Adaptive Capacity and Climate Change Adaptation in Rural South Africa

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Adaptive Capacity and Climate Change Adaptation in Rural South Africa Temporal, Network, and Agrarian Dimensions
Physical Description:
1 online resource (208 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Schramski, Samuel C
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Committee Chair:
BARNES,GRENVILLE
Committee Co-Chair:
MCCARTY,CHRISTOPHER
Committee Members:
RUSSO,SANDRA L
SCHMINK,MARIANNE C

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
adaptation -- africa -- household -- networks -- ntfps -- vulnerability
Interdisciplinary Ecology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Interdisciplinary Ecology thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Do households in the Eastern Cape of South Africa demonstrate adaptive capacity to climate change, as measured by their structural importance, livelihood diversity, household health, and perceptions of environmental change? I explore this question through the lens of adaptive capacity. I use it as an analytic heuristic but I also seek to add meaning to adaptive capacity as a practitioners’ framework. I do this through an exploration of South African communities sharing comparable social-ecological conditions, yet which are expected to have variable responses to climate change. These two rural communities in arguably South Africa’s poorest yet most biodiverse province vary immensely in composition and demographics. Nevertheless, they are similar in their reliance upon the land and its natural resources. Foremost, I analyze whether households and communities differ in their adaptive capacities. I choose a temporal analysis in Chapter 2 to address past, present, and future as a means to compensate for time-based studies of human dimensions of climate change without the availability of a longitudinal design. The results of Chapter 2 demonstrate that no single replacement for longitudinal studies of adaptive capacity are likely possible, but methods such as oral history, livelihood surveys, and fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs) may provide direction. Social network analysis (SNA) and network social capital, addressed in Chapter 3, undergird much of this dissertation and are used to explore the transition between these scales. I use SNA to articulate adaptive capacity more fully, highlighting the importance of network social capital; the results indicate that strong relationships exist between survey and networks approaches to adaptive capacity. In Chapter 4 I explore agrarian change and the current prevalence of non-agrarian livelihoods in rural South Africa. This chapter expands upon an understanding of adaptive capacity on rural landscapes under transformation in the Eastern Cape. Finally, in Chapter 5 I conclude that my research will expand upon work on networks and rural livelihood change in the developing world.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Samuel C Schramski.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: BARNES,GRENVILLE.
Local:
Co-adviser: MCCARTY,CHRISTOPHER.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2015-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0045809:00001