Speech Made Unable

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Material Information

Title:
Speech Made Unable Inexpressibility, Sublimity, and Nothingness in King Lear and Its Reception
Physical Description:
1 online resource (218 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Newlin, James T
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
English
Committee Chair:
BURT,RICHARD
Committee Co-Chair:
HARPOLD,TERRY ALAN
Committee Members:
SHOAF,RICHARD ALLEN
KLIGERMAN,ERIC MATTHEW

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
bysshe -- charles -- coleridge -- crisis -- epideixis -- hazlitt -- jacques -- king -- lacan -- lamb -- lear -- percy -- psychoanalysis -- rhetoric -- romanticism -- samuel -- shakespeare -- shelley -- sublime -- taylor -- william
English -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
English thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
In this dissertation, I examine the role that King Lear plays as a paradigm for the discourse of the Sublime in British Romanticism.  I argue that this rhetorical move misrecognizes the play’s famous, difficult conceptualization of nothingness, and that the more radical attention paid to the play by Søren Kierkegaard and Jacques Lacan begins to offer a corrective to this misrecognition. The British Romantics’ praise of King Lear should be understood in terms of epideixis, the branch of classical rhetoric dedicated to arguments of display (generally, praise and blame). In their epideictic readings of Lear, the Romantics do not only praise the play, but seek to re-display the play.  Examining the works of Shelley, Coleridge, Hazlitt, and Lamb, I identify the Romantics’ conventional praise of King Lear as an instance of psychological defense.  In a critical reaction formation, the Romantics invoke conventions of classical rhetoric—exempla, the topoi of inexpressibility and outdoing—in order to decry classical rhetoric as a mode of sublimity. In the second half of the dissertation, I examine the attention paid to Lear by two post-Romantic thinkers: the philosopher and theologian, Søren Kierkegaard, and the psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan.  Kierkegaard and Lacan’s rhetorical orientation, unlike the Romantics, is founded upon recognition, rather than display.  The references to Lear in Kierkegaard’s “indirect communication” and in the transcriptions of Lacan’s seventh seminar indicate an interrogation of Romantic critical ideals.  However, even Kierkegaard and Lacan respond anxiously to the play’s nihilistic vision. Examining the history of defensive readings of King Lear is more than just a curiosity for literary historians; it illuminates the play’s distinctive traumatic narrative.  My primary concern in this dissertation is a clearer understanding of Shakespeare’s masterpiece and what I identify as its crisic core.  I read the reception history of Lear as prefigured by the play itself: the complicated praise of Lear in the first scene of the play redoubled as literary history’s complicated praise of Lear.  The crises of recognition that we experience reading King Lear are authored by Shakespeare, in much the same way that an analyst enables a transference.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by James T Newlin.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: BURT,RICHARD.
Local:
Co-adviser: HARPOLD,TERRY ALAN.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046124:00001