Sexual Selection for Maternal Care in a Biparental Fish

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Material Information

Title:
Sexual Selection for Maternal Care in a Biparental Fish
Physical Description:
1 online resource (155 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Hilber, Samantha A
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Zoology, Biology
Committee Chair:
ST MARY,COLETTE MARIE
Committee Co-Chair:
BROCKMANN,H J
Committee Members:
PAGE,LARRY M
KIMBALL,REBECCA T
MILLER,CHRISTINE WHITNEY

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
behavior -- care -- cichlid -- fish -- mating
Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Zoology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
The evolution of parental care is typically examined from a natural selection perspective, in that parental investment has no other benefit or role beyond increasing offspring survival. However, some studies across taxa have demonstrated that care can be used in the context of mate effort. If parental care behavior are used in mate attraction and mating competition, then the tradeoff between parental investment in offspring survival, i.e., natural selection, and mate attraction, i.e., sexual selection, is relaxed. While this idea has primarily been examined in species with paternal care, it is likely to apply to species with biparental care. Given that parental care by both parents is critical for offspring survival in these species, both males and females benefit from having a good parent as a mate, and thus may also benefit from using parental behavior in mate choice and mating competition. The overall goal of this work was to further our understanding of the interplay of natural selection and sexual selection in shaping patterns of parental investment. We examined the role of female female competition and mate choice in shaping parental territory defense using manipulative experiments. We found that male convict cichlid fish, but not females, prefer mates that provide high levels of parental care. Furthermore, parental females increase a key parental behavior, i.e., brood defense, when an intruder is also attractive to their mate, i.e., a large conspecific female. Thus, contrary to life history expectations, sexual selection for care appears to be acting most strongly on females in this biparental species. In addition, we examine the interplay between sexual selection and biparental care theoretically, using dynamic state variable modeling, to specifically investigate whether sexual selection may play a role in the evolutionary transition from biparental to female only care a frequent transition in the Family Cichlidae. This work extended our understanding of the interplay of sexual selection and natural selection on parental behavior to a biparental context. This is particularly valuable because sexual selection has generally been considered to be weak or non-existent in biparental species.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Samantha A Hilber.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2014.
Local:
Adviser: ST MARY,COLETTE MARIE.
Local:
Co-adviser: BROCKMANN,H J.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2016-05-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2014
System ID:
UFE0045943:00001