Source Depletion Model Parameter Estimation at Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Contaminated Sites

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Material Information

Title:
Source Depletion Model Parameter Estimation at Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Contaminated Sites
Physical Description:
1 online resource (159 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Wang, Fang
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Committee Chair:
ANNABLE,MICHAEL D
Committee Co-Chair:
JAWITZ,JAMES W
Committee Members:
TOWNSEND,TIMOTHY G
HATFIELD,KIRK

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
dissolution -- dnapl -- flow -- modeling -- pattern -- prediction -- source
Environmental Engineering Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Environmental Engineering Sciences thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Simplified predictable source depletion models that can accurately describe dense nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution are useful to guide remediation in source zones and evaluate risk assessment in down gradient plumes. This dissertation explored how to estimate source depletion model parameters at field scales. A partitioning tracer test was used to parameterize a simplified source depletion equilibrium streamtube (EST) model, at a PCE-contaminated field site, which suggested that keeping the screen interval the same during tracer tests and remediation greatly increase the accuracy of the PCE dissolution prediction. Combining multiple types of data (such as push-pull tracer test data and soil core data) along with partitioning tracer test data can improve the parameterization of the EST model based on an investigation at a TCE contaminated field site. Flow configuration influence on travel time variability was investigated through numerical simulations. Not only aquifer heterogeneity influences travel time variability,but also flow configuration plays an important role on travel time variability especially for complex forced gradient flow pattern (such as dipole or five-spot flow patterns). Travel time variability estimated based on one flow pattern(e.g., five-spot) can not be directly used for a different flow pattern (e.g.,natural gradient flow pattern). However, the simulation results provided a means to convert between flow patterns. Moreover, complex flow patterns can be adjusted to reduce nonuniform flow and converge toward a natural gradient flow pattern (e.g. a weak dipole with the ratio of injection to the pumping rate less than 0.1 is similar to a natural gradient flow pattern). Solutions of spatial transect mass discharge and spatial moments were explored with different site ages to inversely estimate source depletion model parameters and the estimated results were used to predict subsequent dissolution. The results indicate that transects that cover the entire plume can greatly decrease uncertainties of predicted mass discharge especially for a young site. The spatial mass discharge method performed better than the spatial moment methods,however, spatial moments may have advantages in other aspects such as using scattered three dimensional plume concentration data directly rather than constructing transects within the plume.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Fang Wang.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: ANNABLE,MICHAEL D.
Local:
Co-adviser: JAWITZ,JAMES W.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046230:00001