Challenging the Paradigm of Monarch Migrations

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Challenging the Paradigm of Monarch Migrations Behavioral Complexity and Isotopic Variation of the Eastern North American Population of Danaus Plexippus
Physical Description:
1 online resource (129 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Chaffee, Carol L
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Zoology, Biology
Committee Chair:
WAYNE,MARTA L
Committee Co-Chair:
BURLEIGH,JOHN GORDON
Committee Members:
MACFADDEN,BRUCE J
DANIELS,JARET C
REED,DAVID LEE
BAKER,SHIRLEY M

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
behavior -- butterfly -- genetic -- isotope -- migration -- monarch -- population -- stable -- structure
Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Zoology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Movement is one of the key factors that influences evolution. My dissertation uses the unique migration behavior of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) to investigate the effects of migratory behavior on population structure. Although monarchs are not yet endangered as a species, their migration is facing a variety of threats. Migration may be key to the stability of the species, for example by preserving or redistributing genetic variation. Understanding how movement influences the distribution of genetic variation across an organism’s range is particularly important in conservation genetics. I used an approach that integrated genetic and stable isotope analyses to answer three research questions: 1) To what degree is the resident population in South Florida connected with the main migratory population? 2) Has the summer breeding range expanded northward? 3) Do monarchs from different origins mix in the Mexican overwintering colonies? I found that migrants from throughout the summer range enter the resident South Florida population, but that the degree of connectivity is different for males and females. Males immigrating to South Florida also appear to be in worse nutritional condition than either butterflies originating in the resident population or migrants to Mexico, but are larger than resident males. My results indicate that monarchs are breeding well north of the published breeding limit, and that monarchs originating north of the putative breeding limit are successfully migrating to the overwintering colonies in Mexico. Finally, genetic variation is homogeneously distributed across the overwintering colonies in Mexico, but there are subtle differences between the overwintering colonies in origins of the butterflies at each colony. Thus, overwintering colonies are not equivalent. Overall, my dissertation shows that monarch movement produces patterns with greater fine-scale complexity than had previously been described. Because of the conservation implications this complexity, future work investigating the processes that produce these patterns is warranted.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Carol L Chaffee.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: WAYNE,MARTA L.
Local:
Co-adviser: BURLEIGH,JOHN GORDON.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046095:00001