Living Labor

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Living Labor Motherhood as Exchange in the Victorian Novel
Physical Description:
1 online resource (233 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Marinaro, Francesca M
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
English
Committee Chair:
GILBERT,PAMELA K
Committee Co-Chair:
SNODGRASS,CHRIS G
Committee Members:
PAGE,JUDITH WALLICK
TRAVIS,PATRICIA A

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
exchange -- literature -- motherhood -- theory -- victorian
English -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
English thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This study combines feminist theory with exchange and gift theory to analyze Victorian texts that map the cultural construction of the figure of the Victorian mother through the language of production and consumption. My work joins feminist scholarship on the maternal body with Viviana A. Zelizer's work on child value in the nineteenth century and Jill Rappoport's study of Victorian women's relationship to gift economy, introducing what I term the regressive versus progressive maternal narrative to reveal the impact of nineteenth-century practices of production and consumption on constructing the figure of the Victorian mother. Rappoport's work points to the representation of women in Victorian Literature and culture as "selfless givers" to measure the value of women in terms of their "reproductive output." Drawing upon this discussion, I define the regressive maternal narrative as one in which motherhood operates as compensatory exchang-the "later return," in Rappoport's terms, for a husband's "initial outlay" of offering a woman security and stability in marriage. Conversely, in the progressive maternal narrative, woman appropriates her motherhood not as mere remuneration, but as a vehicle of empowerment which she directs onto her communit-whether family, nation, or race. I argue that examining this shift from the regressive to the progressive maternal narrative through the language of exchange allows us to consider how viewing mothers alternately as producers and commodities impacted the ways that Victorian women influenced networks of family, industry, and empire.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Francesca M Marinaro.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: GILBERT,PAMELA K.
Local:
Co-adviser: SNODGRASS,CHRIS G.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046452:00001