Neurophysiological Correlates of Tourette Syndrome

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Material Information

Title:
Neurophysiological Correlates of Tourette Syndrome
Physical Description:
1 online resource (87 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Maling, Nicholas G
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Medical Sciences, Neuroscience (IDP)
Committee Chair:
OKUN,MICHAEL S
Committee Co-Chair:
STREIT,WOLFGANG JAKOB
Committee Members:
SANCHEZ,JUSTIN C
KHOSHBOUEI,HABIBEH
HASS,CHRISTOPHER J
FOOTE,KELLY D

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
dbs -- neurophysiology -- tourette
Neuroscience (IDP) -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Medical Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a complex and relatively common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by involuntary actions known as tics, and high rates of comorbidity with other neuropsychiatric disorders. While the etiology is unknown, a confluence of evidence suggesting a diffuse subcortical network-dysfunction has emerged. In addition to the variety of anatomical and functional changes observed in subcortical regions of TS subjects, the success of centre-median (CM) thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) for tic reduction further supports the notion of this limbic-motor structures involvement in tic-generation circuitry. Functional techniques for human studies have been limited by either poor spatial or temporal resolution. The use of DBS as a treatment for TS now enables high fidelity electrophysiological experiments examining the activity of single units and local field potentials (LFPs) within behaving humans, and can potentially describe physiological underpinnings of tic generation. We quantifed the effect of long-term DBS on network oscillations within the CM thalamus by using an experimental new DBS device. We observed that DBS therapy applied for 6 months increases the power of oscillations in the gamma range (30-45 Hz), and that this change is correlated with decreased tic severity. Changes in spectral features are indicative of a functional-reorganization of circuitry. To determine how stimulation directly drives thalamic oscillations we examined the oscillatory characteristic of CM thalamus immediately surrounding acute stimulation. We observed that only those stimulation parameters that were clinically efficacious drove gamma band power.These data support the idea that long term DBS therapy causes persistent changes in brain physiology. Finally, we investigated how neurophysiological measures in CM thalamus are correlated with short-term metrics of tic onset. A major barrier to understanding the physiology of tic generation is the lack of knowledge regarding the generation and propagation of signals encoding tic generation. We used DBS guide microelectrodes to record these physiological signals from the CM thalamus. Physiological measures of single unit activity and LFP activity were correlated with behavioral metrics of tic expression with millisecond resolution to describe the participation of this structure in tic circuitry and determine how tic-related modulations of these metrics encode information.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Nicholas G Maling.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: OKUN,MICHAEL S.
Local:
Co-adviser: STREIT,WOLFGANG JAKOB.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046274:00001