Multiple Stressor Interactions and Effects on Embryo Development of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus Polyphemus

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Multiple Stressor Interactions and Effects on Embryo Development of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus Polyphemus
Physical Description:
1 online resource (177 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Vasquez, Maria C
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology
Committee Chair:
JULIAN,DAVID
Committee Co-Chair:
HANSEN,PETER J
Committee Members:
DENSLOW,NANCY D
BAKER,SHIRLEY M

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
development -- limulus -- multiple -- polyphemus -- stressors
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Organisms in coastal marine habitats experience environmental stressors that may affect their survival and performance. Exposure to thermal stress, hypo-salinity stress and hypoxia occur in coastal habitats and exposure to each stressor in isolation may inhibit growth, development and even result in death. However, organisms in their natural habitat experience multiple environmental stressors that can interact in ways that may not be predicted from single stressor exposures. The goal of my dissertation research has been to investigate how multiple environmental stressors interact and affect development of a coastal marine invertebrate, the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. I first examined whether nesting horseshoe crabs from the Florida Gulf Coast deposit their eggs in microclimate conditions within the sand that maximize embryo development. The results demonstrate that nests are deposited in locations where oxygen and temperature conditions promote development while minimizing sulfide exposure. I next examined whether multiple environmental stressors interact synergistically to negatively influence embryo development by exposing newly-fertilized eggs from a population in the Florida Gulf Coast to treatment combinations of temperature, salinity, and oxygen. These results demonstrate that multiple stressors negatively influence development by acting synergistically. Finally, I examined whether the multiple stressor tolerance of L. polyphemus differs across a latitudinal range, between genetically distinct and geographically isolated populations, using fertilized eggs from Delaware Bay, DE, for comparison. I exposed these eggs to treatment combinations of temperature, salinity, and oxygen, similar to those used in the Florida study. Fertilized eggs from Delaware Bay respond similarly to multiple stressor exposures compared to eggs from the Gulf Coast of Florida, suggesting that Delaware Bay eggs do not have a limited stressor tolerance. However, the Delaware Bay eggs were more sensitive to hypo-salinity stress, which may reflect the microclimate conditions found within the sand where they incubate and develop. These three interrelated studies demonstrate that multiple environmental stressors exist in natural habitats and can affect embryo development in ways not predicted from single stressor studies. In addition, the data show that microclimate conditions within the sand play an important role in influencing multiple stressor exposure and tolerance of both populations investigated
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Maria C Vasquez.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: JULIAN,DAVID.
Local:
Co-adviser: HANSEN,PETER J.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046231:00001