Effect of Task Complexity on Acoustic Characteristics of Parkinsonian Speech

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Effect of Task Complexity on Acoustic Characteristics of Parkinsonian Speech
Physical Description:
1 online resource (113 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Anand, Supraja
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Communication Sciences and Disorders, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
Committee Chair:
ROSENBEK,JOHN CLYDE
Committee Co-Chair:
SHRIVASTAV,RAHUL
Committee Members:
WINGATE,JUDITH MAIGE
SAPIENZA,CHRISTINE M
SMITH,BRENDA JO

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
acoustics -- diadachokinesis -- parkinson -- speech
Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Communication Sciences and Disorders thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Given the high prevalence of speech impairments in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD), acoustic analysis of speech patterns could help understand and identify PD. Early identification through speech analysis is especially favorable because it is non-invasive, can be done remotely (telemonitoring) and is cost and time efficient for the patient. Only very few recent experiments have shown the feasibility of using acoustic measures to identify PD related speech deficits primarily due to the lack of sensitivity of acoustic measures for early stage speech deficits and/or due to the nature of elicitation tasks (i.e. simple tasks such as phonations, reading and conversation).  In contrast, because complex vocal tasks such as maximum performance tasks overcome compensatory mechanisms, they can reveal important information about the integrity of the speech system and provide greater accuracy for early detection purposes. The most common maximum performance task to assess speech motor performance in individuals with PD has been the measurement of articulatory coordination through diadochokinetic (DDK) tasks. However, conventional DDK testing involves measurement of only rate and regularity characteristics. In this dissertation, a new articulatory measure, human factor cepstral coefficient (HFCC), has been compared to conventional DDK rate and regularity. The relationship between DDK rate and other variables are also investigated to examine the trade-off between speed and accuracy.  In individuals with PD, pitch variability has typically been investigated through sustained vowel phonation or singing tasks using fundamental frequency (f0) measures (e.g. standard deviation, range). In these cases, a complex vocal pitch control task could help in evaluating their ability to make laryngeal adjustments as quickly and as accurately as possible. Additionally, this task is based on the assumption that laryngeal control will be affected in early stages of the disease process. Therefore a pitch DDK task, where patients were asked to glide between low and high pitch as fast as possible was explored in a second experiment.  Findings from this study show promising trends. Evidence for reduction in articulation range was demonstrated through a new DDK task /papupi/. Cepstral measures of articulation were found to be significantly reduced in PD. Further, delta measures averaged across the different DDK tasks classified control and PD subjects with high accuracy (73%). Rise range and slope of the pitch contour during the pitch glide task significantly differentiated individuals with PD from controls with an overall accuracy of 70%. Thus, the novel measures and tasks examined in this study provide support for acoustic measures as a tool towards identification of PD. A combination of measures evaluating different speech dimensions or systems (e.g. voicing, articulation, prosody) will provide greater specificity.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Supraja Anand.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: ROSENBEK,JOHN CLYDE.
Local:
Co-adviser: SHRIVASTAV,RAHUL.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046285:00001