Biology of the Green Turtle Chelonia Mydas in the Galapagos Islands

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Material Information

Title:
Biology of the Green Turtle Chelonia Mydas in the Galapagos Islands
Physical Description:
1 online resource (173 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Zarate Bustamante, Patricia Magaly
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Zoology, Biology
Committee Chair:
BJORNDAL,KAREN ANNE
Committee Co-Chair:
BOLTEN,ALAN BRUCE
Committee Members:
SILLIMAN,BRIAN
PERCIVAL,HENRY F
DUTTON,PETER
SEMINOFF,JEFFREY ALEKSANDR

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
biology -- conservation -- foraging -- galapagos -- growth -- islands -- isotopes -- migration -- predation -- reproduction -- seaturtles
Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Zoology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
I present here an investigation of several aspects of the biology of the green turtle Chelonia mydas in the Galápagos Islands. The Galápagos Archipelago is one of the most important rookeries for green turtles in the eastern Pacific Ocean, but it also provides important foraging grounds for the species. Therefore, I had an excellent opportunity to conduct research on different developmental stages and habitats of green turtles. First, I examined sea turtle natural history around the oceanic and continental islands in the eastern Pacific Ocean. I found that sea turtle populations inhabiting these islands are impacted by human induced threats, particularly by invasive species and fisheries interactions. Next, I examined hatching and emergence success of green turtle nests in the Archipelago. I found relatively low values of hatching and emergence success compared to those of other green turtle populations in the world, due to the combination of predation by beetles, feral pigs, and nest destruction by nesting females. I examined foraging ecology and migratory patterns of green turtles within and among foraging and nesting grounds through the use of stable isotope analysis. I found substantial variation in ?13C and ?15N values of sea turtle skin within each foraging ground; the data suggested that green turtles in Galápagos are not exclusively herbivorous. I tested whether stable isotope analysis could be used to discriminate between resident and migrant females in Galápagos. However, I found no distinctive groups within the nesting aggregation that could be interpreted as representing different foraging strategies. I also evaluated growth rates of green turtles and hawksbills captured at foraging grounds in Galápagos. I confirmed that growth rates of green turtles in Galápagos are the slowest ever reported for green turtles anywhere in the world. Growth rates in Galápagos are significantly different for the two morphs, and significantly affected by body size, and foraging site. Together, this research has improved our knowledge of the green turtle in the Galápagos Islands by focusing on aspects of their biology at different developmental stages and on critical habitats. The information provided here will help managers of the Galápagos National Park to effectively protect and conserve sea turtles and their habitats.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Patricia Magaly Zarate Bustamante.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: BJORNDAL,KAREN ANNE.
Local:
Co-adviser: BOLTEN,ALAN BRUCE.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046087:00001