Development of Sensors for Monitoring Oxygen and Free Radicals in Plant Physiology

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Material Information

Title:
Development of Sensors for Monitoring Oxygen and Free Radicals in Plant Physiology
Physical Description:
1 online resource (138 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Chaturvedi, Prachee
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Committee Chair:
MCLAMORE,ERIC
Committee Co-Chair:
PULLAMMANAPPALLIL,P C
Committee Members:
HAUSER,BERNARD A
CORRELL,MELANIE J
BOYER,TREAVOR H

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
opticalsensor -- oxygensensor -- rossensor
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Oxygen plays a critical role in the physiology of photosynthetic organisms, including bioenergetics, metabolism, development, and stress response. Oxygen levels affect photosynthesis, respiration, and alternative oxidase pathways. Likewise, the metabolic rate of spatially distinct plant cells (and therefore oxygen flux) is known to be affected by biotic stress (e.g., herbivory) and environmental stress (e.g., salt/nutrient stress). During aerobic metabolism, cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a byproduct. Plants also produce ROS during adaptation to stress (e.g., abscisic acid (ABA) mediated stress responses). If stress conditions are prolonged, ROS levels surpass the capacity of detoxifying mechanisms within the cell, resulting in oxidative damage. While stress response pathways such as ABA-mediated mechanisms have been well characterized (e.g., water stress, inhibited shoot growth, synthesis of storage proteins in seeds), the connection between ROS production, oxygen metabolism and stress response remains unknown. In part, this is because details of oxygen transport at the interface of cell(s) and the surrounding microenvironment remains nebulous. The overall goal of this research was to develop oxygen and Free radical sensors for studying stress signaling in plants. Recent developments in nanomaterials and data acquisition systems were integrated to develop real-time, non-invasive oxygen and Free radical sensors. The availability of these sensors for plant physiologists is an exciting opportunity to probe the functional realm of cells and tissues in ways that were not previously possible.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Prachee Chaturvedi.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: MCLAMORE,ERIC.
Local:
Co-adviser: PULLAMMANAPPALLIL,P C.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046444:00001