to elucidate potential differences in biological response of test organisms based on the electronic character of the particular SWCNT in question. A mechanistic study was completed to better understand the forces that drive the separation of SWCNT species through the use of selective adsorption on hydrogels. Additionally, insights from the mechanistic study were used to understand how slight changes to the experimental procedure, including hydrogel used in separation, and initial concentration of SWCNT suspensions can be used to optimize both the selectivity and quality of the separation. Optimized process settings were then used to obtain SWCNT fractions of sufficient purity for use in toxicological analysis. The findings presented in this dissertation help clarify conflicting reports of SWCNT toxicity to aquatic test organisms. The results highlight the differences between biological responses when test organisms are exposed to pure fractions of SWCNT separated by their electronic type. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of understanding the potential toxicity induced by dispersants commonly used in SWCNT process as a driver for toxicity response, and not the inherent characteristics of the SWCNTs themselves. Finally, these results set the framework for the development of simple bench scale test with carbohydrate containing hydrogels to be used as an initial screening approach and predictor of SWCNT toxicity when released into aquatic systems
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Justin G Clar.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: BONZONGO,JEAN-CLAUDE J.
Local:
Co-adviser: ZIEGLER,KIRK JEREMY.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046498:00001