Mapping Power Relations in the Alternative Food Movement

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Material Information

Title:
Mapping Power Relations in the Alternative Food Movement Uneven Resistance to Inequality in the Spaces of Food Labor and Urban Land Use Politics
Physical Description:
1 online resource (606 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Sbicca, Joshua A
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Sociology, Sociology and Criminology & Law
Committee Chair:
MAYER,BRIAN M
Committee Co-Chair:
PERZ,STEPHEN GEORGE
Committee Members:
BROAD-WRIGHT,KENDAL L
SCHWARTZ,KATRINA Z

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
alternative-food-movement -- environmental-sociology -- food -- food-justice -- labor -- land -- power -- social-movements -- space -- urban-agriculture
Sociology and Criminology & Law -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Sociology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
While the alternative food movement (AFM) is making notable gains in spreading environmentally sustainable production and consumption practices, problems such as labor exploitation and limited land access and use prominently remain. To get at this gap, this dissertation asks two questions that investigate the potential for the AFM to integrate goals of social justice into their projects and activism: 1) How do economic, political, and social forces shape sites of alternative food activism?; 2) In what ways does alternative food movement activism alter and/or resist various sociospatial relations of power? To help answer these questions, I first theoretically synthesize a number of literatures to argue for the importance of taking a sociospatial, dialectical, and multi-institutional approach to understanding the relationships between exploitation, domination and resistance. Specifically, I focus on issues tied to labor practices and perspectives, and land use laws, public space and private property. I use a comparative historically informed ethnographic case study method to investigate three social movement organizations, each in a different California metropolitan area (San Diego, Oakland, and Los Angeles). I triangulate three data sources: seven months of fieldwork, roughly two and a half months with each organization, 20-40 hours per week; 70 semi-structured in-depth interviews, one to two hours each and; almost 200 archival sources including newspapers, reports, blogs, YouTube videos, social media, and internal documents. I find that there is mixed potential for the AFM to integrate concerns of social justice and advance this through its projects and activism. Given uneven economic, political, and social structuring forces operating in different territorial, scalar, and place based ways, the landscape of resistance for the AFM varies. Explaining this variance is the following: the degree to which organizations and their networks of resistance recognize and act upon non-food social forces impacting their goals; the degree and form of organizational embeddedness in political and economic institutions, and the ability to use this for movement goals; the form of land use law strategic leveraging to institutionalize models of community economic development; the creative forms of social solidarity generated by diverse segments of the AFM across a range of identities. In short, despite common struggles regarding food labor and land use laws across an array of contexts, the AFM engages in diverse, often contradictory sociospatial practices as it resists and alters relations of power.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Joshua A Sbicca.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: MAYER,BRIAN M.
Local:
Co-adviser: PERZ,STEPHEN GEORGE.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046496:00001