Domestication Syndrome in Cultured Fish

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Material Information

Title:
Domestication Syndrome in Cultured Fish Reduced and Irregular Feeding Induces More Wild-Like Behaviors in Cultured Florida Bass, Micropterus Floridanus, but Does Not Improve Post-Stocking Survival
Physical Description:
1 online resource (56 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Monk, Christopher T
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and Conservation
Committee Chair:
LORENZEN,KAI
Committee Co-Chair:
ST MARY,COLETTE MARIE
Committee Members:
ALLEN,MICHEAL S

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
aquaculture -- behavior -- domestication -- fisheries -- personality
Forest Resources and Conservation -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Cultured fish undergo a process of domestication that affects multiple attributes of their biology and often results in phenotypes that do not survive well in the wild. I tested the hypothesis that the changes in multiple biological attributes represent a coherent ‘domestication syndrome’ rooted in fundamental changes in resource availability and allocation. Using Florida bass (Micropterus floridanus) as a model system, I manipulated feed availability in culture to mimic the lower and irregular availability in the wild. I then tested the effects of this manipulation by comparing behavioral attributes (boldness, sociability and activity) and survivorship among cultured juveniles raised in conventional (hatchery) and manipulated (low/irregular feed) treatments and wild juveniles. I found that reduced and irregular food provisioning produced cultured fish that more closely resembled wild fish with respect to behavior. This did not translate into increased survival in ponds as both cultured treatments had lower survivorship than wild fish and there was no difference between them. This may be because activity, which emerged as a key predictor of survival in wild fish, was not influenced by the feed manipulation.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Christopher T Monk.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: LORENZEN,KAI.
Local:
Co-adviser: ST MARY,COLETTE MARIE.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046376:00001