Peripheral and Central Factors in Female Pelvic Pain

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Material Information

Title:
Peripheral and Central Factors in Female Pelvic Pain
Physical Description:
1 online resource (74 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Alappattu, Meryl J
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Rehabilitation Science
Committee Chair:
BISHOP,MARK DONALD
Committee Co-Chair:
GEORGE,STEVEN
Committee Members:
ROBINSON,MIKE E
FILLINGIM,ROGER BENTON

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
female -- pain -- pelvic
Rehabilitation Science -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Rehabilitation Science thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a non-malignant continuous or recurrent pain of structures related to the pelvis that lasts at least three months and is associated with negative cognitive, behavioral, sexual, and emotional consequences.  Women with pelvic pain exhibit higher pelvic floor muscle pain and pain sensitivity at parts of the body distal from their pelvic region, which may be suggestive of enhanced central nervous system pain processing. The relationship between local and distal pain sensitivity and psychosocial factors in pelvic pain is unclear.  The first purpose of this study is to determine how women with pelvic pain differ from healthy women in response to pain sensitivity testing and in reports of pain-related psychosocial factors to understand the potential influence of these factors on pain and sexual dysfunction.  The second purpose was to determine how an analgesic ointment affected local and remote pains ensitivity in women with pelvic pain. No differences existed in pain sensitivity at local or remote sites in women with pelvic pain compared to healthy women. Women with pelvic pain exhibited greater pain-related psychosocial involvement compared to healthy women. Affective and sensory aspects of painand the presence of sexual dysfunction, in addition to local and remote pain perception, were significantly correlated with intercourse pain.  Results of aim 2 indicated that only pain ratings at the upper and lower vestibule were significantly lower in the lidocaine condition. No significant changes in any other local site or remote sites in response to lidocaine or placebo ointments compared to the natural history condition. This study indicates that a decrease in pain at the local pelvic region does not necessarily affect pain sensitivity at remote body sites. Thus, clinicians who treat pelvic pain should consider using multi-faceted interventions that target central pain mechanisms, such as cognitive behavioral strategies, and interventions aimed at decreasing the local and remote perception of pain.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Meryl J Alappattu.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: BISHOP,MARK DONALD.
Local:
Co-adviser: GEORGE,STEVEN.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0046220:00001