Animal Use and Community in Pre-Columbian Puerto Rico

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Animal Use and Community in Pre-Columbian Puerto Rico Zooarchaeology of the Rio Portugues
Physical Description:
1 online resource (312 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Duchemin, Geoffrey R
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Anthropology
Committee Chair:
DEFRANCE,SUSAN D
Committee Co-Chair:
KEEGAN,WILLIAM FRANCIS
Committee Members:
MOSELEY,MICHAEL E
SILLIMAN,BRIAN

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
archaeology -- caribbean -- puerto -- rico -- taino -- zooarchaeology
Anthropology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Anthropology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This dissertation presents a zooarchaeological study of three archaeological sites with periods of contemporaneity, that were settled within a single river drainage in pre-Columbian south-central Puerto Rico (600-1500 CE). It is the first study of its kind, and offers a unique opportunity to observe changes in animal use through time and across the region.  The study had three primary goals.  First, I explored the affect of growing social and political influences in the region on the ways in which people used animals for food and ceremony.  Second, I explored how ceremonialism affected animal use, and whether certain animals were more likely to be found in ceremonial contexts.  Third, I explored the nature ofinter-community relationships, as they pertained to animal acquisition,distribution, and perhaps (ceremonial) communal sharing.  The study of animal remains from these sites provides evidence of food acquisition, distribution, and consumption, as well as the use of animals in ceremonialism. The comparative analysis of multiple temporal and spatial contexts indicates growing congruency in the ways people used animals at these sites.  There is also some evidence that certain animals, specifically the guinea pig (an exotic domesticate), may be more associated with ceremony.  Faunal remains may also indicate that certain coastal resources may have been restricted.  Communities may have coordinated efforts to acquire resources at the coast, and maintained relationships through food sharing or ceremony.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Geoffrey R Duchemin.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: DEFRANCE,SUSAN D.
Local:
Co-adviser: KEEGAN,WILLIAM FRANCIS.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046253:00001