Optimization of the Saccharification of Spent Sugar Beet Pulp Using Extracellular Enzymes from Mixed Culture Anaerobic F...

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Material Information

Title:
Optimization of the Saccharification of Spent Sugar Beet Pulp Using Extracellular Enzymes from Mixed Culture Anaerobic Fermentation
Physical Description:
1 online resource (120 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Dube, Patrick J
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Committee Chair:
PULLAMMANAPPALLIL,P C
Committee Co-Chair:
TEIXEIRA,ARTHUR A
Committee Members:
SVORONOS,SPYROS A
PRESTON,JAMES F,III
KOOPMAN,BEN L

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
anaerobic -- beet -- biofuel -- biological -- cellulase -- digestion -- enzyme -- extraction -- hemicellulase -- methane -- pectinase -- pulp -- saccharification -- sugar
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The goal of this research was to develop a system for the releaseof sugars from sugar beet pulp for use in ethanol production.  By designing a system capable of efficientlyreleasing sugars from a waste stream such as sugar beet pulp, the cost ofethanol can be lowered and a reality with a cheap, widely available biofuel cancome closer to fruition. The first step was to determine the time and temperatureneeded to achieve the highest sugar yields from hydrothermolysis pretreatmentfollowed by the optimization of enzymatic saccharification using commercialenzymes.  The optimal time andtemperature for hydrothermolysis pretreatment of sugar beet pulp was 160°C for120 minutes (47.52% of sugars on a dry weight basis were detected).  Saccharification using commercial enzymes wasfound to be most effective when loading undiluted pectinase (72.98%saccharification) with pectinase and hemicellulase added in equal amounts andincubating for one hour, closely behind (72.88%).  Increasing incubation times was also testedwith the pectinase and hemicellulase mixture and it was found that 86.77% totalsaccharification was possible when incubated for 24 hours.  Following optimization using commercial enzymes, theeffect of extracted enzymes from mesophilic and thermophilic mixed culturefermentors was tested and compared to commercial enzymes.  Extraction of enzymes for use insaccharification found enzymatic activity of pectinase, hemicellulase andcellulase.  Reported activities werehigher in cell free samples versus biofilm and at thermophilic temperaturesversus mesophilic.  Increasing theloading rate of sugar beet pulp from 100 g to 250 g resulted in the highestreported enzymatic activities (60.71 µmol/mL/hr for hemicellulase and 50.57 µmol/mL/hrfor pectinase). Using thermophilic cell free extracted enzymes to saccharifypretreated sugar beet pulp, saccharification was found to be 53.12%, anincrease of 17.13% after hydrothermolysis. The effect ofcommercial enzymes on the overall methane yield in a two stage anaerobicdigester was also tested.  Gas yieldswere overall higher when thermophilic temperatures were used, peaking at 197.52L CH4/kg VS with 95% of the gas being made in 27.5 days.  The addition of cellulase commercial enzymeswas not found to increase the overall yield of methane gas.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Patrick J Dube.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: PULLAMMANAPPALLIL,P C.
Local:
Co-adviser: TEIXEIRA,ARTHUR A.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046242:00001