Ecology and Conservation of Eumaeus Atala Poey 1832 (Lepidoptera; Lycaenidae)

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Material Information

Title:
Ecology and Conservation of Eumaeus Atala Poey 1832 (Lepidoptera; Lycaenidae)
Physical Description:
1 online resource (295 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Koi, Sandra E
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Entomology and Nematology
Committee Chair:
DANIELS,JARET C
Committee Co-Chair:
MILLER,JACQUELINE Y
Committee Members:
MILLER,CHRISTINE WHITNEY

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
atala -- butterflies -- florida -- imperiled -- rocklands -- tropical
Entomology and Nematology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Entomology and Nematology thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Southeast Florida is part of the Caribbean archipelago and a biodiversity hotspot for conservation priorities, with many endangered species precinctive to the Lower Peninsula. The tropical butterfly Eumaeus atala Poey 1832 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), once considered extinct, has made a significant population increase in southeast Florida during the past thirty years, but the few published papers that mention life history traits contain numerous discrepancies and conjectures. Regardless of the insect’s tentative recovery, it is considered “Imperiled” by the State of Florida because of its unpredictable crash-eruption cycles, isolated colonies located in fragmented and endangered pine rockland habitats, as well as its high vulnerability to stochastic weather events. A lack of knowledge about its biology and life history complicates recovery efforts. Relocation projects have been developed by the author in conjunction with Miami-Dade County authorities and other non-governmental agencies to restore Atala butterfly colonies in historically occupied pine rockland natural areas, as well as in domestic gardens. This captive-rearing intensive was initiated to fill in critical gaps of information relating to its overall biology and ecology, understand potential constraints to conservation and recovery, and ultimately construct best management practices to strengthen successful reintroductions of the butterfly serving to increase understanding of other pine rockland remnant-reliant butterfly taxa, such as Bartram’s Hairstreak (Strymon acis).
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Sandra E Koi.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: DANIELS,JARET C.
Local:
Co-adviser: MILLER,JACQUELINE Y.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0046035:00001