Contributions of Hot and Cool Executive Functions for Predicting and Ameliorating Reactive and Proactive Aggression in E...

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Material Information

Title:
Contributions of Hot and Cool Executive Functions for Predicting and Ameliorating Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Elementary Students
Physical Description:
1 online resource (225 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Barber, Brian R
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Special Education, Special Education, School Psychology and Early Childhood Studies
Committee Chair:
SMITH,STEPHEN W
Committee Co-Chair:
GAGNON,JOSEPH
Committee Members:
DAUNIC,ANN PARKER
CROCKETT,JEAN B
MILLER,DAVID

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
aggression -- cool -- executive -- function -- hot -- proactive -- reactive
Special Education, School Psychology and Early Childhood Studies -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Special Education thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Childhood aggression represents a major public health concern, wherein developmental patterns of many aggressive forms yield future instances of delinquency, substance abuse, and school dropout. Recent interest in the relation of executive function (EF) processes and childhood aggression has helped to distinguish dissociable cognitive bases for some aggressive forms. Primary objectives of the present study were to determine the ecological validity of scale measurement for two latent EF factors – a hot, affectively influenced EF factor, and a cool, information processing factor – and to examine concurrent and longitudinal associations between hot and cool EF and reactive and proactive forms of aggression in a sample of children in 4th to 7th grades. Additionally, treatment effects of the Tools For Getting Along (TFGA) curriculum for hot and cool EF, as well as reactive and proactive aggression were investigated by examining treatment outcomes for reactive and proactive sub-groups identified at prior to treatment implementation. Results indicate that teacher-rated deficiencies in hot EF skills increase the level of severity for both reactive and proactive aggression, and that deficiencies in cool EF skills increase the level of severity for reactive, but not proactive aggression. Further, specific patterns of hot and cool EFs predict proactive versus reactive types across the transition from late elementary to middle school. The TFGA curriculum did not produce significant effects for outcomes of hot and cool EF, or for reactive or proactive aggression when investigated with subgroups identified as high in pretreatment reactive or proactive aggression. Additional results and implications for preventive intervention in the school context are provided.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Brian R Barber.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: SMITH,STEPHEN W.
Local:
Co-adviser: GAGNON,JOSEPH.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046260:00001