Of Populations, Habitat and People

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Material Information

Title:
Of Populations, Habitat and People the Asian Elephant in a World Fast Changing
Physical Description:
1 online resource (107 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Goswami, Varun R
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Committee Chair:
OLI,MADAN KUMAR
Committee Co-Chair:
FLETCHER,ROBERT JEFFREY,JR
Committee Members:
NICHOLS,JAMES D
AUSTIN,JAMES D
SUNQUIST,MELVIN E
CHELLAM,RAVI

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
conflict -- conservation -- elephant -- fragmentation -- habitat
Interdisciplinary Ecology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Interdisciplinary Ecology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Strategies that can reconcile local livelihoods and wildlife habitat needs are extensively debated in conservation science and policy. Certain land uses outside protected areas (PAs) have the potential to meet this conservation objective and are therefore considered to be ‘wildlife-friendly.’ However, the increased human-wildlife interface in these lands can promote conflicts between people and wildlife, thereby reducing wildlife survival and devaluing the conservation potential of these areas. In this dissertation, I used the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) as a case study to investigate the extent to which heterogeneous, human-dominated landscapes can support the conservation needs of endangered and conflict-prone megafauna. I began by evaluating the conservation value of wildlife-friendly land uses relative to PAs in a heterogeneous landscape. I used multistate occupancy models to test if elephant space-use intensity varied among land uses and with human presence outside PAs. I found that elephants did not differentiate between PAs and wildlife-friendly land uses in their overall use of a site, but restricted high-intensity use to sites within PAs. High-intensity use declined with increasing distance to PAs, and this effect was accentuated at higher village densities. Thereafter, I investigated the spatiotemporal drivers of elephant crop depredation––the primary form of human-elephant conflict (HEC)––in lands outside PAs. My novel use of dynamic occupancy models to analyze HEC data supported the possibility of imperfect detection and reporting of conflicts in human-wildlife conflict research. I identified nutritional incentives provided by crops and natural forage limitations brought about by increased rainfall variability, as concomitant drivers of elephant crop depredation.   Finally, I investigated the ramifications of an upward trend in HEC-induced mortality outside PAs on elephant population viability, particularly in the face of habitat loss. I simulated elephant population dynamics under different scenarios of conflict-induced mortality and within-PA habitat loss. Conflict-induced mortality adversely affected population persistence, and its detrimental effects were magnified as the proportion of core habitat within PAs declined. Taken together, my research provides important insights into the conservation value of lands outside PAs, and emphasizes the need for effective conflict management to ensure the persistence of endangered megafauna in heterogeneous, human-dominated landscapes.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Varun R Goswami.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: OLI,MADAN KUMAR.
Local:
Co-adviser: FLETCHER,ROBERT JEFFREY,JR.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046203:00001