Species Dispersal Behavior and Connectivity in Fragmented Landscapes

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Material Information

Title:
Species Dispersal Behavior and Connectivity in Fragmented Landscapes
Physical Description:
1 online resource (113 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Vasudev, Divya
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Committee Chair:
FLETCHER,ROBERT JEFFREY,JR
Committee Co-Chair:
AUSTIN,JAMES D
Committee Members:
SIEVING,KATHRYN E
KAINER,KAREN A
RAMAKRISHNAN,UMA

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
connectivity -- conservation -- dispersal -- fragmentation -- movement
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Connectivity conservation is rapidly emerging as a powerful strategy to ameliorate threats of habitat fragmentation and climate change to species persistence. Dispersal across landscapes, or the movement of individuals or genes, is crucial for functional connectivity. Yet connectivity assessments and prioritization often neglect species dispersal behavior. I propose filling this gap in current connectivity conservation through an extension of niche theory, whereby dispersal limitations are described in terms of the species dispersal niche, an n-dimensional hyperspace wherein successful dispersal occurs. I described a framework for identifying the dispersal niche through spatial, environmental and intrinsic limitations. Spatial, and to a lesser extent, environmental limitations have been emphasized in connectivity conservation, but intrinsic limitations have largely been neglected in the past. I therefore assessed the influence of two intrinsic limitations on connectivity patterns in fragmented landscapes. First, I evaluated the effect of post-dispersal reproductive success, specifically determined by distance-mediated mate choice, in limiting connectivity among small populations. I used a modeling framework,parameterized from long-term demographic data on the common chimpanzee Pan troglodytes. Mate choice can either augment or negate the effect of distance-limited dispersal, dependent on the nature of distance-mediated mate choice. Second, I empirically assessed the influence of canopy gap on movement probability of an arboreal species, the western hoolock gibbon Hoolock hoolock. Further, I compared rankings of conservation areas obtained from movement constraints to ranks based on ignoring landscape heterogeneity, and those based on location (or habitat-use) data. I found that incorporating movement limitations provided different rankings of conservation areas, as compared to measures that consider the landscape as homogeneous. In addition, there were discrepancies in conservation rankings based on location data, as compared to those obtained from movement data. Quantifying movement constraints of species may be particularly important in heterogeneous landscapes. I argue that systematically incorporating movement limitations of species into our understanding of connectivity can increase the accuracy and robustness of assessments and prioritization. The framework I proposed can facilitate such a move, and in addition, can spur mechanistic, threat-based, and ultimately more effective management of connectivity in the current context of environmental change.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Divya Vasudev.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: FLETCHER,ROBERT JEFFREY,JR.
Local:
Co-adviser: AUSTIN,JAMES D.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046201:00001