The Material Remains

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Material Remains Discursive Consequences of the Upgrade Path
Physical Description:
1 online resource (27 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Short, Caroline Stone
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
English
Committee Chair:
DOBRIN,SIDNEY IRWIN
Committee Co-Chair:
SANCHEZ,RAUL,JR
Committee Members:
GRIES,LAURIE ELLEN
SANFORD,ANN WHITNEY

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
digital -- discourse -- e-waste -- media -- new -- virtual
English -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
English thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This dissertation engages both writing studies and new materialist scholarship to make an intervention in the field of media studies. Specifically, this project is situated within and suggests revisions to media archaeology, a field which looks at older technologies in order to understand their implications for contemporary digital media. This project considers previous studies of emergences and suggests, following Charles Acland, that a residual model of media change offers a productive way forward for the field. While many studies have considered older media objects when they were new, a residual model allows for a consideration of how obsolete technologies remain influential after they have been discarded. Through writing studies, this dissertation suggests new ways of conducting media archaeological work through examining, in addition to often-overlooked obsolete electronic technologies, the scholarly discourse used to describe these technologies. Central to this work is the argument that discourse has lasting material consequences. This project uses data analytics to trace how the rise in popularity of certain discourse about electronic technologies. I look at the consequences of the surge in popularity of the phrase "new media" in the 1990s and argue that this phrase furthered a false division between "old" and "new" media that continues to elide the consequences of older forms of electronic devices. This project also traces the rising use of "the virtual" to refer to electronic technologies and looks at the implications this phrase has for how the public conceptualizes contemporary drone warfare and the use of virtual reality therapy for P.T.S.D. Further investigating the material consequences of digital technologies, I consider the lifecycle of a microchip from production to use to disposal as a useful anecdote for thinking through the networks of influence in which media objects emerge, circulate, and decay. The final chapter of this dissertation considers artists' creative repurposing of electronic waste, the work of tactical media practitioners, and the punk aesthetic of early zines in the 1970s. I propose a punk media archaeological method for studying discarded electronic technologies, a method that works toward making visible the often-hidden "seams" of digital interfaces.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Caroline Stone Short.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: DOBRIN,SIDNEY IRWIN.
Local:
Co-adviser: SANCHEZ,RAUL,JR.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046470:00001