Modeling the Dissipation of Storm Surge by Coastal Wetlands

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Material Information

Title:
Modeling the Dissipation of Storm Surge by Coastal Wetlands
Physical Description:
1 online resource (112 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Lapetina, Andrew J
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering, Civil and Coastal Engineering
Committee Chair:
SHENG,YEAYI P
Committee Co-Chair:
SHEREMET,ALEXANDRU AURICA
Committee Members:
VALLE-LEVINSON,ARNOLDO
BROWN,MARK T

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
hurricane -- modeling -- vegetation -- wetlands
Civil and Coastal Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Coastal wetlands have long been described as natural buffers to storm surge, however, this assertion has not been quantified or examined in great scientific detail.  This study first examines flow through a vegetation canopy using a 1DV TKE model.  This model is both compact and robust enough to simulate flows within a 3D storm surge-wave model(CH3D-SWAN).  Using this vegetation-resolving 3D model, several issues are addressed in each chapter of this dissertation. First, the 1DV model is introduced, validated, and demonstrated.  The contrasts between 2Dand 3D simulations of storm surge events are shown, and the improvement of the3D vegetation-resolving storm surge model over the 2D model is demonstrated.  Then, questions regarding the ability of coastal vegetation to dissipate storm surge are addressed.  It is shown that tall, dense, and wide canopies are more capable of dissipating storm surge than their shorter,sparser, and narrower counterparts, and that fast moving storms have more dissipation than slower storms.  In one experiment, it shown that the dissipation varies from 5-40% depending upon canopy characteristics.  In another, it is shown that storm-dependent dissipation varies from 10-25%.  Finally, the impacts of vegetation on Hurricane Ike, a storm which struck the Texas coastline in 2008 are evaluated.  The vegetation model reduced errors within vegetation-laden Chambers County from 17.9% to 9.6%.  Other findings from this simulation of Hurricane Ike are included.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Andrew J Lapetina.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: SHENG,YEAYI P.
Local:
Co-adviser: SHEREMET,ALEXANDRU AURICA.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046117:00001