Improving Soil Fertility Management in Northern Ghana

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Material Information

Title:
Improving Soil Fertility Management in Northern Ghana An Integrated Modeling Approach
Physical Description:
1 online resource (209 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Alderman, Phillip Dani
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Agronomy
Committee Chair:
BOOTE,KENNETH J
Committee Co-Chair:
SOLLENBERGER,LYNN E
Committee Members:
BENNETT,JERRY M
JONES,JAMES W
SERRA,RENATA
NAAB,JESSE

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
carbon -- farming -- fertility -- household -- integrated -- modeling -- pigeonpea -- simulation -- smallholder -- soil -- systems
Agronomy -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Agronomy thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Declining soil fertility is a major underlying cause of malnutrition and disease in northern Ghana. Continuous cropping of land without adequate nutrient return has depleted soil fertility. With increasing population pressure, traditional land management will be inadequate to maintain fertility.  Further, diverse farming households in northern Ghana face different demands and constraints depending on household composition and access to resources.  Thus, appropriate agricultural policy and soil fertility management approaches are needed to address these challenges. In order to understand the effects of agricultural policy and soil fertility management strategies on smallholder livelihood systems of northern Ghana, several studies were undertaken. First, a two-year on-farm field study in northern Ghana showed that a single planting of pigeonpea or groundnut increased subsequent maize yield by 500 to 600 kg per ha, but did not show significant differences in soil N or soil organic C (SOC). A second study documented the adaptation of the CROPGRO model within Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer Cropping System Model (CSM) for simulating pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) through parameter estimation.  The study demonstrated that the adapted model could reliably simulate pigeonpea growth and development under diverse conditions. A third study confirmed that the CSM can simulate trends in SOC and crop yields under different crop sequences when the stable SOC fraction is initialized properly, but revealed the inadequacy of three predominant SOC fraction initialization methods. A fourth study investigated the effects of N fertilization level and crop rotation on long-term SOC and crop yield under West African conditions.  It concluded that optimum management would combine legume rotation, residue retention, and fertilization with 20 to 60 kg N per ha to mitigate SOC loss while maintaining maize yield. A final study provided an integrated assessment of agricultural policy impacts on household cash, food security, pigeonpea adoption, and soil fertility for diverse smallholder households in northern Ghana.  This study demonstrated the potential of a dynamic household model for policy analysis and suggested that policy should include fertilizer subsidies, promotion of crop residue retention, and investment in breeding for leafspot-resistance in groundnut and adaptation of pigeonpea to northern Ghana.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Phillip Dani Alderman.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: BOOTE,KENNETH J.
Local:
Co-adviser: SOLLENBERGER,LYNN E.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046202:00001