<%BANNER%>

Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Topmodel for the Hydrological Simulation of the Grise River Catchment

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045456/00001

Material Information

Title: Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Topmodel for the Hydrological Simulation of the Grise River Catchment
Physical Description: 1 online resource (150 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Beneche, Joseph Antoine
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: analysis -- flood -- modelling -- sensitivity -- uncertainty -- watershed
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This study aimed at simulating the hydrological behavior ofthe Grise River watershed which is one of the most vulnerable watersheds inHaiti. It is mountainous in the upstream and flat flood-prone plain in thedownstream. TOPMODEL which a semi-distributed model essentially based ontopography that divides the catchment into contributing areas was used toperform the simulation. Five years (1999-2002) time series of 3 hours rainfall andpotential evapotranspiration, downloaded from the North American RegionalReanalysis (NARR) project, were used for the hydrological simulation. Soil datawas obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and other studiesrealized in this catchment. A 30m DEM wasobtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and ReflectionRadiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM).Both global (FAST and Morris Methods) and Local(OAT)sensitivity analyses were performed and revealed that the scaling of thedecrease the transmissity with depth (m), the transmissivity, the hydraulicconductivity (k0), the SrMax and the channel flow parameter (vr) influencedthe application of TOPMODEL in the Grise River catchment in regards to the typeof flows. Other parameters such as capillary drive (CD) influence also theresponse of the watershed but on a smaller scale
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Joseph Antoine Beneche.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local: Adviser: Martinez, Christopher J.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID: UFE0045456:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045456/00001

Material Information

Title: Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Topmodel for the Hydrological Simulation of the Grise River Catchment
Physical Description: 1 online resource (150 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Beneche, Joseph Antoine
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: analysis -- flood -- modelling -- sensitivity -- uncertainty -- watershed
Agricultural and Biological Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Agricultural and Biological Engineering thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This study aimed at simulating the hydrological behavior ofthe Grise River watershed which is one of the most vulnerable watersheds inHaiti. It is mountainous in the upstream and flat flood-prone plain in thedownstream. TOPMODEL which a semi-distributed model essentially based ontopography that divides the catchment into contributing areas was used toperform the simulation. Five years (1999-2002) time series of 3 hours rainfall andpotential evapotranspiration, downloaded from the North American RegionalReanalysis (NARR) project, were used for the hydrological simulation. Soil datawas obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and other studiesrealized in this catchment. A 30m DEM wasobtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and ReflectionRadiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM).Both global (FAST and Morris Methods) and Local(OAT)sensitivity analyses were performed and revealed that the scaling of thedecrease the transmissity with depth (m), the transmissivity, the hydraulicconductivity (k0), the SrMax and the channel flow parameter (vr) influencedthe application of TOPMODEL in the Grise River catchment in regards to the typeof flows. Other parameters such as capillary drive (CD) influence also theresponse of the watershed but on a smaller scale
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Joseph Antoine Beneche.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local: Adviser: Martinez, Christopher J.

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID: UFE0045456:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

1 SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TOPMODEL FOR THE HYDROLOGIC AL SIMULATIO N OF THE GRISE RIVER CATCHMENT By JOSEPH ANTOINE BENECHE A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FUL FILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 201 3

PAGE 2

2 2013 Joseph Antoine Beneche

PAGE 3

3 To my family and the memory of my brother, Pierre Jonas Beneche

PAGE 4

4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First I am very grateful to Dr. Chri stopher Martinez, for his guidance. Without his help I would not be able to complete my degree. Thank you to Dr Rafael Mu oz Carpena and Dr William Wise for their advice and for accepting to be on my Committee Than k s to the WINNER /USAID (Watershed Initi ative for National Natural Resources) project for funding my study. Many than k s to Di Tian, Yogesh Khare Dr. Delva I ng Ivelt Chery and everyone who has helped during the entire process, from the application for the scholarship to the completion of the degree.

PAGE 5

5 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 LIST OF TABLES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 8 LIST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 9 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ................................ ................................ ........................... 11 ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 12 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 14 Problem Statement ................................ ................................ ................................ 14 Objectives ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 17 2 LITERATURE REVIEW ................................ ................................ .......................... 18 Hydrological Modeling ................................ ................................ ............................. 18 Model Classification ................................ ................................ ................................ 18 Deterministic Versus Stochastic Models ................................ ........................... 18 Lumped Versus D istributed Models ................................ ................................ .. 19 Runoff Generation Mechanisms ................................ ................................ ............. 19 Infiltration Excess Overland Flow ................................ ................................ ..... 20 Spatial Area Infilt ration Excess Overland Flow ................................ ................. 20 Saturation Excess Overland Flow ................................ ................................ .... 20 Subsurface Stormflow ................................ ................................ ...................... 21 Hydrological Response Process ................................ ................................ ............. 21 Characterization of the Hydrological Response ................................ ................ 21 Transformation of Rainfall in Hydrograph ................................ ......................... 22 Production function ................................ ................................ .................... 22 Transfer function ................................ ................................ ........................ 24 Sensitivity Analysis in Hydrological Modeling ................................ ......................... 27 Sensiti vity Analysis Method ................................ ................................ .............. 28 Local SA (LSA) ................................ ................................ .......................... 28 Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) ................................ ............................... 29 Uncertainty Analysis in Hydrological Modeling ................................ ....................... 31 3 WATERSH ED PRESENTATION ................................ ................................ ............ 35 Watershed Location ................................ ................................ ................................ 35 Physical Characteristics of the Watershed ................................ .............................. 36 Hydrology and Hydrogeology ................................ ................................ ........... 36

PAGE 6

6 Climatology ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 37 Geomo rphology and Soils ................................ ................................ ................ 37 Vegetation and Land Use ................................ ................................ ................. 38 4 MODEL PRESENTATION ................................ ................................ ...................... 48 Model Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 48 Basic TOPMODEL Equations ................................ ................................ ................. 49 Assumptions ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 52 ................................ ................................ ... 52 Model Applicability ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 53 Model Inputs ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 53 TOPMODEL Parameters ................................ ................................ ........................ 54 TOPMODEL Parameters Sensitivity ................................ ................................ ....... 55 Topographic Index ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 57 Output of TOPMODEL ................................ ................................ ............................ 57 5 METHODOLOGY ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 59 Sensitivity Analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ 59 Sensitivity Analysis Process ................................ ................................ ................... 59 Determination of Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) of Input Parameters ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 59 Generation of Input Factor Samples ................................ ................................ 66 Computation of the Model Output for Each Scenario ................................ ....... 67 Analysis of the Output Distribution ................................ ................................ ... 68 Data Elevation Model (DEM) ................................ ................................ .................. 69 Topographic Index ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 69 Data ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 70 M odel Run ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 70 6 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS ................................ ................................ ............. 79 Model Justification for the Watershed ................................ ................................ ..... 79 DEM of the Catc hment ................................ ................................ ............................ 79 Topographic Index Results ................................ ................................ ..................... 80 Sensitivity Analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ 81 Local Sensitivity Analysis (OAT) ................................ ................................ ....... 81 Global Sensitivity An alysis ................................ ................................ ................ 82 Morris sensitivity analysis ................................ ................................ ........... 83 FAST sensitivity analysis ................................ ................................ ........... 86 Discussions of the Parameters Impacts ................................ ........................... 89 The m parameter ................................ ................................ ....................... 89 The Sr Max parameter ................................ ................................ .................. 90 The ks parameter ................................ ................................ ....................... 91 The vr parameter ................................ ................................ ....................... 92 The parameters td and CD ................................ ................................ ......... 92

PAGE 7

7 Discussions of the Sensitivity Analysis Results ................................ ................ 93 FAST Uncertainties ................................ ................................ ................................ 93 7 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ................................ ..................... 113 Conclusions ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 113 Recommendations ................................ ................................ ................................ 116 APPENDIX A MORRIS CODE IN R ................................ ................................ ............................ 118 B FAST CODE IN R ................................ ................................ ................................ 122 C MATLAB CODE ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 126 D PARAMETERS CALCULATIONS ................................ ................................ ......... 141 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................. 142 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ .......................... 150

PAGE 8

8 LIST OF TABLES Table page 3 1 Slope classification in the watershed ................................ ................................ .. 39 3 2 Soil properties in the catchment based on ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 4 0 3 3 Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity classified by USDA Soil Texture (Rawls, 1998 ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 41 5 1 Summary statistics of CD (cm) parameter for various soil types ........................ 71 5 2 TOPMODEL parameters and their values for GSA ................................ ............ 72 5 3 TOPMODEL parameters and their values for LSA ................................ ............. 73 6 1 Three (3) hours sensitivity Indexes for the Morris Analysis ................................ 95 6 2 Three (3) hours sensitivity Indexes for the FAST First Order Analysis ............... 96 6 3 Three (3) hours sensitivity Indexes for the FAST Total Order Analysis .............. 97 6 4 Uncertainty analysis statistics for probability distributions obtained from the FAST results ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 98

PAGE 9

9 LIST OF FIGURES Figure page 2 1 Hydrological response of a catchment (Musy, 2001) ................................ .......... 33 2 2 Land Use and Hydrological response. From Sauchyn (s. d.). ............................ 34 2 3 Hydrological response of a catchment (Musy, 2001) ................................ .......... 34 3 1 Grise River catchment location ................................ ................................ ........... 42 3 2 Towns overlappe d by the catchment ................................ ................................ .. 43 3 3 Grise River in dry season view ................................ ................................ ........... 44 3 4 Hydrographic network ................................ ................................ ......................... 45 3 5 River Grise left bank ................................ ................................ ........................... 46 3 6 Grise River catchment land use ................................ ................................ .......... 47 4 1 The relation between topography, topographic index ad soil moisture deficit ..... 58 5 1 Decrease of the hydraulic conductivity with average depth ................................ 74 5 2 Derivation of an estimate of parameter m using recession curve analysis under exponential transmissivity profile assumption (Beven, 2001) ................... 75 5 3 Recession curve for the third week of December, 2011 ................................ ..... 75 5 4 Recession curve for the first two weeks of January, 2012 ................................ .. 76 5 5 Bridge of Croix des Missions in dry seasons ................................ ...................... 76 5 6 Bridge of Croix des Missions in rainy seasons ................................ ................... 77 5 7 Shape of the channel at the stages gauge ................................ ......................... 77 5 8 Distribution of the channel velocity inside the catchment ................................ ... 78 6 1 DEM of the River Grise catchment ................................ ................................ ..... 99 6 2 Map of the area processed by R TOPMODEL ................................ ................. 100 6 3 Areal distribution of the Topographic Index ................................ ...................... 101 6 4 OAT sensitivity of the pa rameters for the minimum flows ................................ 102

PAGE 10

10 6 5 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Median flows ................................ .... 102 6 6 OAT sensitivity of the par ameters for the Average flows ................................ .. 103 6 7 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Maximum flows ................................ 103 6 8 OAT sensitivity of the par ameters for the Total flows ................................ ....... 104 6 9 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the minimum flows .................... 105 6 10 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the Median flows ....................... 105 6 11 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the Average flows ..................... 106 6 12 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the maximum flows ................... 106 6 13 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the Total flows .......................... 107 6 14 FAST Sensitivity for the Total order indexes of the parameters ........................ 108 6 15 FAST Sensitivity for the First order indexes of the parameters ......................... 108 6 16 FAST Sensitivity for the interactions of the parameters ................................ .... 109 6 17 Probability distribution of the mimimum flows ................................ ................... 110 6 18 Probability distribution of the median flows ................................ ....................... 110 6 19 Probability distribution of the average flows ................................ ..................... 111 6 20 Probability distribution of the maximum flows ................................ ................... 111 6 21 Probability distribution of the total flows ................................ ............................ 112

PAGE 11

11 LIST OF ABBREVIATION S ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASCII American Standard Code for Information Interchange ASTER Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer CD Capillary Drive CDF Cumulative Distribution Frequency CN Curve N umber. CNIGS Centre Nationale de l Information GeoS patiale DEM Data Elevation Model FAO Food and Agriculture Organization FAST Fourier Analysis Sensitivity Test GDEM Global Digital Elevation Model HWSD Harmonized World Soil Database MARNDR Dev eloppement Rural MOE NARR North American Regional Reanalysis OAT One at a time PDFs Probability Density Function SA Sensitivity Analysis SCS Soil Conservation System TI topographic index TWI Topographic Wetness Index UNESCO Uni ted Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization USDA United State Department of Agriculture

PAGE 12

12 Abstract of the T hesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for th e Degree of Master of Science SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TOPMODEL FOR THE HYDROLOGICAL SIMULATION OF THE GRISE RIVER CATCHMENT By Joseph Antoine Beneche May 2013 Chair: Christopher Martinez Major: Agricultural and Biological Engineering T his study aimed at simulating the hydrological behavior of the Grise River wat ershed which is one of the most vulnerable watersheds in Haiti. TOPMODEL was used to perform the simulation. This is a semi distributed model essentially based on topography that divides the catchment into contributing areas Five years (199 9 2002) time series of 3 hours rainfall and potential evapotranspiration obtain ed from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) project, were used for the simulation. Soil data was obtai ned from the Food and Agriculture Organization ( FAO ) and other studies realized in this catchment A 30m DEM was obtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) Both global (FA ST and Morris Me t hods) and Local(OAT) sensitivity analyses were performed and reveal ed that the decay of the decrease of transmissity with depth (m) the logarithm of the transmi ssivity the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) the Sr Max and the channel flow param eter (vr) influenced the application of TOPMODE L in the River Grise catchment in regards to diferent type of flows. Other parameter s such as capillary drive (CD) influence also the response of the watershed but on a smaller scale.

PAGE 13

13 Ranges of variation of di ff erent type s of flows were also determined in this study. However measured data is necessary to con firm the performance of TOPMODEL in the watershed.

PAGE 14

14 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Problem S tatement Scientific evidence based on long term observations showed that climate change and climate variability have influenced the natural resources particularly Water resources around the world (Olivier and Hidore, 2002; Brekke, et al. 2009). Spati al and temporal variability of r ainfall and, consequently, streamflow regimes have obviously changed. In most of the United States for example, precipitation and streamflow have increased for the second half of the 20th century (Lettenmaier, et al., 2008). Rainfall in West Africa has indicated a continuous decrease since 1960s whil e recursive anomalies have been observed in East a nd North East of Africa ( Moreda, 1999). As a result of the climate variability and climate change, problems related to water have increased. Water shortages, poor water quality and flood damages have been increasingly observed all over the world. Parallel, population growth, agricultural expansion to meet the food needs and industrial growth have increased the demand on freshwater. Agriculture itself consumes 70% of the worldwide freshwater. Despite the fac there is scarcity or shortage of water, scientific research has predicted that climate change and variability and population growth will increase this number to one half of humanity (United Nations Humans Development report, 2006) Problems related to water can even be more remarkable on a watershed scale. In addition to the global effect, local practices can have large impacts on streamflow. Land cover and land use ch anges such as residential and commercial development,

PAGE 15

15 deforestation, reforestation, and wildfires over time can result in changes to basin runoff patterns, which could change flood pea ks flood storage, and other uses. Since land use and land cover have v aried and the climate change and variability issue has become more flagrant, the integrated management and allocation of the water resources to satisfy the needs of different sectors are the challenges decision makers have been facing (Simonovic, 2002). It has become urgent to link research with improved water m anagement. The allocation of water resources in a more efficient way among competing needs requires a better monitoring, assessment, an d forecasting of the resources. In this context, scientists have been looking for more efficient ways to assess the hydrological processes within the watersheds. As a result, many hydrologic models, which have become an essential tool for water resources planning, development, and management, have been built to model w atershed responses. S patially di stributed rainfall runoff model s have been generated for analyzing the impact of land cover and climate changes on streamflow regimes and surface water bodies (Harrison and Whittington, 2002; Eckhardt and Ulbrich, 2003). The Haitian Watersheds for example are known as some of the most vulnerable in the world due to human activities. While only less than 30 % of the land is suitable for farming activities (Delusca, 1998) more than 60 % of the population has lived in rural area s using traditional farming practices that have led consequently to a drastic decrease in water infiltration and increase in surface runoff (Dautrebande, et al ., 2006). Agricultural activities have been practicing on unsuitable steep lands.

PAGE 16

16 Moreover, Haiti on the primary pathway of tropical storms that initiate in the Atlantic and strike Caribbean islands during hurricane season, Haiti has long been vulnerable to tropical storms and hurrica nes. However a significant increase in severe natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, landslides has been observed for the last decade. Flash floods have been the most important problems the eroded watersheds have faced leading t o enormous loss of hu man life. In Haiti, scientific investigation and measurement in the watersheds remain extremely rare. This is mainly due to the scarcity of hydrologic data necessary to conduct studies. There is been a lack of instruments capable to generate the data. The few existing hydrologic stations enable to collect these data were installed very recently. Some studies have been conducted to roughly estimate flood risk in some watersheds, but there is no description of the hydrological processes that intervene in gene rating the floods. The watershed of Cul de Sac which encompasses the River Grise basin remains one of the most priority Haitian watersheds, based upon the population density, the flood risk and the vulnerability of the infrastructures ( Timyan, 2006 ). Other authors such as Smucker et al. (2007) and Smith et al. (2008) have confirmed this conclusion. However none of these studies was able to quantify the hydrological processes happening in the watershed. Thus, this research aims to assess the hydrological re sponse of the River Grise basin using the TOPMODEL

PAGE 17

17 Objective s The simulation of the hydrological response in this watershed with TOPMODEL aims at determining appropriate soil and catchment factors needed to improve flood estimation methods The specific objectives are: 1. Simulati ng the hydrological behavior of the catchment using R TOPMODEL 2. Identifying the controlling parameters of the hydrologic proces ses in the River Grise catchment 3. Predicting the stream discharges in the watershed

PAGE 18

18 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Hydrological Modeling As an important tool for hydrological system investigation, a hydrological model is a mathematical representation of the different components of the hydrologic cycle. They describe mathematica l l y the elements of the water syst em They have been applied on different scales. They can be local to global ; they can be more or less complex based on the scale they are designed to address R ainfall runoff models have been developed for more than thirty years based upon different co ncep ts and perceptions. However, the applicability of some wide ly accepted models may be limit ed by the complexity of hydrological measurement techniques an d lack of measurements in space and time. Model C lassification There have been several ways to classify h ydrological models. The two generic classes are the d etermini stic versus s tochastic models and the l umped versus d istributed models. Deterministic V ersu s S tochastic M odels D eterministic model s represent the hydrological processes based on physical laws T hey take into account no uncertainties in prediction T he variables are free from random variation and have no probability distribution In nature, a deterministic model is one where the model parameters are known or assumed. On the contrary, s tochastic mo dels account for uncertainty in model predictions due to uncertainty in input variables, boundary conditions and / or parameter values. Instead of dealing with only one possible reality of how the process evolves over time, stochastic models can

PAGE 19

19 capture the indeterminacy in its future evolutions described by probability distributions. This is also called a probabilistic model Lumped V ersu s D istributed M odels In l umped models the watershed is treated as a single unit while distributed models divide the wate rshed in several units ( each considered as lumped) that have their own characteristics. In lumped models, the parameters represent the average value over the catchment area. Such models are calibrated us ing actual discharge data and usually use measured o r calculated parameters. Lack of measured discharge data thus limits the application of lumped models. Some assumptions are made when using lumped models. For instance rainfall is considered being uniformly distributed over a watershed basin both spatiall y and temporally over a given time period. In reality, that never happens. (Smith et al 2004b) (Reed et al 2004) For the so called models of distributed parameters the units are more homogenous than the whole watershed. The watershed response is a com posite of the responses of the units. Distributed hydrologic modeling is a developing field around the world and there are many types, philosophies, and lines of work. As an example, one type of distributed hydrologic model is that which tries to integrate the units in order to represent the spatiality of the variables in a simple way. TOPMODEL ( Corral, 2004 ) is such a model. Runoff Generation M echanisms Runoff is one of the most important outputs of all hydrological models. The occurrence of runoff in a ba sin can be explained inclusively by several theories:

PAGE 20

20 Infiltration E xcess O verland F low A l so called Horton overland flow, this mechanism is m ore likely to be significant in areas of low vegetation cov er and high rainfall intensity. Horton ( 1933 ) stated th at runoff occurs when rainfall intensity exceeds infiltration or storage capacity. However, K irkby (1969 ) and Freeze (1972) remarked that in humid temperate regions covered with vegetation infiltration capacities of soils are usually high er than normal rai nfall intensities. Spatial Area Infiltration Excess Overland Flow The properties of the soil vary spatially over the watershed. As a result, the infiltration capacity of the soil is more likely to be different from one point to another. Moreover, due to sp atial variability of surface water inputs, infiltration excess runoff does not always occur over the entire basin during a rainfall event. Betson (1964) stated that the area contributing to infiltration excess runoff may only be a small portion of the drai nage basin. Saturation Excess Overland Flow This mechanism of runoff occurs when in locations where the soil profile becomes completely saturated. In these locations, rainfall intensity does not necessarily exc eed infiltration capacity. Once complete satur ation of the soil occurs at a location all further rainfall becomes overland flow runoff ( Cappus, 1960 ) The complete saturation of the soil usually results in raising the water table near the surface making stream areas susceptible to saturation from bel ow. These areas vary seasonally and are referred to as variable source areas (Beven 2000)

PAGE 21

21 Subsurface Stormflow Over relatively impermeable bedrock water flow s downslope after satisfying some initial depression storage This situation was pointed out by Dunn e and Black in 1979. As a result, when both the soil is deep enough and the capacity of infiltration is high, the streamflow is dominated by the subsurface flow (Beven, 2000). Hydrological Response Process The hydrological response is defined as the r eaction of the basin when it is subjected to precipitation ( Musy, 2005).The watershed is the basic hydrologic unit within which all measurements, calculations and pr edictions are made in hydrology The characteristics of the watershed and the precipitation involve in expressing the hydrological response of the watershed It is usually measured by the amount of water that flows at the outlet. The hydrological response can be graphically represented by the plot of discharge in the channel versus time called a hydrograph or by the plot of the water level versus time which is limn graph I n fact, establishing the relationships between the physical attributes of the catchment and the behavior of the stream or river leaving a watershed has been one of the most impo rtant problem hydrologists have faced in watershed hydrology. Characterization of t he Hydrological Response The hydrological response as represented in the Figure 2 1 can be characte rized in several different ways. The hydrological response can be either null or positive. This is the case when subjected to the precipitation the stream or the river leaving the watershed does not change. The hydrological response is, on the contrary, positive when under the climatic stimuli the flow regime is modified.

PAGE 22

22 As e xpressed in Figure 2 2 the hydro logical response varies with land use. When the hydrological response is positive, it can be fast, delayed, total or partial ( Musy, 2005). 1. Fast: when the response occurs within a relatively short period of time after the ca tchment has been subjected to the solicitation. It is more important in case of surface flow. 2. Delayed: when the lag time is relatively long the respons e is considered to be delayed. It occurs when the contribution of the subsurface is more important in th e runoff generation process. 3. The hydrological respons e is thought of as total when it is composed of both the surface and subsurface flow 4. The hydrological response is considered as partial when it results from either the surface flow or subsurface flow Tr ansformation o f Rainfall i n Hydrograph The transformation of rainfall into hydrograph is obtained by applying successively two functions referred to as production function and transfer function as indicated in the Figure 2 3 Productio n f unction The descri ption of the hydrological response of the watershed solicited by climatic stimuli requires first the understanding and the estimation of flows at the interface soi l vegetation atmosphere This estimation consists in determining the total losses which is th e collective term given to the various processes that act to remove water from the inc oming precipitation before it leaves the watershed as runoff (McCuen et al 2002) These processes are e vaporation, transpiration, interception, infiltration, depression storage, and detention storage.

PAGE 23

23 Several techniques have been proposed for estimating the amount of rainfall lost as abstraction form the effectiv e rainfall that contributes to r unoff. The SCS curve number and the phi index methods are the most frequently used. 1. The SCS method accounts for abstractions as the difference between the volumes of rainfall and runoff. It relates runoff depth to rainfall depth. The Equation (2 1) expresses the Runoff as computed by SCS. ( 2 1 ) R and P are respectively the runoff and the precipitation depth; and the maximum watershed retention S is given in Equation ( 2 2 ) ( 2 2 ) CN is a runoff index called the runoff curve number. The total loss is separated into two parts: the initial abstraction I a and the retention. The initial abstraction is related to CN by the empi rical equation as shown in Equation ( 2 3 ) ( 2 3 ) 2. The phi index method assumes a constant rate of abstraction over the duration of the stor m. These total abstraction methods simplify the calculation of storm runoff rates ( McCuen et al 2002). Mathematically the phi index method for modeling losses is described by (Theodore et al 1987) in the Equations (2 4) and (2 5). ( 2 4) ( 2 5)

PAGE 24

24 w here f (t) is the loss rate; I (t) is the storm rainfall int ensity; t is the time; and is the calibration constant, called the phi index. Transfer f unction The transformation of the flows generated from different parts of the watershed into a hydrograph at the outlet is referred to the process c alled Transfer function ( Hingray et al 2009). This contribution accounts for both overland flow and interflow (Bedient et al 2008). There are several methods to compute the hydrograph. 1. Rational m ethod : The Rational formula is o ne of the simplest formulas that comput e the prediction of peak flow. It is obtained as mentioned in the Equation (2 6) (Bedient et al 2008 ) Q p = CiA (cfs) (2 6) w here C is the runoff coef ficient. It var ies with land use, i is intensity of rainfall of chosen frequency for a duration equal to time of concentration t c (in. /hr.) t c is equilibrium time for rainfall occurring at the most remote portion of the watershed to con tribute flow at the outlet, A is catchment area (acres) As we can see the previous formula computes the peak flow It does not necessarily present the conversion of the excess flow into a hydrograph. 2 Time area m ethods : One of the interes ting ways to understand how rainfall excess is conver ted into hydrograph is the time area histogram. The assumption made in this method is that the outflow hydrograph results from pure translation of direct runoff to the outlet at uniform velocity, ignorin g any storage effects in the watershed. This method is given by the Equation (2 7) (Bedient et al 2008) (2 7 )

PAGE 25

25 where = hydrograph ordinate at time n (cfs) R i is excess rainfall ordinate at time i (ft/s) and A j is time area histogram ordinate at time j (ft 2 ) 3. Unit hydrograph m ethod : A unit hydrograph is defined as the hydrograph that results from 1 inch (or meter ) of e xcess precipitation (or r unoff) spre ad uniformly in space and time over a watershed for a given duration. Several assumptions inherent to the Unit Hydrograph Method tend to limit its application to any given watershed (Johnstone and Cross, 1949): 1. The duration of direct runoff is always the s ame for uniform intensity storms of the same duration, regardless of the intensity 2. The direct runoff volumes produced by two different excess rainfall distributions are in the same proportion as the excess rainfall volume 3. The time distribution of the direc t runoff is independent of concurrent runoff from antecedent storm events 4. Hydrologic systems are usually nonlinear due to factors such as storm origin and patterns and stream channel hydraulic properties 5. Despite this nonlinear behavior, the unit hydrograph concept is commonly used because, although it assumes linearity, it is a convenient tool to calculate hydrographs and it gives results within acceptable levels of accuracy 6. The alternative to UH theory is kinematic wave theory and distributed hydrologic mo dels 4. : The basin lag is given in the following Equation (2 8). (2 8) C t is a coefficient ranging from 1.8 to 2.2, L is the length of the basin outlet to the basin divide, Lc is the length along the main stream to a point nearest the basin centroid. T he Equation (2 9) expresses the peak discharge as followed (2 9)

PAGE 26

26 w here 640 will be 2.75 for metric system, C p is a storage coefficient ranging from 0.4 to 0.8 where larger values of C p are associated with smaller values of C t, A is the drainage area. The ti me base is given by the Equation (2 10). (2 10 ) However, for small watershed the time is obtained by multiplying tp by a valu e ranging from 3 t o 5 The duration is given by the E quation (2 11). (2 11 ) For other rainfall excess duration, the Equation (2 12) ex presses t he adjusted b asin lag as followed ( 2 12 ) The width expressed in the E quation s (2 13) and (2 14) respectively for 50% and 75 % of Q p are where 770 and 440 should be replaced wit h 2.14 and 1.22 when the metric unit system is used (2 13 ) (2 14) 5. SCS method : The hydrograph calculated in the Equation (2 15 ) is a triangle with a rainfall duration D, time of rise Tr, time fal l B and peak flow. The direct runoff is obtained as stated in the Equation (2 16 ).

PAGE 27

27 (2 15) (2 16 ) From the analysis o f historical streamflow data, B is usually e qual to 1.67 Tr. So the peak discharge is calculated as stated by the Equation (2 17) ( 2 1 7 ) Sensitivity A nalysis in Hydrological M odeling Sensiti vity a nalyses consist s of determining qualitative or quantitative variation induced in the model outputs by varying one or multiple inputs factor s of the model ( Saltelli et al., 2000). Hydrologic models that are mathematical or empirical descriptions of th e watershed response to rainfall are based on conceptualization, assumptions and hypotheses. Model inputs are subject to multiple sources of uncertainty including errors of measurements, spatial and temporal limitations, and poor or partial understanding o f the processes involved. Accordingly, the outputs of these models can also present imperfections that have been incorporated through hypothesis, structures, quantity and quality of input data, and parameter estimates (Gupta et al., 1999; Satelli et al., 2 000, Muletha and Nicklow, 2005). As a result, sensitivity a nalyses are conducted to determine: 1. The resemblance of the model to the system it represents 2. The factors that most influence the outputs and that particularly required stronger knowledge. 3. Parameter s that are insignificant 4. Region in space where the model variation is maximum

PAGE 28

28 5. The optimal regions within the space of input factors for use in a subsequent calibration study. 6. Factors that interact with others if there is any (Satelli et al., 2000) The sen sitivity analysis process involved following four particular steps that are: 1. Determination of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of input parameters 2. Generation of input samples 3. Model simulations to calculate desired outputs/ decision variables 4. Sta tistical analysis that generates sensitivity indices and parameter rankings (Sa l telli et al., 2000) Sensitivity Analysis M ethod Several methods of sensitivity analysis (SA) exist that have their own strengths and weakness es The choice can be difficult and depends on the problem under investigation, the characteristics of the model and the computational cost. The methods can be generally classified into t wo that are the local SA methods and the global methods Local SA (LSA) Local sensitivity analysis (LSA) that is usually carried out by computing partial derivatives is mostly concentrated on the local impact of the factors of the model. Local analysis addresses sensitivity relative to point estimates of parameter values. T he local derivative of the desired output variable is calculated around a certai n value of one input parameter while holding other input parameter s constant at their mean values It is less helpful when being used to compare the effect of various factors on the output. One At A Time (OAT) i s one of the experiment designs of the local s ensitivity analysis (LSA). S implest class of screening designs; it uses nominal or standard values per factor often obtained from the literature. Two extreme values are usually u sed for

PAGE 29

29 the range of likely valu es of each factor. The mean value of the factor which is usually calculated or found in the literature is midway between the two extremes. A comparison is then made between t he magnitudes of the differences between the outputs for the extreme inputs and th e mean or standard value to find the factors that impact the most the model results ( Satelli et al 2002 ) Daniel (1973) classified the OAT designs into five categories: 1. Standard OAT designs that vary one factor from the standard value 2. Strict OAT designs that one factor from the standard val ue of the preceding experiment 3. Paired OAT designs that produce two observations and hence one simple comparison at a time 4. Free OAT designs that make each new run under new conditions 5. Curved OAT designs that produce a su bset of results by varying only one easy to vary factor Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) Global sensitivity analysis is studies how the variation in the output of a model can be apportioned to different sources of variation quantitative ly or qualitative ly in the model in puts. Unlike LSA G lobal S ensitivity A nalysis methods e stimate the effect of a factor while all other factors are varied simultaneously. Thi s variation of the other factors accounts for interactions between variables without depending on the stipulation of a nominal point It describes the probability distribution function that covers the factors ranges of existence by examining sensitivity with regard to the entire factor distribution s Some of the global sensitivity analysis methods are the Morris Method which is a screening method the Fourier Analysis Sensitivity T est method and the Sobol method which are variance based methods

PAGE 30

30 1. The Morris Method : The Morris method (Morris, 1991) tends to determine which factors may have negligible linear and additive or non linear or interact with other factors The Morris experiment is composed of individually randomized one factor at a time experiments (Sa l telli et al 2004). The Morris method is considered as a global sensitivity method because it covers the entire space over which the factors can vary. Morris computes a number r of local measures at different points and averages these points. Morris is computationally more efficient than other methods of global sensitivity analysis since it req uires few simulations and can be interpreted easily (Sal telli et al 2005). The entire domains of the factors are randomly sampled to obtain f inite distribution s of elementary effects (Fi) High influence of the factors on the output results in high mean of the distribution, whereas high standard deviation reveals there is either interact ion with in factors or a non linear effect exists (Morris 1991; Saltelli et al., 2004). However, the Morris method cannot give a quantitative measure about the percentage of total output uncertainty caused by uncertainty of each parameter The number of simulations (N) to perform in the Morris is obtained by multiplying the sampling siz e for search trajectory ( r) to the number of factors (k) increased by one unit (r (k+1)) 2 Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test Method ( FAST ) : This method has been developed for the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis (Cukier et al., 1973, 1975, 1978). It allows the estimation of t he expected value and variance of the output variable and the contribution of the individual input factor to the variance ( Saltelli et al., 2000 ).

PAGE 31

3 1 The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test Method (FAST) presents two types of computations. The first one is the classical FAST that computes the first order indices which a re numbers indicating the primary effects of the factors The second one is the Extended FAST. It was proposed by Saltelli et al (1999b) and measures the total effect of the factors. It adds up the impacts of each factor and their interactions In Extende d FAST, (Saltelli et al 1999), the total effect is evaluated by search curve that scans the space of the input factors in such a way that each factor is explored with selected integer frequency. The simulation in the FAST is obtained at of cost M* k runs where M is a numb er between 500 and 1000 and k is the number of fa ctors. 3. : usually used to obtain quantitative measures on how the uncertainty in model outputs can be apportioned to uncertainty in individual input variables (Saltelli et al., 2000 ) The main approach is to decompose the function into summands of increasing dimensionality (Satelli et al 2000) The approach by which the mul tidimensional method uses a Monte Carlo integration procedure, FAST uses a pattern search based on a sinusoidal function. Sobol can provide all the orders of indices from first to total. The number of simulations ( N) to perform in the is obtained by multiplying M (a number between 500 and 1000) by the number of factors (k) Uncertainty A nalysis in Hydrological M odeling While the sensitivity anal ysis tries to determine the change in model output values that in duces by changes in model input values, the uncertainty analysis attempts to

PAGE 32

32 describe the entire set of possible outcomes. An uncertainty analysis consists in randomly choosing input values resulting from model simulation to obtain statistical measures of the distributions of the outputs. It is useful to determine range s of potential outputs of the system and probabilities associated with them. It also estimate s the probability that the output will exceed a target value. I n any uncertainty analysis some ass umptions are made. S tatistical distributions for the input values are considered to be correct and the model is assumed to good enough to describe the proces ses taking place in the system. Morgan and Henrion (1992), Haan (2002), and Shirmohammadi et al. (2 006) provide extensive review of uncertainty analysis methods applied to environmental models. First Order Approximation (FOA) (Morgan and Henrion, 1992) and the Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) are two methods for generating the general probability distribut ions of the output variables of interest, which is the best method to quantify model uncertainty (Haan 2002). In the first method, the expecte d value of the output is obtaine d based on the variance and covariance of the input parameters and their local abs olute sensitivity indices The second method is carried out by performing three different steps: first, a random sampling of the multivariate input distribution is perfo rmed; second the model simulations are run with the sampled values to produce e stimates of model output values; and finally a PDF is produced by combining these output values. The procedure requires lot of computati ons

PAGE 33

33 Figure 2 1 Hydrological response of a catchment (Musy, 2001)

PAGE 34

34 Figure 2 2. Land Use and Hydrological response. From Sauchyn (s. d.). Figure 2 3. Hydrol ogical response of a catchment (Musy, 2001)

PAGE 35

35 CHAPTER 3 WATERSHED PRESENTATION Watershed Location This study was carried out in one of the watersheds of the metropolitan a rea as presented in Figure 3 1 The River Grise basin is varied and complex basin for its geography and its l and use This basin presents an important interest and has been pointed out as one of the most vulnerable watersheds in the country. The inundation risk in this catchment is really important and has been aggravated by agricultural practices, land use and unplanned urbanization. The study area presents three more or less different defined zones: a rural zone lies in the upper part of the catchment; the middle part of the basin is an urban area; a nd the downstream area has both urban and sub urban areas which have been more and more densely populated for the last decades The region is represented by the River Grise basin. Located in the south eastern of Port au Prince, it is bordered to the south b y the summit of the Massif de la Selle, to th e west by the hills and Calabasse and Gelin, to the east by the hills Mare Rseau et Pays Pourri, and to the north by the hills Dumay and Chacha (Georges, 2008). The watershed straddles six municipalities as ind icated in Figure 3 2 which are, in the upper part Kenscoff and Croix des Bouquets; in the middle, the Petion Ville and Croix des Bouquets ; and in the lower part, Tabarre, Cite Soleil, the biggest shantytown in the country, Delmas and Croix des Bouquets. The catchment covers an area of 392 km 2 and is itself part of another wide r watershed, Cul de Sac

PAGE 36

36 Physical C haracteristics of the Watershed T he multiple interactions that have occurred in the watershed over time influence its hydrological behavior. O ccur r ing at the interface between the lithosphere and the atmosp here, these interactions can be geological, climatological and meteorological etc. Also they influence in many ways the geomorphologic factors, the soil characteristics and the vegetation particula rities and to some extent determining the hydrology of the catchment Hydrology and H ydrogeology Several streams and springs are encountered in the River Grise catchment. However m ost of them are perennial. The main river is the so called River Grise ( Fig ure 3 3 ) Its name is due to the nature of the pebbles found in its bed which are from arising basalt and limestone formations erode d in the upstream It presents an average flow of 3. 9 3 m 3 /s ( MARNDR/MOE 2000) With a wide bed and a low average flow, the River Grise is generally passable with light vehicles or on foot most of the time. However, in rainy seasons flooding of the River Grise is devastating for crops and surrounding habitat s Nevertheless t he regime of the River Grise has seriously evolved ov er time due to deforestation In dry periods, the flow decreases significantly while devastating floods are becoming more frequent in rainy seasons It is alimented by various ravines that drain the foothills of the Massif de La Selle. A network of ravines drain s rainwater from the southern part of the watershed. These ravines flow, for some, into the River Grise ( Figure 3 4 ) For the others on the contrary, the water is scattered in residential areas and roads due to lack of continuity in this natural syst em to the nearby river.

PAGE 37

37 The River Grise represents an important source of recharge for the aquifer of Cul de Sac which is the main source of fresh water for the metropolitan area. Groundwater is typically found in layers of sand and gravel with a thickness of 1 to 8 meters separated by layers of silt and clay (Knowles et al 1999 ) Climatology Depending on whether it is the lowland or the mountain, the climate of the Grise River catchment varies. In Port au Prince, the annual rainfall averages 1300 mm whil e it is around 946 mm in Croix des Bouquets. However, the climate is rather humid in the upstream part of the catch ment. Windward and mountainous, the annual rainfall varies from 1450 mm in Petion ville to 2000 mm in Kenscoff (Sergile, 1998; Holly, 1999) Two rainy seasons are observed over the year in the study region: the first goes from April to May and the second, from September to November. Both rainy seasons are followed by a dry season (Holly, 1999). Geomorphology and S oils The geology of the regio n reflects the history of the island (MacFadden, 1986) In general, f ive major types of soil can be observed in the vicinity of Port au Prince. From oldest to later, there are massi ve limestone of the Eocene, sandy a nd marl limestone of Miocene, Pliocene s equence, basalts and Quaternary deposits. However, two types of geological materials are more likely to be observed: The Eocene limestone which is mainly karst form s the mountains that limit the plain of Cul de Sac and constitutes 51 % of the geology of th e River Grise basin (Projet Interuniversitaire Cibl 200 8) Generally they are white with a content of calcium c arbonate that often exceeds 90% ( Figure 3 5 ); Basalts (volcanic) roc ks which count for 35% and the deposit materials for the remaining (AgroCon sult, 2009).

PAGE 38

38 A lternating beds of gray marl and limestone give the formation of the Grise River The thickness of the formation is variable but is estimated to several hundred meters in average ( P rojet I nteruniversitaire Cibl 200 8) This catchment rather presents a mountainous configuration. In the upstream, the altitude varies from 200 m to 2250 m with very steep slope as up to 60%. According to CNICS, 60% of the area has a slope higher than 35% while less than 20% has a slope between 0 % and 12 % as ind icated in the Table 3 1 Soils in the River Grise basin are a mosaic on the historical geology of the bedrock and terrain originated from basalt, limestone and alluvium ( Georges, 2008) The Harmonized World Soil Database ( HWSD ) which is the soil database o f the FAO presents the properties of the soils encountered within the wate rshed. Cambisol is predominant with a predominant texture of clay loam both in the t opsoil and the subsoil The depth of the soil is an approximate of 1.25m Richard et al (2004), L alonde et al (1977) and HWSD found approximately the same classes of soil ranked in the T able 3 2. Vegetation and Land U se The vegetation varies with the difference existing in the topography of the basin from mountain to lowland ecosystems as indicated i n the Figure 3 6 The flora is very diverse: Pine forest, hardwood forest, dry forests, humid forest of lowland etc. ( S wartley et al. 20 06 ). This watershed had presented one of the most interesting vegetation of the Caribbean region in terms of botany (Ek man 1926, Judd 1987, Holdridge 1947). Agriculture remains the main use of the land of the Grise River catchment. About 42 % of the land is allocated to agriculture which c an be observed almost everywhere

PAGE 39

39 on the catchment. Savannah zones and pastures occupy respective ly about 30 % and 15 % of the catchment. More or less dense forests account for 8 %. Table 3 1. Slope classification in the watershed Class (%) Area km2 Percentage o f the catchment 0 12 75.78 19.29 12 25 50.55 12.86 25 35 26.25 6.68 > 35 240.35 61.17 Total 392.93 100.00 Source: CNIGS

PAGE 40

40 Tab l e 3 2. Soil properties in the catchment based on ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) Depth (cm) Texture class Total po rosity (cm3/cm3) Residual water content Effective porosity e (cm3/cm3) Bubbling pressure Pore size distribution Water etained at 33 kPa (cm3/cm3) Water retained at 1500 kPa (cm3/cm3) Geometric mean (cm) Arithmetic mean(cm) 0 28 clay 0.475 0.048 0.09 0.075 0.385 0.116 37.3 22.51 0.165 0.128 0.396 0.07 0.272 0.064 28 64 Clay loam 0.464 0.055 0.075 0.051 0.39 0.111 25.89 20.09 0.242 0.192 0.318 0.068 0.197 0.082 64 125 Sandy clay loam 0.398 0.066 0.068 0.067 0.33 0.095 28.08 29.87 0.319 0.24 0.255 0.069 0.148 0.063

PAGE 41

41 Table 3 3. Satur ated Hydraulic Conductivity classified by USDA Soil Texture (Rawls, 1998 USDA Soil Class Texture Saturated Hydraulic conductivity 1 ( k0 ) (in/hr) Range saturate Hydraulic Conductivity 2 ( k0 ) (in/hr) Sand 5.3 10.3 3.6 Fine Sand 4.8 8.7 4.2 Loamy San d 2.6 5.6 1.4 Loamy sand Fine 2.3 4.8 1.4 Sandy Loam 0.9 2.7 0.4 Fine loam Sandy 0.5 1.1 0.2 Loam 0.2 0.8 0.11 Silt Loam 0.3 0.9 0.14 Sandy Loam Clay 0.14 0.6 0.04 Clay Loam 0.05 0.28 0.01 Silty clay Loam 0.17 0.5 0.09 Sandy Cl ay 0.04 0.12 0.01 Silty clay Clay 0.06 0.28 0.02 Clay 0.07 0.027 0.03 1 Geometric mean value from k0 database 2 25% and 75% percentile values from k0 database

PAGE 42

42 Figure 3 1. Grise River catchment location

PAGE 43

43 Figure 3 2. Towns overlapped by the catchment

PAGE 44

44 Figure 3 3 Grise River in dry season view

PAGE 45

45 Figure 3 4. Hydr o graphic network

PAGE 46

46 Figure 3 5. River Grise left bank

PAGE 47

47 Figure 3 6. Grise River catchment land use

PAGE 48

48 CHAPTER 4 MODEL PRESENTATION Model S cope First d eveloped in 1979 by Beven and Ki r k by, TOPMODEL is a semi distributed model in which the predominant factors affecting the watershed response to precipitation are derived from the topography of the catchment and the soil transmissivity. The topography influences many aspects of the hydrologic system. It defines the movement of water in the w atershed under the effect of gravity (Wolock and Price, 1994). Divided into grid cells, the topography of the catchment is represented by means of a topographic soil index 0 square per unit length of contour; T 0 is the transmissivity of the soil gradient of ground surface When the spatial var iability of the soil transmissivity is neglected, the index becomes the spatial distribution of the soil moisture, surface saturation and runoff generation process (Zang and Montgomery, 1994). It assigns the same index to every point hydrologically similar. It is computed using topographic data such as DEM (Data Elevation Model). TOPMODEL allows at most thirty (30) discrete increments of the index. The transmissivity is computed as function of a saturated hydraulic conductivity which decreases exponentially with the depth. The surface runoff computation in TOPMODEL includes both saturation excess and i nfiltration excess runoff ( Montesinos Barrios and Beven 2004 ) using th e variable source area concept of stream flow based on the topographic Index.

PAGE 49

49 TOPMODEL is also considered as a physically based model (Beven and Kirby, 1979, Beven et al., 1984). Its parameters can be derived based on physical laws. Some parameters can al so be measured in situ Basic TOPMODEL Equations T otal flow computed by TOPMODEL i n the contributing area concept is measured as the sum of the saturation overland flow and the subsurface flow. It is expressed in the Equation (4 1). q total =q overland + q su bsurface ( 4 1) Where q total [L/T] is the total flow per unit area, q overland [L/T] is the saturation overland flow p er unit area, q subsurface [L/T] the subsurface flow per unit area S aturation overland flow is estimated as the sum of direct rainfall on the saturated areas and return flow as d efined by the Equation ( 4 2) q overland = q direct + q return ( 4 2) Where q direct [L/T] is direct precipitation on saturated areas, and q return is return flow. In TOPMODEL the volume of wate r entering the soil is equivalent to the quantity of water leaving this particular column of soil (steady state conditions). Also, it is assumed that the water table is recharged at a spatially uniform rate (R). The model derives expressions to compute the flows at some location x Law and the continuity E quation ( 4 3) : A x R = T x x C x ( 4 3) where tan x is the hydraulic gradient at x, A x [L 2 ] is the area upslope from x that drains past the location, T x [L2/T] is the transmissivity of the saturated thickness at the location x, and C x [L] is the contour width at x traversed by subsu rface flow.

PAGE 50

50 Beven an d Kirkby (1979) assume that soil transmissivity at the saturated thickness x is a function of the hydraulic conductivity, which decreases exponentially with depth. T he soil surface is generally permeable because aggregation s create flow pathways. Mathematically, the diminution of the transmissivity with depth is written as in the Equation (4.4). ( 4 4) Where z wt is the depth to the water table and the hydraulic c onductivity at the soil surface and f is the decay parameter for the decrease of hydraulic conductivity with depth. By substituting T x in e quation ( 4 3) and dividing by C x z wt is integrated to obta ining the average depth to the water table as expressed in the Equation (4 5). ( 4 5) Then a x and T 0 are respectively obtained in the Equations (4 6), (4 7) and (4 8) ( 4 6) ( 4 7) ( 4 8) TOPMODEL equations can be usuall y expressed in terms of saturation deficit (S) which is the product of the depth to the water table and readily drained soil porosity ( ). By multiplying the E quation ( 4 5) by we obtain the Equation (4 9) : ( 4 9) And m is obtained in the Equation (4 10)

PAGE 51

51 ( 4 10) Equation 4 9 states that the saturation deficit at any location x is determined by the watershed average saturation deficit (S) and the difference between the mean of the and the value of The location x in the watershed where S x is considered as saturated and can generate saturation overland flow; any location where S x < 0 produces return flow. The value of q direct is obtained by addi ng the products of the saturated areas a x by the precipitation intensity, i, and dividing by the watershed area, A, as presented in the Equation (4 11). ( 4 11) Where S x The value of q return is computed by summing the products of the saturated areas and the absolute value of the ir saturation deficits which are negative, divided by the total area as indicated in the Equation (4 12) : ( 4 12) Where S x < 0 Subsurface flow, q subsurface subsurface flux ( q x ), (the right hand side of equation 4 3 divided by C x ) with equation 4 4, the expression for transmissivity of the saturated thickness, along the derived values of z wt and m to obtain the Equation (4 13) : ( 4 13)

PAGE 52

52 By integrating the pre vious equation along the length o f all stream channels we obtain the Equation (4 14). ( 4 14) Assumptions The structure of the TOPMODEL is underpinned by some basic assumptions: Steady state is assumed to estimate the dynamics of the saturated zone 1. The hydraulic gradient of the saturated zone can be estimated by the local parallel to the local surface slope. 2. The transmissivity decreases with depth as an exponential function of storage deficit or depth to the water table. 3. Hydraulic similarity is assigned to the grid cells with the same topographic index. Differences of TOPMODEL ersions Initiated by Professor Mike Kirkby at the School of Geography at the University of Leeds in 1974, TOPMODEL has been varied in different versions with varying levels of complexity. Some versions of TOPMODEL compute snowmelt and snow accumulation (Wolock and others, 1989) whereas others do not (Wood and others, 1988). All the different versions of TOPMODEL do not i nclude all the concepts of streamflow generation. For example, while some computes both infiltration excess overland flow and the variable source area of streamflow generation (Wolock, 1993) evapotran spiration estimation can vary from one version to anoth er Evapotranspiration is estimated in some versions based on empirical computations whereas others use physical ly based methods to compute evapotranspiration (Famiglietti, 1992 )

PAGE 53

53 It is also noticeable that the level of spatial complexity and aggregation o f the input and processes simulation differ from among the versions of TOPMODEL Model Applicability TOPMODEL was first generated for the simulation of humid catchment s in the U nited K ingdom (Beven and Kirkby, 1979; Beven et al., 1984, Quinn and Beven, 199 3), in the eastern part of the U nited S tates of A merica (Beven and Wood, 1983, Homberger et al., 1985) and Scotland (Robson et al 1993). The model has performed well for flow rates simulations and spatially distribution of saturations. However, for the l ast decades several attempts have been made to simulate the hydrological responses of catchments located under more or less dry conditions. TOPMODEL was successfully applied to forecast flood in various Southern France catchments according to Durand et al. (1992), Sempere Torres (1990) and Wedling (1992). TOPMODEL has also given good results for its applications to some Spani sh basins (Piol et al., 1997). However, according to Seibert et al (1997), TOPMODEL is not capable of producing the correct dynamic s for groundwater, and consequently its ability to simulate runoff in shallow watersheds is reduced. In fact, the assumptions of spatial uniform recharge and steady flow rates are too simple. Measurements in different catchments showed that groundwater res ponses to storms can present wide spatial variations Model Inputs D ischarge and spatial soil water saturation pattern are simulated in TOPMODEL based on hydrological data time series and topographic information. The R implementation of TOPMODEL which is u sed in this study requires observed rainfall potential evapotranspiration and the catchment topographic index map ( Buytaert et al

PAGE 54

54 2005 ) The Topographic Index is generated from the Data Elevation Model (DEM) using such tools as GIS or oth er specific prog rams released with TOPMODEL However, in order to calibrate the simulation TOPMODEL observed discharge is also needed. TOPMODEL Parameters The quantity of parameters required to run TOPMODEL depends on the version of the model that is being used. All of t he TOPMODEL versions use at least five parameters Some versions however have up to twelve parameters. The following are the parameters usually used in TOPMODEL and also the ones that are used in the R implementation: 1. m : Also named scaling parameter, it co ntrols the decrease of transmissivity with depth and the shape of the hydrograph recession. Kinner and Stallard ( 1999) observed that 63%of the transmissivity is within 1 m and 86 % is within 2m. It has a length unit [L] 2. Sr M ax : is the maximum moisture def icit in the root zone. It physically occur s when the canopy is dry and the soil is the wilti ng point. It has a length unit [L] 3. td: Unsaturated zone time delay per unit storage deficit. When water is added to the root zone, the deficit decreases until zero, and then water is added to the unsaturated zone becoming unsaturated zone storage. It has a length unit [ T/ L] 4. Sr: initial root zone deficit. When it is null evapotranspiration occurs at potential rates It has a length unit [L] 5. LnTe : is the natural loga rithm of the effective transmissivity of the soil. Its unit is [ L 2 / T ]. 6. vch : channel flow outside the catchment [m/h]

PAGE 55

55 7. ks : Surface hydraulic conductivity [m/h] Surface hydraulic conductivity ( K0 ) [L] is an important parameter of TOPMODEL. It describes the rate at which water can move through a porous medium under a hydraulic gradient. It is a function of both the medium and the fluid properties. It reaches its maximum when the soil is saturated and decreases with decreasing water content or when the tension of the water increases 8. CD: capillary drive, see Morel Seytoux and Khanji (1974) [m] 9. vr : channel flow inside catchment [m/h] 10. dt : The time step [hours] 11. q s 0: is the Initial subsurface flow Some parameters of TOPMODEL 0 an be derived from the DEM of the watershed. However, for most of the parameters it is always difficult to determine precisely their value. C alibration techniques are necessary to adequately quantify the parameters. Beven ( 1997) has pr esented a review of the values t hat were used in TOPMODEL simulation. TOPMODEL Parameters S ensitivity Although initially designed to simulate the hydrological responses of catchments in humid areas based on the variable contributing area concept, TOPMODEL has been frequently modified to enlarge its application range (Pilar and Bev en 2004).Thus, many versions of TOPMODEL have been used to simulate hydrological watershed responses. Also, t he Sensitivity analysis of the TOPMODEL parameters has been studied in many studies and f or many versions of the model.

PAGE 56

56 Fedak (1999 ) used the Windows 97 version of TOPMODEL which contains only five (5) parameters to simulate the hydrological behavior the Back Creek subwatershed of the Upper Roanoke River Watershed in southwest Virginia which i s an urbanizing watershed currently dominated by forest and pasture. He found that by increasing the grid cell size from 15 to 120 meters, the watershed mean of the topographic index increases. However, hydrographs generated by TOPMODEL were not affected b y this increase in the topographic index. The sensitivity analysis of the parameters reveals that the parameters that had the greatest effect on hydrographs generate d by TOPMODEL were the m and lnTe parameters Parameters such as the unsaturated zone time delay per unit storage deficit (td) and channel velocity are not sensitive Campling et al (2002) used TOPMODEL to simulate the River Ebonyi headwater catchment (379 km2) which is humid catchment and is located on the western border of the Cross River Plai ns. He found that t he most sensitive parameter was the m parameter. The transmissivity decay parameter (m) supports the observation that subsurface flow and local storage deficits are important contributors to the hydrolog ical response of the catchment ( Ca mpling et al 2002). Arnbikadevi (2004) used TOPMODEL in Stillwater watershed and the model was sensitive towards the scaling parameter that controls the decrease of transmissivity with depth (m), the maximum moisture deficit in the root zone ( Sr max ), the unsaturated zone time delay per unit storage deficit (td), the natural logarithm of the effective transmissivity of the soil (lnTe) Nourani et al (2011) found that t he sensitivity analysis indicate s that m and ln T e parameters, which refer to the soil mo isture condition, have the most effect on the result s of rainfall runoff simulation in the Ammameh w atershed

PAGE 57

57 The study was conducted at different time scales using different terrain algorithms The channel velocity was also sensitive in some extent. In su m the parameters m, lnTe, td Sr MAX and Sr0, vr are the ones that have been usually found sensitive in watershed simulation were TOPMODEL has been used. Topographic Index Topography is usually considered as one of the most important factors that control t he areal distribution of saturation in the soils, which in turn constitutes a key to understanding much of the var iability in soils and the hydrological processes T he topographic index (T I) which is derived from the DEM has become a widely used tool to de scribe wetness co nditions at the catchment scale Grabs et al (2009), Beven. (1979). The Topographic index represents the propensity of any point of the catchment to becom e saturated and to act as a source area that contributes surface runoff to the outlet All points with the same value of the index are assumed to respond in a hydrologically similar way. High index values will tend to saturate first and will therefore indicate potential subsurface or surface contributing areas. High values of the topograph ic index are observed on shallow slopes. These locations represent high contributing areas. According to Trevor et al (2005), low values occur on steep slopes resulting in small contribution of these areas in the in Runoff at the outlet. The Figure 4 1 sh ows a good relation between the topography, the topographic index and the soil moisture. Output of TOPMODEL The main output generated in TOPMODEL is the streamflow. However, any hydrolog ical process can be simulated. Also, each version can present the outp ut in a different way. The easiest version s are interface interactive.

PAGE 58

58 T he R implementation of TOPMODEL does not contain all these previous options. However, it can be coupled with GLUE which a statistical method for quantifying the uncertainty of the mode l predictions Figure 4 1. The relation between topography, topographic index ad soil moisture deficit

PAGE 59

59 CHAPTER 5 METHODOLOGY Sensitivity Analysis L imitations that related to model structures, data availability on parameter values, initia l and boundary c onditions will make hydrologic model application difficult. Uncertainties that have entered the model can subst antially influence the output. There is always need to adjust model parameters for a better fit by calibration. However, the para meter calibration process would be more efficient if it was concentrated on the parameters that most influence the outputs of the model simulation. Also, measured dataset is required to perform the calibration process (Wallach et al 2006 ; Beven 2008). In this study, a Local sensitivity analysis ( OAT Method) and two global se nsitivity analyse s (Morris Method and Fourier A mplitude Sensitivity Test Method) were performed to understand the parameters that most influence the output of the model. Sensitivity A nalysis Process There is a four step general procedure for performing global sensitivity analysis that are the determination of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of input parameters, the generation of input samples, the computation of the computati on of the model output for each scenario and the analysis of the output distribution (Wallach et al., 2006) Determination of Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) of Input P arameters TOPMODEL uses several parameters that reflect the hydrology, soils, a nd location of the catchment under investigation. Although TOPMODEL is a physically based model, only 0

PAGE 60

60 from available information from the watershed characteristics. Even in the best experimental conditions, it is always difficult to determine precisely all the required data. Since natural systems such as soils are not homogeneous, and due to lack of measurement, it is difficult to assign specific values to some parameters which spatia lly vary in the catchment (Montesinos Barrios and Beven, 2004; Wolock, 1993) R TOPMODEL is an implementation of TOPMODEL. It is based on the 1995 FORTRAN version by Keith Beven ( Buytaert, 2011). Eleven parameters that are s urface h ydraulic conductivity ( k s ), the areal average of t ransmissivity ( l nTe ) scaling parameter ( m ), c apillary d rive (CD), initial subsurface flow (qs0), initial root zone deficit (Sr0), m aximum root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ), unsaturated zone time delay (td), channel flow inside the catchment (vr) and channel flow outside the catchment (vch) are used the R TOPMODEL. The selection of hydraulic conductivity technique is based on the level of information available on physical and hydraulic properties of the soi l (Maidment, 1993). Using the soils parameters from the USDA classification, the saturated hydraulic conductivity was calculated by the generalized Kozeny Carman equation expressed in the Equation (5 1). (5 1) Where e is the effective porosity, n is set e qual to 4 and B equals 1058; k s has units of cm/hr. Calculated values obtained for the first layer (clay layer) using the Equation (5 1) were considered as the values of the surface h ydraulic conductivity It presen ts a uniform distribution between a minimum and a maximum values The distribution of the

PAGE 61

61 k s was expected to be lognormal. However there is no evide nce that can support lognormal distribution in the Kozeny Carman equation (Appendix D ) The parameter l nTe [ L 2 /T] is the log of the areal average of T 0 The transmissivity represents the integral over soil de pth of hydraulic conductivity. The transmissiv ity is obtained by the E quation (5 2). (5 2) Where k is the hydraulic conductivity, f is the scaling parameter that controls the decrease of the hydraulic conductivity with dep th and z is the thickness of each layer. The parameter f is obtained by plotting the hydraulic cond u ctivity of ea ch layer Three values of hydraulic conductivity were obtained for each layer of the soil: a lower value, an average value and an upper value. As indicated in Figure 5 1 three curves of variation of the hydraulic conductivity were plotted F rom these plot s result three values for the f parameter The exponential factor governing the decrease of the hydraulic conductivity is the f parameter. The parameter l nTe is then obtained by taking the areal average of natural logarithm of T 0 which is th e sum of the transmissivity of the layer s No particular trend of distribution was found for T 0 A maximum value and a minimum value were calculated for the parameter. A uniform distributi on was also assum ed for l nTe The parameter m [L] is the model param eter that controls the rate of decline of curves for the catchment when the assumption that the flow is derived from subsurface drainage is made. It is usually de rived from a pure recession in which recharge is

PAGE 62

62 considered negligible. Thus, discharge has an inverse or first order hyperbolic relationship to time. (Beven, 2001) In this study, the scaling parameter could not be derived from recession curve. L ong term recession was not observed for the river discharge provided by the Early Warning Project dataset. Pure recession in which recharge can be considered being negligible shows that the flow presents an inverse or first order hyperbolic relationship to time as expressed in the Equation (5 3) (Beven, 2001). (5 3) The plot of 1/Q b should be as a straight line with slope 1/m as shown in Figure 5 2 For t he Grise River basin, even weekly recessions were difficult to be found. Few recession curves resulting from the Early Warning Project dataset seem to provide unrealistic values for the parameter m. From previous study (Beven et al 1997) m canno t obvious ly be extremely high as determined in the Figure 5 3 and Figure 5 3. According to David (1993) the parameter m is calculated from the Equation ( 4 10 ) Likewise as a function of a normal distribution was found for the parameter m Equation (5 4 ). (5 4 ) wher e z i i are the thickness and the porosity of their respective layers. Sr Max [L] is computed as: (5 5 )

PAGE 63

63 Where z root is the root zone depth, fc is the field capacity and is the wilting point of the so il. The T able 3 2 presents the f ield capacity and wilting point based on the ASCE classification ( Rawls et al 1983 ). Sr Max for the entire soil was calculated by the Equation 5 6 based on the char acteristics of the soil in the T able 3 3. ( 5 6 ) is the difference between fc and Sr Max presents a normal distribu tion as a 1993). The parameter Sr0 [L] is ini tial root zone storage deficit. When the gravity drainage layer is exhausted, soil moisture will sti ll evaporate with the rate of Ep as indicat ed in the Equation 5 7 The rate of evapotranspiration loss E is assumed be proportional to a (5 7) The ini tial root zone stora ge deficit varies in a certain range of Sr Max In this study Sr0 was kept constant. It has been demonstrated that likewise qs0, Sr0 influences the flow process only in the beginning of model simulation For a long simulation over 5 ep, its influence will be insignificant. CD [L] is the capillary drive. It is a function of the capillary suction which is the combined adhesive forces that join the water molecules and the solid particles Morel Seytoux and Khanji (1974) (Bedient et al and 2008 ) The capillary drive is found in the Green Ampt infiltration method and is referred to as expressed in the Equation (5 8 ). (5 8 )

PAGE 64

64 b size distribution index (Parlange et al 1982). According to Rawls et al (1983) b provided the arithmetic and geometric mean values with the corresponding standard devi ations for both parameters, for different texture class Rawls et al (1983) Hantush and Khalin (2003) used the KINEROS2 which is event and physica lly based runoff and erosion model to calculate the arithm etic me ans and standard deviations of capillary drive for different soil textures by performing Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The T able 5 1 presents the arithmetic mean and standard deviations of the Capillary Drive for different soil textures obtained fro m the lognormal approximation and by performing 10000 Monte Carlo simulations, using the statistics of the lognormally b 1982). Based on the T able 5 1 provided by Hantush and Khalin for different classes of soil t he combi ned capillary drive for the entire soil was calculated as stated in the E quation 5 9 (5 9 ) Where z i and CD i are the thickness and the capillary drive of their re spectiv e layers. The channel velocity is also one of th e most important parameter of R TOPMODEL ( Parsons et al 2004 ) In this study, vr [L/T] was calculated using the Manning equation. Water level data (Stage) generated by the Early Warming Project that has ins talled some instrum ents on the watershed was used.

PAGE 65

65 Based on the information provided by Figure 5 5 and Figure 5 6 a rectangular sh ape was adopted for the channel (Figure 5 7 ), where b is the bed width and y is the stage at the measurement time T he water level gauge is installed on the bridge which has vertical abutments made of masonry. The Manning coefficient for natural bed is estimated within the range 0.030 0.0 3 5 by Chow ( 1959). T he location of the water level gauge was found within a range of s lope of 0.8% to 1.0 8 % by processing the DEM in ARCGIS and the width of the bed (b) is estimated using Google Earth at 45 m. Calculated for different values of the ranges, the v elocities were then obtained as indicated in the Manning E quation as stated in the E quation (5 10 ) (5 10 ) Where n is the Manning coefficient, R [L] the hydraulic radius and S is the slope of the bed. The velocities were plotted. A normal dis tributi on was obtained for the velocity since the histogram has revealed a very normal distribution for the parameter with ske wness null as showed in the Figure 5 8 The mean is 7651.56 m/h with a standard deviation of 719.44. The parameter qs0 [L] is init ial subsurface flow per unit area. It is usually assumed as the first measured flow. The minimum water level measured around the bridge of Croix des Missions from August 2011 to June 2012 was 0.27m and was considered as qs0. The parameter td is the unsatur ated zone time delay per unit st orage deficit It controls the rate that recharge is added to the saturated zone per unit saturation deficit.

PAGE 66

66 The parameter can be calculated as the quotient of the soil depth and the hydraulic conductivity ( Ambikadevi 2004 ) as expressed in the Equation (5 11 ) (5 11 ) where z i and k i are the thickness and the hydraulic conductivit y of their respective layers, w ith i varying from 1 to 3 The parameter dt is the time step. It corresponds to the increment in time of the data series. The time step is 3 hours sin c e rainfall and potential evapotranspiration data were available t this time step. Generation of I nput F actor S amples The loca l sensitivity analysis (OAT) was performed for 10, 20, 50, 100 150 of initial values of the parameters as presented in the T able 5 3. In some cases the range was infeasible or unrealistic. In the GSA, b ased on PDFs and the choice of SA method, the num ber of samples plays an important role. R TOPMODEL requires eleven parameters to perform. However, all of them are not equally important for the model output. In study, some parameters such as Initial subsurface flow per unit area ( qs0), the channel flow o utside the catc hment (vch), the time step (dt) the unsaturated root zone deficit (Sr0) were kept unchan ged as indicated in the Table 5 1. Simlab generated automatically the sampling of the param eters that were chosen for the s ensitivity analysis Two met hods which are the Morris method and the extended FAST (Fourier Analysis Sensitivity Test) method were selected to conduct the sensitivity analysis (SA). Parameters were chosen to be uniformly, normally or lognormally distributed based on the literature or the calculation processes.

PAGE 67

67 The Morris Method is well known as a screening method for environmental models It is an easy method that requires few simulations with easily interpretable results (Saltelli et al ., 2005). The number of simulations (N) to perfo rm in the Morris analysis results as indicated in the Equation (5.12). N = r (k + 1) (5 12 ) where r is the sampling siz e for search trajectory (r = 10 produces satisfactory results), and k is the number of factors. The extended FAST method uses the replicated Latin hypercube sampling to randomly sample the k dimensional space of the input parameters(r LHS) design (McKay et al., 1979; McKay 1995). The number of simulations required in this analysis is expressed in the Equation (5.13 ). N=M*k (5 13 ) where m is a number between 500 and 1000. In this study M was chosen as 1000 Computation of the Model Output for Each S cenario Once the samples have been generated, the corresponding model output values were computed. Codes written in R presented in the Appendix A and appendix B were used t o simulate the outputs. Since TOPMODEL is quite simple, the running process is not really intensive. A few minutes were enough for the simulation. The ouput values generated from this process were formatted for the analysis in Simlab wich was used for the global sensitivity analysis.

PAGE 68

68 Analysis of the Output D istribution For the OAT method, the analyses were carried out for specif ic values suc h as m inimum, median, maximum and total streamflow A slope was constructed between for the variation of the values. The bigger slope indicates the greater change. For the Global Sensitivity analyses, o utput s obtained from the model runs w ere stored in the desired SimL ab post processing format to run the statistical analysis that generates sensitivity indices and paramet er ranki ngs. SimL ab analyzed the data and calculate sensitivity indexes of the Morris and the extended FAST methods. In the Morris Method, the characterization the distribution of F i through its mean and standard deviation ( ) presents meaningful information about the of i th factor on the output. A factor with a high mean presents a significant overall influence on the output; a high standard deviation indicates either a factor interacting with other factors or factor whose effect is nonlinear ( Sa l telli, et al 2004) In the FAST Method, the expected value and the variance of the output are estimated. The contribut ion of individual factor to the variance of the output is also estimated (Cukier et al. 1973) Two types of indices are generated: the first order indices (Classical FAST) which measure the main effect of factors. The second one s are the Total Sensitivity I ndices (TSI) in the Extend ed FAST. The TSI of a parameter is the sum of all the sensi tivity indices involving this parameter. They c ompute the total effect of the factors. The extended Fast analysis adds up the impacts of each factor and their interactions with other factors. Usually, When the TSI is greater than 0.8 the parameter is consi dered as very important; between 0.5 and 0.8 it is said to be important; when it is between 0.5 and 0.3 the parameter is not important; below 0.3 the parameter is said to be irrelevant (Sobol et al 199 0a, 1990b, 199 3 Chan et al 1997 )

PAGE 69

69 Excel was used t o construct the output probability distributions such as Cumulative Distribution Frequency (CDF) and histograms. Data Elevation Model (DEM) The DEM is one of the most important data used by TOPMDEL. The DEM used in this study was obtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM). Land surfaces between 83N and 83S are encompassed by the ASTER GDEM. It is composed of 22,600 1 by 1 tiles. Tiles that contain at least 0.01% land are a are included. The ASTER GDEM is in GeoTIFF format with geographic latitude and longitude coordinates and a 1 arc second (30 m) grid of elevation postings. It is referenced to the WGS84/EGM96 geoid. Estimated accuracies for this global product were 20 met ers at 95 % confidence for vertical data and 30 meters at 95 % confidence for horizontal data before the production. Topographic Index The obtained DEM was processed using ArcGIS 10 (Arc Map 10) to delineate the Grise River watershed. After the extraction of the watershed using watershed delineation tools available in the (Arc Map 10), the output raster format is transformed into a text file format (ASCII) which can be used by the R TOPMODEL version. Pixels outside the catchment area are given a distinct va lue that is set to NA in R. The 9999 value was set as the NA. The DEM was imported as a matrix which can then be processed by the topidx () function in R TOPMODEL to obtain the Topographic index required by TOPMODEL.

PAGE 70

70 Data Data used to conduct the researc h was downloaded from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) model. The NARR model is produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and takes in, or assimilates a great amount of observational data to produce a long term pictu re of weather over North America. A M atlab code (see Appendix A) was written to download 3 hrs precipitation and potential evapotranspiration over 1998 to 2002. However, in comparison to monthly and annual totals available in the literature, NARR has over estimated the rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. To correct the data, monthly values are calculated for the NARR dataset. The dataset was compared to FAO monthly data. NARR data was also twice the average available in the literature. A factor of c orrection was calculated and applied to the NARR dataset. This factor was 0.55. Soil information in this study is provided by Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) which is an initiative of Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) to combine recently collected data of soil information with the information already contained within the FAO UNESCO Digital Soil Map of the World. Model R un The version of TOPMODEL used to perform the hydrological simulation of the River Grise basin is the 97 version built in R. This implementation of T OPMODEL was performed by Buytaert et al ., (2005) C odes written in R (see appendix A and B ) provided in this package were modified to perform the processes encompassed in this

PAGE 71

71 research. For the global sensitivity analysis, sampling are generated as stated before using SimLab Table 5 1. Summary statistics of CD (cm) parameter for various soil types Soil texture Arithmetic G eometric M ean S td MC t heo MC t heo MC M ean S td Sand 39 40 118 156 9.9 5.3 Loamy sand 41 44 131 156 12.3 4.8 Sandy Loam 64 62 186 153 22.1 4.3 Loam 105 112 475 493 17.9 6.9 Silt loam 158 156 563 544 33.5 5.8 Sandy clay loam 181 1 80 864 800 44. 1 5 Clay loam 129 129 364 309 42.3 4.5 Silty clay loam 195 183 601 561 55 4.9 Sandy clay 219 224 909 937 48.6 5.9 Silty clay 209 204 666 583 59 4.9 Clay 242 232 770 689 64.1 5 From: Moha med M. Hantush and Latif Kalin (2003 ) Std: standar d deviation theo: theorical MC: Monte Carlo

PAGE 72

72 Table 5 2 TOPMODEL para meters and their values for GSA Min: Minimum value Max: Maximum value Stdev: Standard deviation This parameter is not really used in TOPMODEL Parameters values for Simulation and Global sensitivity analysis Parameters Min Initial / mean Max Stdev Distribution qs0 : Initial subsurface flow pe r unit area [m] 0. 2 7 constant LnTe :log of the areal average of T0 [m2/h] 1.85 0.61 0.35 uniform m : Model parameter [m] 0.450 0.13 normal Sr0 : Initial root zone storage deficit [m] 0.01 Constant Sr M ax : Maximum root zone storage deficit [m ] .449 0.13 normal t d : Unsaturated zone time delay per unit storage deficit [h/m] 0.43 3 4.80 uniform vch : channel flow outside the catchment [m/h] 4500 constant vr : channel flow inside catchment [m/h] 7651.56 719.44 normal k0 : Surface hydr aulic conductivity [m/h] 0.055 0.667 uniform CD : capillary drive, see Morel Seytoux and Khanji (1974) [m] 0.48 0.048 lognormal dt : The time step [hours] 3 Constant

PAGE 73

73 Table 5 3 TOPMODEL parameters and their values for LSA Parameters values for Simulation and Local sensitivity analysis Parameters 300% 200% 100% 50% 20% 10% Initial 10% 20% 50% 100% 200% 300% qs0 [m] 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 LnTe [m2/h] 1.22 0.61 0 0.305 0.488 0.549 0.61 0.671 0.732 0.915 1.22 1.83 2.44 m [m] 0.225 0.36 0.405 0.45 0.495 0.54 0.675 0.9 1.35 1.8 Sr0 [m] 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 SrMax [m] 0 0.2245 0.3592 0.4041 0.449 0.4939 0.5388 0.6735 0.898 1.347 1.796 td [h/m] 0 1.5 2.4 2.7 3 3.3 3.6 4.5 6 9 12 vch [m/h] 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 4500 vr [m/h] 3825.8 6121.2 6886.4 7651.6 8416.7 9181.9 11477 15303 22955 30606 k0 [m/h] 0 0.25 0.4 0.45 0.5 0.55 0.6 0.75 1 1.5 2 CD[m] 0 0.24 0.384 0.432 0.48 0.528 0.576 0.72 0.96 1.44 1.92 dt [h] 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 c or unfeasible values

PAGE 74

74 Figure 5 1 Decrease of the hydraulic c onductivity with average depth

PAGE 75

75 Figure 5 2. Derivation of an estimate of parameter m using recession curve analysis under exponential transmissivity profile assumption (Beven, 2001 ) Fig ure 5 3 Recession curve for the third week of December 20 11

PAGE 76

76 Figure 5 4. Recession curve for the first two wee k s of January, 20 12 Figure 5 5 Bridg e of Croix des Missions in dry seasons

PAGE 77

77 Figure 5 6 Bridge of Croix des Missions in rainy seasons Figure 5 7 Shape of the c hannel at the stages gauge

PAGE 78

78 Figure 5 8 Distribution of the channel velocity inside the catchment

PAGE 79

79 CHAPTER 6 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS Model Justification for the W atershed The climate of the watershed where TOPMODEL is being applied varies whether it is the lowland or the mountain. In the lowl and, the rainfall varies form 1300 mm to around 1000mm while the climate is rather humid in the upstream with the annual rainfall varying from 1450 mm in Petion ville to 2000 mm in Kenscoff. The d epth to water is usually between 5 and 50 m. In the mounta in s, depth to water is usually higher than 100 m. Seasonal fluctuation in the water levels can be great (Knowles et al 1999). Also Haiti is a data sparse region. Too demanding model in parameter cannot be applied there since it is difficult to find necessa ry data for parameters calculation. As a result, the topographic and climate conditions of the watershed are not necessarily the best but are more or less suitable for the application of TOPMODEL Also, since TOPMODEL does not require to o many parameters compared to usual hydrological models, i t was a convenient choice to use TOPMODEL. DEM of the C atchment The Figure 6.1 a represents the DEM of the River Grise catchment resulted from ArcGIS processing. This processed DEM was used in the R TOPMODEL package to derive the Topographic Index. However, only the upstream part of this DEM contribute s as drainage area The Figure 6 2 represents the hydrological cumulative area map Located in the upper part of the watershed, only this area seems to contribute water based on the direction of the flow computed using the DEM. Wh ile the real watershed area is 3 9 3 km 2, approximately only 2 90 km 2 was able to be processe d by R TOPMODEL using the

PAGE 80

80 DEM. The determined outlet is different from the natural outlet observed on the real catchment. However, it is important to notify that the flow computational process of this R TOPMODEL version is based on multiple and single flow which is different from the algorithm used in ArcGIS. We also know that the lower part of this catchment is a flat area. Topographic Index R esults The Figure 6 3 presents the areal distribution of the Topographic I ndex in the River Grise watershed. The areal average of the t opographic index is 12.588 with the highest T opographic I ndex approximately 22 Howeve r, 93 percent of the surface o f the catchment delineated by TOPM O DEL has a topographic index lower than the average As presented in the F igure 4 1, the soil moisture deficit index in inversely proportional to the topographic index. Since the soil moisture deficit indicates when runoff starts for each grid cell, locations with low topographic index are more likely to generate runoff. T he areal distribution of the topographic index reveals that the t opographic i n dex is lognormally distributed and skewed to t he right in this catchment. More than 80 % of the watershed has a topographic index low er than 8. This catchment varies in altitude from approximately 50 m to 2000m and presents steep slopes which indicate that this soil can easily become dry. However, due to steep slopes that prevail in this catchment surface runoff can be very important. Depressions can be almost inexistent to stock water while infiltration can be expected to be low.

PAGE 81

81 Sensitivity Analysis The following paragraphs present the sensitivity ana lysis results. The sensitivity analyses were realized for the 5 years of data Both LSA (OAT) and GSA (Morris and FAST methods) results are presented below. Local Sensitivity Analysis (OAT) Model sensiti vity was performed for 10, 20, 25, 50, 75 100 15 0 of initial values of the parameters as presented in the T able 5 3. Model sensitivity is reported as the percent difference of model results as compared to the base simulation. The Figure 6 4 presents the influence of the parameters on the minimum flow s as depicted by the Local Sensitivity Analysis (LSA). The p a rameter m present s the most important influence. T he parameters l nTe Sr Max and K s are also showed important The slope showed by the parameters indicates their leve l of influence on t he output. The parameter m presents the largest slope within the range of variation w hich is within the range obtained from the calcu l ation s Also, the increase of the parameter m increases the mimimum flows. However the increases of the Sr Max and lnTe decrease the minimum flows. Local Sensitivity Analysis (LSA ) for the median flows is showed on the Figure 6 5 Within the range calculated from the watershed characteristics, the parameter Sr Max is the most important since its slope is larger for the range of distribut ion of the parameters. When the parameters Sr Max and m increase, the median flows decrease. The Figure 6 6 presents the influence of the pa rameters on the average flows The p a rameter Sr Max present s the most important influence for the range of variation c onsidered for the calculations of the parameters. Its slope is the steepest Other parameters such as hydraulic conductivity (ks) and the decay factor the decrease of the

PAGE 82

82 transmissivity with depth ( m ) are also important as showed on the Figure 6 6. Average runoff decreases also with the increase of the soil moisture defict. The same trend is observed for the parameters m and ks. The Figure 6 7 presents the influence of the parameters on the maximum flows as depicted by the Local Sensitivity Analysis (LSA). The channel velocity is clearly the most important parameter influencing the runoff. I t remains dom inant in all range of variation Maximum runoff increases with the increase of the channel velocity until it becomes stable. The Figure 6 8 presents the infl uence of the pa rameters on the Total flows for the Local Sensitivity Analysis (LSA). Likewise for the average flows, Sr Max present s the most important influence for the common range of variation considered for the calculations of the parameters The LSA me thod reveal that the most important parameters are the transmissivity (lnTe), the scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), Maxim um root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity (ks) the channel velocity inside the catchment (v r) Their sensitivity varies wih the type of flows The scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), Maxim um root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) seem to have a constant influence on almost all type of the flow outp ut whether it is low or high flow. Global Sensitivity Analysis The following paragraphs present the Morris and the FAST sensitivity analyses. Due to the similarity between the results of the analyses fo r average flows and total flows only the analyses fo r the total flows are presented.

PAGE 83

83 Morris sensitivity a nalysis The relative importan ce of the TOPMODEL parameters on the output based on the Morris Method is presented in the T able 6 1 Eighty (80) hydrographs were generated for the S ensitivity A nalysis Min imum, Maximum, Mean, Median and Total were calculated and were used for the sensitivity analysis. The graphs 6 9 to 6 1 3 plot the indexes of sensitivity of each parameter on the minimum, maximum, mean, median, and the t otal flows. represents the total influence of the factor which the sum of the primary and the interactions while the standard deviation ( ) represents the interactions themselves. While presenting more information showing the impact of interactions within the param eters the Morris method confirms the results revealed by the OAT analysis. The Figure 6 9 plots the Global sensitivity analysis results or the minimum flows obtained from the Morris screening method. As indicated on the graph, the areal logarithm of trans missivity ( l nTe), the decay factor ( m ), the moisture deficit (Sr Max ), and the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) are the most sensitive parameters for the minimum flows. However, the transmissivity decay seems to affect the most the minimum flows followed by the transmissivity. Not only are they important by their total influence but also they primarily impact since they are located below the angle 45 degree ( Morris, 1991 ). Hydraulic conductivity and the moisture deficit seem to have a greater contribution through interactions. While the impact of the channel velocity and the unsaturated zone time delay being null on the minimum flows, the capillary d rive seems to have a small impact with equal primary and interactions contributions.

PAGE 84

84 The impact of the parameters on the median (Q0.50) flows is presented on the Figure 6 10 The parameters such as the areal logarithm of transmissivity ( l nTe), the decay factor ( m ), the moisture deficit (Sr Max ), the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) and the channel velocity are the ones that i nfluence the output. However, the soil moisture deficit parameter has the greatest influence according to the results obtained from the Morris screening method. The hydraulic conductivity and areal logarithm of the transmissivity seem contribute equally by the primary and their interactions whereas the deficit moisture has a higher influence through his primary effect while the channel velocity presents higher influence by interactions Parameters such as Capillary Drive and unsaturated zone time delay for The Figure 6 11 presents the GSA results for the a veragel flows obtained by the Morris method. Three (3) parameters that are the soil moisture deficit (Sr Max ) the decay fac tor of the transmissivity with depth ( m ) and the hydraulic conductivity (ks) show important effect on the flows. The moisture deficit presents the greate st influence It also has the greate st prima ry effect. Th e scaling parameter for the decline of the transmissivity in the soil seems to contribute equally by interac tions and by its primary impact.It seems to be located on the bisectrix of the origin angle. The hydraulic conductivity seems to contribute more by its interactions. The other p arameters present no effect on the average flow s. The Figure 6 1 2 plots the Global sensitivity an alysis results the maximum flows obtained from the Morris screening method. All the parameters but the unsaturated zone time delay per unit storage deficit seem to be detached from the origin, and consequen tly have an influence on the output. The channel velocity presents a more

PAGE 85

85 important influence on the maximum flows whereas the other parameters seem to have small influence. It is also remarkable that all they parameters have a greater primary effect but t he channel velocity that seems to contribute equally by its primary effect and by its interactions. As indicated on the Figure 6 1 3 that presents the Global sensitivity analysis results or the Total flows obtained from the Morris screening method, only th ree parameters have an important effect on the total flows: the moisture deficit which presents the greater influence has also a greater primary effect, the scaling parameter for the decline of the transmissivity in the soil seems to contributes equally by interactions and by its primary impact, and the hydraulic conductivity that contributes more by its interactions. The pattern showed by the Total flow is the same as the one observed for the average flows Parameters such as the logarithm of the areal tran smissivity, the Capillary Drive, the channel velocity, and the unsaturated zone time delay for storage deficit present no effect on the total flows. The plots of the Screening Method results of the sensitivity indexes of the parameters reveal the parameter s are not all neither equally sensitive. Only five (5) of them such as the transmissivity (lnTe), the scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), Maxim um root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) the channel velocity ins ide the catchment (vr) seem to influence the runoff simulation of R TOPMODEL. Also their influence seems to vary whether the flows are low or high. The Morris analy sis reveals that the scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), Maxim um root zo ne storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity

PAGE 86

86 (k s ) seem to constantly influence the flow output whether it is low or high flow. This is illustrated in the Figures 6 9 to 6 1 3 However, the channel velocity inside the catchment (vr) seems to have si gnificant influence on the median (Q0.50) and the maximum flows. Parameters such as u nsaturated zone time dela y per unit storage deficit (td) and capillary drive (CD) seem to have no influence on the output. FAST sensitivity a nalysis The process used for t he Morris Method was duplicated for the FAST Method analysis. The relative importance of the TOPMODEL parameters on the output based on the FAST Met hod is presented in the Table 6 2 and T able 6 3. Seven thousands (7000) simulations were generated for the S ensitivity Analysis. Minimum m aximum, m ean and median and total hydrographs were calculated and were used for the sensitivity analysis. Two categories of plots are presented. First, the sensitivity indexes of the first order which indicate the impacts of the parameters without interactions; Second, the level of influence of the parameters through interactions. The interactions are obtained by subtracting the first order indices from the total order indices The analyses were performed using the minimum, me dian, mean, maximum, and total flows. The Figure 6 1 4 Figure 6 1 5 and Figure 6 1 6 plot the Global sensitivity Test results obtained from the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method. According to the plots the scaling parameter for the transmissivity ( m ) the areal logarithm of transmissivity (lnTe), the maximum storage deficit (Sr Max ), and the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) are the most sensitive parameters for the minimum flows. However, the scaling parameter of the transmissivity affects the most the mini mum flows and remains the

PAGE 87

87 classification (Sobol et al 1993) since it is the only one to present a total index higher than 0.5 ( Figure 6 1 4 ) As indicated by the Figure 6 1 5 the primary effects of the parameters such a s channel velocity, the capillary drive and the unsaturated zone time delay of the storage deficit are null. It is also noticeable that interactions have low impacts on the minimum flows as confirmed by the Figure 6 1 6 The impacts of the parameters on the median (Q0.50) flows are presented on the Figure 6 1 4 and Figure 6 1 5 According to the Figure 6 1 4 the maximum storage deficit (Sr Max ) controls the median flows. While Sr Max is responsible for approximately 65% all the remaining parameters show indexes l ower than 5%. A ll the parameters seem to influence the median flows (Q0.50) laying within the range of 10% to 20%. However, Max is very important while the others are irrelevant. Based on the GSA results obt ained from the FAST method depicted on the Figure 6 1 4 the maximum moisture deficit parameter is the most important factor influencing primarily the average flows It is responsible for approximately 85% followed insignificantly by the scaling parameter fo r the decline of the transmissivity with depth ( m ), and the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) that are responsible for less than 10%. Also, the interaction effects are very low on the average flows; as a result some parameters such as the unsaturated zone time d elay for moisture deficit (td), the channel velocity (vr) and capillary drive (CD) appear to be negligible. Likewise the OAT and the Morris analyses, The FAST analysis o f the average flows presents the same pattern as the total flows

PAGE 88

88 The Global Sensitivity Analysis obtained from the FAST method for the first order indexes shows that only the channel velocity has a very significant impact on the maximum flows as presented that the Figure 6 1 5 It is responsible for 40%; all the other parameters appear to be negligible. However, the Figure 6 1 6 which presents the FAST results of the interactions seems to show that all the parameters have significant influence on the maximum flows in the River Grise watershed. They vary from 30% to 50%. However based on the Sob 5, only parameters with total sensitivity index (TSI) higher than 0.3 would be considered as important. In this case, only three (3) parameters would remain important that are the decay parameter for the transmissivit y decrease with depth ( m ), the soil moisture deficit (Sr Max ) and the channel velocity (vr) would be important for this study. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method used for the sensitivi ty analysis strengthens and quantifies the results revealed by the Morris method. The sensitivity varies with the parameters and with low and high flows. T he transmissivity ( l nTe ), the scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), maximum root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ), the hydraulic conductivity (k s ) an d the channel velocity inside the catchment (vr) are the parameters that have influenced the hydrologic response of the catchment. T he scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), maximum root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ), and the hydraulic cond uctivity (k s ) seem to remain constantly the most sensitive. However, only important m, vr and Sr Max appear to be important or very important based on the type of flows while the other parameters are whether not important or irrelevant based on the type of flows.

PAGE 89

89 Parameters such as the u nsaturated zone time dela y per unit storage deficit (td) and capillary drive (CD) seem to be present more through interactions. Discussions of the P arameters I mpacts The m parameter The m parameter is the model parameter th at controls the rate of decline of transmissivity in the soil profile (Beven, 1984). The simulation of the River Grise basin by TOPMODEL reveals that the m parameter is very sensitive for both Global and Local Sensitivity Analyses. It appears to be the mos t sensitive for the minimum flows with which it varies proportionally. According to the Figure 6 4, in the range of variation of the decay parameter of the transmissivity with soil depth ( m ) for the watershed as presented in the Table 5 2, when the paramet er increases the minimum flow s increases and vice versa. However the parameter m is inversely to the other flows. When it decreases the average flows, the median flows, the maximum flows and the total increase and vice versa. As a parameter related to rece ssion flow in the watershed it seems to be reasonable that m be the most important parameter for minimum flows. It can be assumed that the methodology used for the calculation of the parameter is consistent with the nature of the parameters itself. In ter m of management actions, the parameter m can help in predicting the water lost by the aquifer or even expected in the downstream for others activities. In dry seas ons, the river is alimented by the groundwater that consequently decreases The recession cur ve can tell about the volume stored at any given time. Indeed, if m is determined f or a specific watershed it is possible to evaluate its storage capacity by integration over the time interval The determination of the water available in recession

PAGE 90

90 time is important to evaluate the amount of water to provide in support to the low flow in dry seasons. The l nTe parameter The l nTe parameter is the natural logarithm of the effective transmissivity of the soil at saturation [m 2 /h]. This parameter is also an impo rtant parameter as indicated by both sensitivity analysis methods. It appears to be more sensitive for the minimum flows likewise its scaling parameter m. It does not seem to be very sensitive for any other type of flows. It varies proportionally with the minimum flows. When it decreases the flows decrease and vice versa. However, likewise m its variation is inversely proportional to the other flows. When the natural logarithm of the effective transmissivity of the soil at saturation decreases these flows increase and vice versa. Likewise the parameter m it is related to the recession (minimum flows) in the watershed The transmissivity of the soil can tell about the ability of the soils in the watershed to stock water in rainy seasons and to release it du ring the dry seasons. The Sr Max parameter The Sr Max parameter is the maximum root zone storag e deficit parameter in TOPMODEL It controls the moisture deficit in the soil. It is the most sensitive parameter of TOPMODEL as revealed in this study. It appear s to be important whether for minimum, average or high flows. As a continuous model, TOPMODEL accounts for the amount of moisture in the soil between rainfall events. According to the stage dataset, the watershed seems not to suffer from long term drought. Also, by nature, the moisture deficit is built to reflect any moisture situation in the watershed. It is more likely to be sensitive to any types of flows.

PAGE 91

91 It is important to notice that the soil moisture deficit is inversely proportional with all types o f flows. When the moisture deficit increases the flows decreases and vice versa. This is very important in term of management actions. By increasing the capacity of the soil to stock more water the amount of water to be released on rainfall event will nece ssarily decrease. The importance of vegetation in increasing the porosity of the soil is well known. Therefore a reforestation campaign can be a good action against flood occurrence in the watershed. The k s parameter The k s parameter is the surface hydraul ic conductivity at saturation [m/h]. This parameter is also an important parameter as indicated by both sensitivity analysis methods. It is one the most widely sensitive parameters. It appears to be sensitive for all types of flows. It is well know that th e hydraulic conductivity is very important parameter for the runoff gener ation in every hydrologic model since it describes the ease with which water move s through pore spaces The hydraulic conductivity presents a proportional relationship with the minimu m flows for values between 0.25 and 1 m/h before starting to present no significant increase of the minimum flows. The relationship seems to level off after the hydraulic conductivity reaches 1m/h It also seems to present a proportional relationship with the maximum flows but it is not significant However the relationship seems to be inversely proportional to the other flows. The hydraulic conductivity is Hydraulic conductivity is a property of the porous media. It depends on the pore size, its distributi on, and its connectivity. Vegetation can help in fracturing the soil to create more pores. When the porosity of the soil increases the hydraulic conductivity will also increase.

PAGE 92

92 The vr parameter The vr parameter is the channel flow inside catchment [m/h] The simulation of the River Grise basin by TOPMODEL reveals that the channel velocity is also sensitive for both Global and Local Sensitivity Analyses. It appears to be the most sensitive for the maximum flows. It does not seem to be too sensitive for oth er types of flows but maximum and median flows. This is the parameter of the effective surface routing velocity for the distance/area procedure. As linear routing is assumed in TOPMODEL, it is comprehensible that the parameter is more important for high fl ows The channel velocity presents proportional variation with the maximum flow. The velocity. The parameters td and CD The parameters td [h/m] and CD [m] that repr esent respectively the unsaturated zone time delay for root zone deficit and the capillary drive happen not to be really sensitive in the simulation of the River Grise catchment. They se em to have no primary effect on any flows. Their contributions appear only through interactions with other parameters. The situation of these parameters in this study happens not to be different from what that h as been found in the literature. Theseparameters did not show any significant variation with any type of flows. Ind eed this was expeted because these parameters remain non important in these study and are usually revealed to be non important in the literature related to TOPMODEL application studies.

PAGE 93

93 Discussions of the S ensitivity Analysis R esults The results obtained t he three analysis methods seems not to be significantly different. They are even more similar for some specific output such as the minimum flows, the average flows and the total flows. It seems that the interactions which are taken into account in the glob al sensitivity analysis (GSA) and neglected in the local sensitivity analysis (LSA) are really not important for almost all the outputs. W hen the interactions are important for the maximum flows for example the parameters that have the most important prim ary effects are also the ones that have the most important interaction effects As a result, their total sensitivity index remains the most important for both GSAand LSA methods. FAST Uncertainties Likewise the sensitivity analysis, simulation results prov ided by some selected outputs of the FAST analysis have been used to carry out uncertainty analyses. The uncertainty analysis determines the ranges of variation of the flows whithin the watershed. Analyses have been carried out for Minimum, Median, Mean, M aximum and Total and are presented on the Figures 6 1 7 to 6 2 1 Table 6 4 presents the uncertainty analysis statistics for the probability distributions of the selected results. As indicated in the Table 6 4 the 95% confidence interval for the minimum flo ws lays within the 0.002 0.006 m 3 /3h. With an average flow of 0.004m 3 /3h, its cumulative distribution frequency represented by the Figure 6 1 7 reveals that almost 95% of the flows are lower than 0.01m 3 /3h. The median flows vary from 0.011 m 3 /3hto 0.2 5 3 m 3 /3h. The statistics are presented in th e T able 6 4 .The 95 % confidence i nterval goes from 0.049 to 0.148

PAGE 94

94 m 3 /3h with an average of 0.103 m 3 /3h. Approximately 85% of the flows are lower than 0.13 m 3 / 3h as presented in the Figure 6 1 8 The average flows v ary from 0.333 m 3 /3h to 0.467 m 3 /3h with an a verage of 0.3 9 0 m 3 /3h.The 95 % confidence interval lays within 0.357 m 3 /3h 0.427 m 3 /3h (Table 6 4 ).The distribution of frequency of the flows presents a normal distribution shape. However, the cumulative distri bution frequency (CDF) reveals that more than 85 % of the flows is lower than 0.41 m 3 /3h.The average itself (0.389 m 3 /3h) is higher than more than 80 % of flows as indicated in the Figure 6 1 9 The maximum flows represented by the Figure 6 20 present a ver y particular shape compare to rest of the flows. The 95% confidence interval varies within 6.40 3 m 3 /3h and 6.554 m 3 /3h. The range of variability is goes from 6.107 m 3 /3h to 6.569 m 3 /3h with an average of 6.538m 3 /3h. The distribution of the frequency is ver y much skewed to the left. Most of the distribution of frequency represents approximately 10 % of the cumulative distribution function. The distribution seems to be lognormal as showed in the Figure 6 20 Th e total for the 5 years under analysis presents a very normal distribution of the flows. The statistics are presented in the T able 6 4 and the Figure 6 2 1 presents the cumulative distribution of frequency and the density of the distribution. The flow range varies between 4866.803 m 3 /3h and 6810.111 m 3 /3h .The average flow is 5689.584 m 3 /3h which is not very different from the median flow. The 95 % confidence interval goes from 5208.013 m 3 /3h to 6817.795 m 3 /3h. Approximately 90% of the flow is cumulative distribution of the frequency curve (CDF) is lower tha n 5,966.44 m 3 /3h.

PAGE 95

95 Table 6 1. Three ( 3 ) hours sensitivity Indexes for the Morris Analysis QMinimum Q050 QMean QMaximum QTotal Morris Index Mu Sigma Mu Sigma Mu Sigma Mu Sigma Mu Sigma l nTe 0.0023 0.0011 0.0032 0.0025 0.00052 0.000559 0.0073 0.005 5 8.0429 8.262 m 0.0026 0.000846 0.0151 0.006 0.0135 0.0037 0.0074 0.0043 197.1407 54.4739 Sr Max 0.0009 0.00093 0.0546 0.019 0.0507 0.0063 0.0044 0.0047 741.2635 91.6451 t d 0 0 0.00008 0.00014 0.00002 6.32E 05 0.0004 0.000843 0.4047 0.9028 Vr 0 0 0.022 8 0.0243 0 0 0.0202 0.0338 0.2154 0.0306 ks 0.0008 0.000 9 0.0103 0.0088 0.0106 0.0082 0.0075 0.006 155.0077 119.45 CD 0.000 1 0.0001 0.000 8 0.0007 0.000 8 0.0004 0.0019 0.0027 11.575 6.5966 Mu: Mean Sigma: Standard deviation QMinimum: Minimum flows QMea n: Average flows Q050: Median flows QMaximum: Maximum flows QTotal: Total flows

PAGE 96

96 Table 6 2 Three (3) hours sensitivity Indexes for the FAST First Order Analysis FAST First Order indexes Parameters QMinimum Q050 QMean QMaximum QTotal LnTe 0.2528 0.0022 7.61E 05 0.000363 7.45E 05 M 0.4748 0.0331 0.0587 0.000728 0.0587 SrMax 0.0833 0.6545 0.8474 0.0018 0.8474 Td 3.41E 05 5.98E 05 4.25E 05 0.000198 4.24E 05 Vr 9.66E 06 0.03 4.38E 05 0.4076 4.35E 05 K0 0.0578 0.0213 0.0311 0.0029 0.0311 CD 0.000317 0. 000433 0.000445 0.000223 0.000444 QMinimum: Minimum flows QMean: Average flows Q050: Median flows QMaximum: Maximum flows QTotal: Total flows

PAGE 97

97 Table 6 3. Three (3) hours sensitivity Indexes for the FAST Total Order Analysis QMinimum: Minimum flows QMean: Average flows Q050: Median flows QMaximum: Maximum flows QTotal: Total flows FAST Tota l O rder Indexes Parameters QMinimum Q050 QMean QMaximum QTotal LnTe 0.313557 0.116777 0.019069 0.311441 0.01905 m 0.53126 0.173188 0.078369 0.316737 0.0 78375 SrMax 0.12617 0.844516 0.911686 0.309478 0.911699 t d 0.010351 0.120499 0.026736 0.299767 0.0267 v r 0.012245 0.221672 0.02812 0.920816 0.02813 1 K0 0.09388 0.179756 0.056358 0.43335 0.056325 CD 0.016355 0.16329 0.030488 0.424807 0.030478

PAGE 98

98 Tab le 6 4 .Uncertainty analysis statistics for probability distributions obtained from the FAST results Range Mean Min Q2 95 %CI Max Kurtosis Skew S tandard D eviation Qminimum 0.008 0.004 0.000 0.004 0.002 0.006 0.008 0.236 0.280 0. 001 Q0025 0.015 0.007 0.001 0.006 0.003 0.011 0.015 0.194 0.532 0.002 Q025 0.024 0.011 0.003 0.010 0.005 0.020 0.027 0.589 0.550 0.004 Q050 0.242 0.103 0.011 0.105 0.049 0.148 0.253 1.300 0.064 0.025 Qmean 0.134 0.390 0.333 0.389 0.357 0.427 0.467 0 .407 0.291 0.018 Q075 0.331 0.616 0.468 0.618 0.523 0.710 0.799 0.236 0.015 0.049 Q0975 0.353 1.836 1.650 1.832 1.754 1.932 2.003 0.133 0.201 0.046 Qmaximum 0.462 6.538 6.107 6.548 6.403 6.554 6.569 33.322 5.401 0.041 Qtotal 1951 5690 4867 5678.6 52 09.6 6236.5 6817.8 0.407 0.291 261.405 Range: Difference between Maximum flows and Minimum flows M in: Minimum flows Q2 : Flows for 0.50 percentile M ean: Average flows M ax: Maximum flows Qtotal: Total flows

PAGE 99

99 Figure 6 1. DEM of the River Grise catchment

PAGE 100

100 Figure 6 2. M ap of the area processed by R TOPMODEL

PAGE 101

101 Figure 6 3 Areal distribution of the Topographic Index

PAGE 102

102 Figure 6 4 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the minimum flow s Figure 6 5 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Media n flow s

PAGE 103

103 Figure 6 6. OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Average flows Figure 6 7 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Maximum flows

PAGE 104

104 Figure 6 8 OAT sensitivity of the parameters for the Total flows

PAGE 105

105 Figure 6 9 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the minimum flow s Figure 6 10 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the Median flow s

PAGE 106

106 Figure 6 11. Morris Sensitivity Index of the par ameters for the Average flows Figure 6 1 2 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the maximum flow s

PAGE 107

107 Figure 6 13 Morris Sensitivity Index of the parameters for the Total flow s

PAGE 108

108 Figur e 6 1 4 FAST Sensitivity for the Total order indexes of the parameters Figure 6 1 5 FAST Sensitivity for the First order indexes of the parameters

PAGE 109

109 Figure 6 1 6 FAST Sensitivity for the interactions of the parameters

PAGE 110

110 Figure 6 17 Probability distribution of the mimimum flows Figure 6 1 8 Probability distribution of the median flows

PAGE 111

111 Figure 6 1 9 Probability distribution of the average flows Figure 6 20 Probability distribution of the maximum flows

PAGE 112

112 Figure 6 21 Probability distribu tion of the total flows

PAGE 113

113 CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSION S AND RECOMMENDATIONS Conclusions The implementati on of TOPMODEL in R known as T OPMODEL package was applied to the flood prone River Grise basin to simulate the hydrological response of the watershed and to det ermine the parameters of the model that can influence the most this response. As TOPMODEL tends to compute the areas that have contributed water to the runoff process based on topographic index the downstream part of the catchment, which is a flat area, se ems not to be considered as contributing area. As a result, while the total are a of the watershed is about 393 km 2 only approximately 2 90 km 2 which constitutes the catchment delineated by TOPMODEL ( outlet different from the natural outlet) was able to be processed in the hydrological simulation process. The topographic index from the natural outlet could not be determined In fact, the topographic index which determines the hydrological similarity of each part of the catchment is calculated as a function of the slope. Since estim ating slopes in flat areas is a critical issue (Pan, et al ., 2004) r.topidx seems to assign null values to the flat portion of the catchment. In this study, the calculations and the I dentification of parameters probability distri butions based on field data were attempted. Some parameters were calculated as described in previous studies that have used TOPMODEL but others such as the scaling parameter that controls the rate of decline of transmissivity in the soil profile was calcu lated by using soil data information from the literature.

PAGE 114

114 Global and Local Sensitivity Analyses were performed in this study. The Local sensitivity Analysis (LSA) allows the quantification of the effect of each input on the overall output variance. It also indicates the range within the parameter can influence the output the most The Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA), mainly the FAST method, allows the separation of first order versus total order effects Both FAST and Morris methods that were used for the global sensitivity analysis showed that the sensitivity varies with flows type neither all the parameters are not sensitive. Only five (5) of them such as the transmissivity ( l nTe ), the scaling parameter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), Maxim um root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity ( k s ) the channel velocity inside the catchment (vr) seem to influence the runoff simulation of R TOPMODEL. Also their influence seems to vary whether the flows are low or high. Besides the hydraulic c onductivity ( k s ) the moisture deficit parameter (Sr Max ), and the rate of decl ine of the transmissivity with depth ( m ) t hat seem to impact the hydrologic response of the catchment whether the flows are low average or high, the channel velocity (vr) seems t o specially impact high flows with no impact on the total flows The sensitivity analyse s results seem to confirm what other studies using TOPMODEL have already revealed. According to Montesinos Barrios and Beven (2004), t he model is very sensitive to the variations of the soil transmissivity decay parameter, the soil transmissivity at saturation, the root zone storage capacity and the ch annel routing velocity in large catchments As demonstrated in this study, t he transmissivity ( l nTe ), the scaling parame ter of the decline of transmissivity ( m ), m axim um root zone storage deficit (Sr Max ) the hydraulic conductivity ( k s ) are the most

PAGE 115

115 sensitive parameters of TOPMODEL. T he channel velocity inside the catchment (vr ), though less sensitive than the other previou s parameters, is also sensitive for high flows Parameters such as the u nsaturated zone time dela y per unit storage deficit (td) and capillary drive (CD) seem to have no influence on the output flow whatsoever. Is it also remarkable that not all versions o f TOPMODEL use this parameter (vr) Morris is a qualitative screening method while FAST is a quantitative method that confirmed the results from Morris. Besides the maximums flows, the uncertainty analysis is quite similar for the rest of the flows. They a ll present a relatively normal distri bution sometimes skewed to the left According to the uncertainty analysis, mimimum flows in the watershed is expected to be in the range of null to 0.008 m 3 /3h. This seems to relate the situation on the ground because the river has run out water in its lower part in some dry seasons and cannot reach the natural outlet. The average flows vary from 0.333 m 3 /3h to 0.467 m 3 /3h with an a verage of 0.3 9 0 m 3 /3h.The 95 % confidence interval lays within 0.357 m 3 /3h 0.427 m 3 /3h However, the cumulative distribution frequency (CDF) reveals that more than 85 % of the flows is lower than 0.41 m 3 /3h. The maximum flows presented a very particular shape compare to rest of the flows. The 95% confidence interval varies within 6.40 3 m 3 /3h and 6.554 m 3 /3h. The range of variability is goes from 6.107 m 3 /3h to 6.569 m 3 /3h with an average of 6.538m 3 /3h. The distribution of the frequency is very much skewed to the left. Most of

PAGE 116

116 the distribution of frequency represents approximately 10 % of the c umulative distribution function. The dis tribution seems to be lognormal. It is important to notice that the hydraulic conductivity which is usually described as lognormally distributed was processed as uniformly distributed in this study. The equation of K ozeny Carman has been used to determine the hydraulic conductivity. Unlike others parameters which calculations methods have clearly shown their distribution, no distribution pattern was observed for the hydraulic conductivity and was processed as uniforma lly distributed. Also the importance of the parameters can tell about management actions needed to undertaken according to the management type that is pursuing. It was demonstrated that the soil moisture deficit is inversely proportional to the flows and s ould be increased in a perspective of flood control for example. The m parameter which is related to the recession curve is also very important in the watershed. The recession curve tells about the amount of water that can be released in dry seasons and co nsequently help in predicting the supporting amount of water to provide to satisfy the needs for downstream activities in dry seasons. Recommendations This study aimed at determining the hydrological behavior of the River Grise catchment using the impleme ntation of the TOPMODEL in R. Attempts to define with precision parameters of the model using field data available in the literature have been made. However, as presented in the results TOPMODEL seems to perform only for part of the catchment. The outlet p rocessed by the model is different from the natural outlet; as a result a subcatchment representing the upstream of the watershed is delineated by

PAGE 117

117 the model. This issue seems to be due to the flatness of the downstream of the watershed. In fact, the topogr aphic index calculation using the DEM seems not to perform well in the flat area of the catchment. The quality of the DEM can also be considered. The performance of the model cannot be measured because there is no measured flow data that is necessary to co nduct the calibration and the validation which can con firm the effectiveness of the TOPMODEL application to model the River Grise basin. Besides the proper behavior of the parameters as revealed by their influence on the flows, it is important to collect f ield f low data to perform calibration. The calibration process will co nfirm the effectiveness of the TOPMODEL performance in the River Grise watershed It is also important to notice that in the perspective of flood occurrence, it would be important to ana lyze the stages in the watershed which this study did not consider.

PAGE 118

118 APPENDIX A MORRIS CODE IN R setwd("C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel") library(topmodel) library(stinepack) library(e1071) library(Hmisc) library(sensitivity ) library(zoo) library(xlsReadWrite) library(xts) library(matrixStats) DEM < read.table("DEM2.txt") DEM < as.matrix(DEM) DEM[DEM== 9999] < NA library(lattice) #levelplot(DEM) # Fill sin k0 DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sin kfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1 ) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) # View effect of filling sin k0 difference < DEM.filled DEM # Calculate Topographic Index topindex < topidx(DEM.filled, res=30) # View atb le velplot(topindex$atb) # View area levelplot(topindex$area) topindex < make.classes(topindex$atb,16) # Note in the area plot that the highest contributing area is approximately # at row 381 and column 519 and not at 1,1. This is likely due to the lower # portion of the basin being very flat with no "clear" flow direction to be # found. In order to use the entire watershed, we may need to "burn" in the # river. # Calculate flow length and delay using the point with highest contributing # area. flowlength < flowlength(DEM.filled, c(381,519)) 30 flowlength < hist(flowlength,5) delay < data.frame(distance = flowlength$brea k0 area = c(0,flowlength$counts) / sum(flowlength$counts))

PAGE 119

119 delay[,2] < cumsum(delay[,2]) ##DATA UPLOADING ##3HRS DATA hrsweather< r ead.table("Data3hrs.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") hrsrain < hrsweather[,1] hrsET0< hrsweather[,2] ##DAILY DATA dailyweather< read.table("Datadaily.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") dailyrain < dailyweather[,1] dailyET0< dailyweather[,2] ## MONTHLY DATA Monthw eather< read.table("Datamonth.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") Monthrain < Monthweather[,1] MonthET0< Monthweather[,2] ##ANNUAL DATA Anweather< read.table("Datayear.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") Anrain < Anweather[,1] AnET0< Anweather[,2] ##SIMULATION, MEAN STANDARD DEVIATION AND CONFIDENCE INTERVAL CALCULATIONS ## MORRIS SIMULATION ##Parameters declaration param< read.table("paramMorris.txt") qs0 < 0.27 LnTe < param[,1] m < param[,2] Sr0 < 0.01 Srmax < param[,3] td < param[,4] vch < 4 500 vr < param[,5] k0 < param[,6] CD < param[,7] dt < 3 Morrisparameters < cbind(qs0, LnTe m, Sr0, Srmax, td, vch, vr, k0, CD, dt) ##Simulation QsimhrsMorris < topmodel(Morrisparameters, topindex, delay, hrsrain, hrsET0) SumhrsMorris< c olSums(QsimhrsMorris) ## Table of the outputs write.table(SumhrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.top model/ SumhrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") ##Table Means, Standard Deviation and Confidence Interval MeanhrsMorris< colMeans(QsimhrsMo rris) write.table(MeanhrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.to pmodel/ MeanhrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t")

PAGE 120

120 StandarddevhrsMorris< colSds(QsimhrsMorris) write.table(StandarddevhrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ ex /r.topmodel/ StandarddevhrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") QMhrs0.025< colQuantiles(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.025) write.table(QMhrs0.025,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ QMhrs0.025.xls", sep=" \ t") QMhrs0.50< colQuantiles(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.50) write.table(QMhrs0.50,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmo del/ QMhrs0.50.xls", sep=" \ t") QMhrs0.975< colQuantiles(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.975) write.table(QMhrs0.975,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r .topm odel/ QMhrs0.975.xls", sep=" \ t") QMhrs1< colQuantiles(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.25) write.table(QMhrs1,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel/ QMhrs1.xls", sep=" \ t") QMhrs3< colQuantiles(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.75) write.table(QMh rs3,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel/ QMhrs3.xls", sep=" \ t") MinhrsMorris< colMins(QsimhrsMorris) write.table(MinhrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ MinhrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") MaxhrsMo rris< colMaxs(QsimhrsMorris) write.table(MaxhrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.top model/ MaxhrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") SkewnesshrsMorris< skewness(QsimhrsMorris) write.table(SkewnesshrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel _ex/r.topmodel_ex /r.topmodel/ SkewnesshrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") KurtosishrsMorris< kurtosis(QsimhrsMorris) write.table(KurtosishrsMorris,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r. topmodel/ KurtosishrsMorris.xls", sep=" \ t") MeanhrsMorrismatrix< mean(QsimhrsMorris) StandarddevhrsMorrisMatrix< apply(QsimhrsMorris, 2, sd) QMhrs0.025Matrix< quantile(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.025) QMhrs0.50Matrix< quantile(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.50) QMhrs0.975Matrix< quantile(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.975) QMhrs1Matrix< q uantile(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.25) QMhrs3Matrix< quantile(QsimhrsMorris, probs=0.75) MinhrsMorrisMatrix< min(QsimhrsMorris) MaxhrsMorrisMatrix< max(QsimhrsMorris) SkewnesshrsMorrisMatrix< skewness(QsimhrsMorris) KurtosishrsMorrisMatrix< kurtosis(QsimhrsMor ris) ## Uncertainty values MeanhrsMorrismatrix StandarddevhrsMorrisMatrix QMhrs0.025Matrix QMhrs0.50Matrix

PAGE 121

121 QMhrs0.975Matrix QMhrs1Matrix QMhrs3Matrix MinhrsMorrisMatrix MaxhrsMorrisMatrix SkewnesshrsMorrisMatrix KurtosishrsMorrisMatrix

PAGE 122

122 APPENDIX B FAST CO DE IN R S etwd ("C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel") library(topmodel) library(stinepack) library(e1071) library(Hmisc) library(sensitivity) library(zoo) library(xlsReadWrite) library(xts) library(matrixStats) DEM < read.table( "DEM2.txt") DEM < as.matrix(DEM) DEM[DEM== 9999] < NA library(lattice) #levelplot(DEM) # Fill sin k0 DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree= 0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.filled, res=30, degree=0.1) DEM.filled < sinkfill(DEM.fill ed, res=30, degree=0.1) # View effect of filling sin k0 difference < DEM.filled DEM # Calculate Topographic Index topindex < topidx(DEM.filled, res=30) # View atb levelplot(topindex$atb) # View area levelplot(topindex$area) topindex < make.classes(top index$atb,16) # Note in the area plot that the highest contributing area is approximately # at row 381 and column 519 and not at 1,1. This is likely due to the lower # portion of the basin being very flat with no "clear" flow direction to be # found. In order to use the entire watershed, we may need to "burn" in the # river. # Calculate flow length and delay using the point with highest contributing # area. flowlength < flowlength(DEM.filled, c(381,519)) 30 flowlength < hist(flowlength,5)

PAGE 123

123 delay < d ata.frame(distance = flowlength$brea k0 area = c(0,flowlength$counts) / sum(flowlength$counts)) delay[,2] < cumsum(delay[,2]) ##DATA UPLOADING ##3HRS DATA hrsweather< read.table("Data3hrs.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") hrsrain < hrsweather[,1] hrsET0< hrs weather[,2] ##DAILY DATA dailyweather< read.table("Datadaily.txt", header=FALSE, sep=" \ t") dailyrain < dailyweather[,1] dailyET0< dailyweather[,2] ##FAST SIMULATION ##Parmeters declaration param< read.table("paramFAST.txt") qs0 < 0.27 LnTe < param[,1] m < param[,2] Sr0 < 0.01 Srmax < param[,3] td < param[,4] vch < 4500 vr < param[,5] k0 < param[,6] CD < param[,7] dt < 3 Fastparameters < cbind(qs0, LnTe m, Sr0, Srmax, td, vch, vr, k0, CD, dt) ##Simulation of the output s Qsimhrsfast < topmodel(Fastparameters, topindex, delay, hrsrain, hrsET0) Sumhrsfast< colSums(Qsimhrsfast) ##Tables of the outputs write.table(Sumhrsfast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmo del/ Sumhrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t") Meanhrs fast< colMeans(Qsimhrsfast) write.table(Meanhrsfast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ Meanhrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs0.10fast< colQuantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.10) write.table(Qhrs0.10fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmod el_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ Qhrs0.10fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs0.025fast< colQuantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.025) write.table(Qhrs0.025fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.top model/ Qhrs0.025fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs0.50fast< colQua ntiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.50)

PAGE 124

124 write.table(Qhrs0.50fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ Qhrs0.50fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs0.50fast< colQuantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.50) write.table(Qhrs0.50fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r. topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topm odel/ Qhrs0.50fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs0.975fast< colQuantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.975) write.table(Qhrs0.975fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.top model/ Qhrs0.975fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs1fast< col Quantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.25) write.table(Qhrs1fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmod el/ Qhrs1fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Qhrs3fast< colQuantiles(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.75) write.table(Qhrs3fast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_e x/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmod el/ Qhrs3fast.xls", sep=" \ t") Minhrsfast< colMins(Qsimhrsfast) write.table(Minhrsfast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmod el/ Minhrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t") Maxhrsfast< colMaxs(Qsimhrsfast) write.table (Maxhrsfa st,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel/ Maxhrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t") Skewnesshrsfast< skewness(Qsimhrsfast) write.table(Skewnesshrsfast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.t opmodel/ Skewnesshrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t ") Kurtosishrsfast< kurtosis(Qsimhrsfast) write.table(Kurtosishrsfast,"C:/Users/Joseph/Desktop/r.topmodel_ex/r.topmodel_ex/r.top model/ Kurtosishrsfast.xls", sep=" \ t") Meanhrsfastmatrix< mean(Qsimhrsfast) StandarddevhrsfastMatrix< apply(Qsimhrsfast, 2, sd) Qhrs0.025fastMatrix< quantile(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.025) Qhrs0.50fastMatrix< quantile(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.50) Qhrs0.975fastMatrix< quantile(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.975) Qhrs1fastMatrix< quantile(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.25) Qhrs3fastMatrix< quantile(Qsimhrsfast, probs=0.75) MinhrsfastMatrix< min(Qsimhrsfast) MaxhrsfastMatrix< max(Qsimhrsfast) SkewnesshrsfastMatrix< skewness(Qsimhrsfast) KurtosishrsfastMatrix< kurtosis(Qsimhrsfast) ## Uncertainty values Meanhrsfastmatrix StandarddevhrsfastMatrix Qhrs0.025fastMatr ix Qhrs0.50fastMatrix Qhrs0.975fastMatrix Qhrs1fastMatrix

PAGE 125

125 Qhrs3fastMatrix MinhrsfastMatrix MaxhrsfastMatrix SkewnesshrsfastMatrix KurtosishrsfastMatrix

PAGE 126

126 APPENDIX C MATLAB CODE C1. MATLAB CODE A %Program to write file in desired SIMLAB format for temporal output clear all ; clc; [data]=xlsread( 'Qhrsfast.xlsx' ); [n,m]=size(data); %data(1:n 1,1:m)=data(2:n,1:m) fid=fopen( 'Qhrsfast.out' 'w' ); %Chage output file nme as required fprintf(fid, '%d \ n' ,m); fprintf(fid, 'QMinimum \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q0025 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q010 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q025 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q050 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'QMean \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q075 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q090 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q0975 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'QMaximum \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'QTotal \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q090010 \ n' ); fprintf(fid, 'Q090050 \ n' ); f printf(fid, 'Q050040n' ); fprintf(fid, 'time = no \ n' ); fprintf(fid, '%d \ n' ,n); for j=1:n fprintf(fid, '%4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f %4.4f \ n' ,data(j,1),data(j,2),data(j,3), data(j,4),data(j,5),data(j,6),data(j, 7),data(j,8),data(j,9),data(j,10),data(j,11),data(j,12),dat a(j,13),data(j,14)); end fclose(fid);

PAGE 127

127 C2. MAT L AB CODE B % Read in 3 hours temperature files and abstract the daily maximum and minimum temperature % and calculate the daily mean temperautre, and then concatenate into three % single files clear; directory = pwd; % Need to be changed if different path newdir = [directory, '/processed' ]; cd (newdir) dayPosition =1; % Day 1 is 1/1/1979 %Need to be changed if different grids; [y,x,days] aPCP = N aN(3,2,97880); for i=1979:2012 year = int2str(i); fileName = [ 'apcp.HaitiBV.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % abstract data lat = nc_varget(fileName, 'lat' ); % 3 pts currently lon = nc_varget(fileName, 'lon' ); % 2 pts currently time = nc_ varget(fileName, 'time' ); % 3 hours time step T3hrs = nc_varget(fileName, 'apcp' ); % Has dimensions: (3,2,time) T3hrs(T3hrs<0)=0; maxTime = max(time); aPCP(:,:,dayPosition:dayPosition+maxTime 1) = T3hrs; dayPosition = day Position+maxTime; end days = 722816:0.125:735050; % Matlab serial dates, 1/1/1979 6/30/2012 days = days'; %% Write to mean temperature file cd (directory); newFileName=( 'PCP_HaitiBV.nc' );

PAGE 128

128 % Add dimensions and sizes nc_create_empty ( newF ileName ) nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'lat' 3 ) nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'lon' 2 ) nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'days' 97880 ) varstruct.Name = 'aPCP' ; varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' 'lon' 'days' }; nc_addvar ( newFileName, varstruct ) lon_varstruct.Name = 'lon' ; lon_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lon_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lon' }; nc_addvar ( newFileName, lon_varstruct ) lat_varstruct.Name = 'lat' ; lat_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lat_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' }; nc_addvar (newFileName, lat_varstruct ) day_varstruct.Name = 'days' ; day_varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; day_varstruct.Dimension = { 'days' }; nc_addvar ( newFileName, day_varstruct ) % Add the subset of data to the new netcdf file nc_varput ( newFileName, 'lat' lat ); nc_varput ( newFileName, 'lon' lon ); nc_varput ( newFileName, 'aPCP' aPCP ); nc_varput ( newFileName, 'days' days ); % Add attributes nc_attput ( newFileName, 'aPCP' 'units' 'kg/m^2' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'aPCP' 'var_desc' '3 hourly precipitation' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'days' 'units' 'matlab serial date' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'units' 'degrees_north' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'long_name' 'Latitude' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'actual_range' '18.83 18.33 f' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lon' 'units' 'degrees_east' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lon' 'long_name' 'Longitude' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lon' 'actual_range' '287.64 287.89 f' );

PAGE 129

129 C3. MATLAB CODE C % Read in 3 h ours temperature files and abstract the daily maximum and minimum temperature % and calculate the daily mean temperautre, and then concatenate into three % single files clear; directory = pwd; % Need to be changed if different path newdir = [directory, '/ processed' ]; cd (newdir) dayPosition =1; % Day 1 is 1/1/1979 %Need to be changed if different grids; [y,x,days] apevap = NaN(3,2,97880); for i=1979:2012 year = int2str(i); fileName = [ 'pevap.HaitiBV.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % abstract data lat = nc_varget(fileName, 'lat' ); % 3 pts currently lon = nc_varget(fileName, 'lon' ); % 2 pts currently time = nc_varget(fileName, 'time' ); % 3 hours time step T3hrs = nc_varget(fileName, 'pevap' ); % Has dimensions: (3,2,time) T3hrs(T3hrs <0)=0; maxTime = max(time); apevap(:,:,dayPosition:dayPosition+maxTime 1) = T3hrs; dayPosition = dayPosition+maxTime; end days = 722816:735050; % Matlab serial dates, 1/1/1979 6/30/2012 days = days'; %% Write to mean temperature file cd (directory); newFileName=( 'pevap_HaitiBV.nc' ); % Add dimensions and sizes nc_create_empty ( newFileName ) nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'lat' 3 )

PAGE 130

130 nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'lon' 2 ) nc_add_dimension ( newFileName, 'days' 9 7880 ) varstruct.Name = 'pevap' ; varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' 'lon' 'days' }; nc_addvar ( newFileName, varstruct ) lon_varstruct.Name = 'lon' ; lon_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lon_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lon' }; nc_addva r ( newFileName, lon_varstruct ) lat_varstruct.Name = 'lat' ; lat_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lat_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' }; nc_addvar (newFileName, lat_varstruct ) day_varstruct.Name = 'days' ; day_varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; day_varstruct.Dime nsion = { 'days' }; nc_addvar ( newFileName, day_varstruct ) % Add the subset of data to the new netcdf file nc_varput ( newFileName, 'lat' lat ); nc_varput ( newFileName, 'lon' lon ); nc_varput ( newFileName, 'pevap' apevap ); % Add attributes nc_a ttput ( newFileName, 'pevap' 'units' 'kg/m^2' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'pevap' 'var_desc' '3 hourly potential evaporation' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'days' 'units' 'matlab serial date' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'units' 'degrees_north' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'long_name' 'Latitude' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lat' 'actual_range' '18.83 18.33 f' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lon' 'units' 'degrees_east' ); nc_attput ( newFileName, 'lon' 'long_name' 'Longitude' ); nc_attpu t ( newFileName, 'lon' 'actual_range' '287.64 287.89 f' );

PAGE 131

131 C4. MATLAB CODE D % This code reads the NARR 3 hours time step precipitation data, access a subset of grid points, and then % creates new netcdf files %% clear all close all dir = pwd; da tatype = 'apcp' ; %extracting 3 hours precipitation data for i=1979:2012 if ((i==1980)||(i==1984)||(i==1988)||(i==1992)||(i==1996)||(i==2000)||(i==2004)||(i==2008)) time = 2928; elseif (i==2012) time = 1456; % This is here since our ftp download only included data to 6/30/2012 else time = 2920; end %% Access NARR data directory = [dir, '/accumulated precipitation 3 hourly' ]; % Need to be changed if different cd (directory) % air = (y, x, time) [349,277,2920] for each nonlead year % ti me = hours since 1/1/1 0:00:00 in 3 hour increments % y = meters (0 to 8959788) at 32463m (mean) increments % x = meters (0 to 11297120) at 32463m (mean) increments % the projection coodinate is Lambert Conformal Format % the sourthwest corner is set as ( 0,0) % y is northward distance from southwest corner of domain in projection coordinates % x is eastward distance from southwest corner of domain in projection coordinates % each grid has its corresponding lon and lat. Corners of this grid are 12.2N; 133.5 W, 54.5N; 152.9W, 57.3N; 49.4W, 14.3N; 65.1W. % degreesEast = (180 degreesWest) + 180 year = int2str(i); fileName = [datatype, '.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % Need to change for other variables

PAGE 132

132 % Create a 0.25 degree lat lon grids to do projection later % N eed to be changed for other grids x = 287.64:0.25:287.89; y = [18.83: 0.25:18.33]'; % Create a year precipitation array maxX = length(x); maxY = length(y); T3hrs = NaN(maxY,maxX,time); for dayi=0:8:time 8 ncid = netcdf.open(fileName, 'NC_NOWRITE' ); %For the temperautre data, the varid is 5 from year 1979 to 2002. The latitude %varid is 0 and the longitude varid is 1. if i>=1979 && i<=2002 thisLat = netcdf.getVar(ncid,0); thisLon = netcdf.getVar(ncid,1); data = double(netcdf.getVar(ncid ,5,[0 0 dayi],[349,277,8])); % Units of K missingValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'missing_value' ); fillValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, '_FillValue' ); % Replace with NaN iMissing = find(data == missingValue); data(iMissing)=nan; iFill = find(data == fil lValue); data(iMissing)=nan; % Apply scale and offset scaleFactor = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'scale_factor' ); addOffset = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'add_offset' ); elseif i>=2003 && i<=2007 thisLat = netcdf.getVar(ncid,0); thisLon = netcdf.getVar(ncid ,1); data = double(netcdf.getVar(ncid,4,[0 0 dayi],[349,277,8])); % Units of K missingValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 4, 'missing_value' ); fillValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 4, '_FillValue' );

PAGE 133

133 % Replace with NaN iMissing = find(data == missingValue); da ta(iMissing)=nan; iFill = find(data == fillValue); data(iMissing)=nan; % Apply scale and offset scaleFactor = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 4, 'scale_factor' ); addOffset = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 4, 'add_offset' ); elseif i>=2008 thisLat = netcdf.getVar(ncid,1); thisLon = netcdf.getVar(ncid,2); data = double(netcdf.getVar(ncid,7,[0 0 dayi],[349,277,8])); % Units of K missingValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'missing_value' ); fillValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, '_FillValue' ); % Replace with NaN iMissing = find( data == missingValue); data(iMissing)=nan; iFill = find(data == fillValue); data(iMissing)=nan; % Apply scale and offset scaleFactor = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'scale_factor' ); addOffset = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'add_offset' ); end data = data*scaleFa ctor; data = data+addOffset; % change data to double data = double(data); %% Close File netcdf.close(ncid); % Convert all negative longitudes to positive iNeg = find(thisLon < 0); thisLon(iNeg) = thisLon(iNeg)* 1; thisLon(iNeg) = (180 thisLon(iNeg)) +180;

PAGE 134

134 % Interpolate to a regular grid so it is easier to just access the points % we want thisLon = double(thisLon); thisLat = double(thisLat); maxTime = size(data,3); data2 = nan(maxY,maxX,maxTime); for j=1:8 % Could do this for all days data2(:,: ,j) = griddata(thisLon,thisLat,data(:,:,j),x,y, 'linear' ); end T3hrs(:,:,dayi+1:dayi+8) = data2; end timeNumber = [1:time]'; %% Create 3 hours precipitation and give it dimensions, dimension sizes, and attributes cd ( 'D: \ Di \ NARR data for Joseph \ processed' ) newfileName = [ 'apcp.HaitiBV.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % Add dimensions and sizes nc_create_empty ( newfileName ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'lat' maxY ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'lon' maxX ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'time' time ) %These attributes are the same as the GFS dataset varstruct.Name = datatype; varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' 'lon' 'time' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, varstruct ) lon_varstruct.Name = 'lat' ; lon_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lon_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, lon_varstruct ) lat_varstruct.Name = 'lon' ; lat_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lat_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lon' }; nc_addvar (newfileName, lat_varstruct ) time_varstruct.Name = 'time' ; time_v arstruct.Nctype = nc_double;

PAGE 135

135 time_varstruct.Dimension = { 'time' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, time_varstruct ) % Add the subset of data to the new netcdf file nc_varput ( newfileName, datatype, T3hrs ); nc_varput ( newfileName, 'lat' y ); nc_varput ( new fileName, 'lon' x ); nc_varput ( newfileName, 'time' timeNumber ); % Add attributes nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'units' 'kg/m^2' ); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, '_FillValue', 32767 s'); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'scale_factor' ,'0.010000 f'); nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'var_desc' '3 hours accumulated potential evaporation' ); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'add_offset', '327.649994 f'); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'missing_value', '32766 s'); nc_attput ( n ewfileName, 'lat' 'units' 'degrees_north' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lat' 'long_name' 'Latitude' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lat' 'actual_range' '18.83 18.33 f' ); % Needs to be changed for different gridpoints nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'un its' 'degrees_east' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'long_name' 'Longitude' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'actual_range' '287.64 287.89 f' ); % Needs to be changed for different gridpoints nc_attput ( newfileName, 'time' 'units' 'hours since 1 1 1 00:00:0.0' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'time' 'steps' '3 hours time step' ); en

PAGE 136

136 C5. MATLAB CODE E % This code reads the NARR 3 hours time step temperature data, access a subset of grid points, and then % creates new netcdf files %% clear all cl ose all dir = pwd; datatype = 'pevap' ; %extracting 3 hours temperature data for i=1979:2004 if ((i==1980)||(i==1984)||(i==1988)||(i==1992)||(i==1996)||(i==2000)||(i==2004)||(i==2008)) time = 2928; elseif (i==2012) time = 1456; % This is her e since our ftp download only included data to 6/30/2012 else time = 2920; end %% Access NARR data directory = [dir, '/accumulated potential evaporation 3 hourly' ]; % Need to be changed if different cd (directory) % air = (y, x, time) [349,277, 2920] for each nonlead year % time = hours since 1/1/1 0:00:00 in 3 hour increments % y = meters (0 to 8959788) at 32463m (mean) increments % x = meters (0 to 11297120) at 32463m (mean) increments % the projection coodinate is Lambert Conformal Format % t he sourthwest corner is set as (0,0) % y is northward distance from southwest corner of domain in projection coordinates % x is eastward distance from southwest corner of domain in projection coordinates % each grid has its corresponding lon and lat. Corne rs of this grid are 12.2N; 133.5W, 54.5N; 152.9W, 57.3N; 49.4W, 14.3N; 65.1W. % degreesEast = (180 degreesWest) + 180 year = int2str(i); fileName = [datatype, '.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % Need to change for other variables

PAGE 137

137 % Create a 0.25 degree lat lon grids to do projection later % Need to be changed for other grids x = 287.64:0.25:287.89; y = [18.83: 0.25:18.33]'; % Create a year temperature array maxX = length(x); maxY = length(y); T3hrs = NaN(maxY,maxX,time); for dayi=0:8:time 8 ncid = netcd f.open(fileName, 'NC_NOWRITE' ); %For the temperautre data, the varid is 5 from year 1979 to 2002. The latitude %varid is 0 and the longitude varid is 1. if i>=1979 && i<=2007 thisLat = netcdf.getVar(ncid,0); thisLon = netcdf.getVar(ncid,1); da ta = double(netcdf.getVar(ncid,5,[0 0 dayi],[349,277,8])); % Units of K missingValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'missing_value' ); fillValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, '_FillValue' ); % Replace with NaN iMissing = find(data == missingValue); data(iMissing) =nan; iFill = find(data == fillValue); data(iMissing)=nan; % Apply scale and offset scaleFactor = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'scale_factor' ); addOffset = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 5, 'add_offset' ); elseif i>=2008 thisLat = netcdf.getVar(ncid,1); thisLon = ne tcdf.getVar(ncid,2); data = double(netcdf.getVar(ncid,7,[0 0 dayi],[349,277,8])); % Units of K missingValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'missing_value' );

PAGE 138

138 fillValue = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, '_FillValue' ); % Replace with NaN iMissing = find(data == miss ingValue); data(iMissing)=nan; iFill = find(data == fillValue); data(iMissing)=nan; % Apply scale and offset scaleFactor = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'scale_factor' ); addOffset = netcdf.getAtt(ncid, 7, 'add_offset' ); end data = data*scaleFactor; data = data+addOffset; % change data to double data = double(data); %% Close File netcdf.close(ncid); % Convert all negative longitudes to positive iNeg = find(thisLon < 0); thisLon(iNeg) = thisLon(iNeg)* 1; thisLon(iNeg) = (180 thisLon(iNeg)) +180; % In terpolate to a regular grid so it is easier to just access the points % we want thisLon = double(thisLon); thisLat = double(thisLat); maxTime = size(data,3); data2 = nan(maxY,maxX,maxTime); for j=1:8 % Could do this for all days data2(:,:,j) = gridda ta(thisLon,thisLat,data(:,:,j),x,y, 'linear' ); end T3hrs(:,:,dayi+1:dayi+8) = data2; end timeNumber = [1:time]';

PAGE 139

13 9 %% Create 3 hours temperature and give it dimensions, dimension sizes, and attributes cd ( 'D: \ Di \ NARR data for Joseph \ processed' ) newfileName = [ 'pevap.HaitiBV.' ,year, '.nc' ]; % Add dimensions and sizes nc_create_empty ( newfileName ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'lat' maxY ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'lon' maxX ) nc_add_dimension ( newfileName, 'time' time ) %These attributes are the same as the GFS dataset varstruct.Name = datatype; varstruct.Nctype = nc_double; varstruct.Dimension = { 'lat' 'lon' 'time' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, varstruct ) lon_varstruct.Name = 'lat' ; lon_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lon_varstru ct.Dimension = { 'lat' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, lon_varstruct ) lat_varstruct.Name = 'lon' ; lat_varstruct.Nctype = nc_float; lat_varstruct.Dimension = { 'lon' }; nc_addvar (newfileName, lat_varstruct ) time_varstruct.Name = 'time' ; time_varstruct.Nc type = nc_double; time_varstruct.Dimension = { 'time' }; nc_addvar ( newfileName, time_varstruct ) % Add the subset of data to the new netcdf file nc_varput ( newfileName, datatype, T3hrs ); nc_varput ( newfileName, 'lat' y ); nc_varput ( newfileName, lon' x ); nc_varput ( newfileName, 'time' timeNumber ); % Add attributes nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'units' 'kg/m^2' ); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, '_FillValue', 32767 s'); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'scale_factor','0.010000 f'); nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'var_desc' '3 hours accumulated potential evaporation' ); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'add_offset', '327.649994 f'); %nc_attput ( newfileName, datatype, 'missing_value', '32766 s');

PAGE 140

140 nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lat' 'units' 'degrees_north' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lat' 'long_name' 'Latitude' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lat' 'actual_range' '18.83 18.33 f' ); % Needs to be changed for different gridpoints nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'units' 'degr ees_east' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'long_name' 'Longitude' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'lon' 'actual_range' '287.64 287.89 f' ); % Needs to be changed for different gridpoints nc_attput ( newfileName, 'time' 'units' 'hours since 1 1 1 00:00: 0.0' ); nc_attput ( newfileName, 'time' 'steps' '3 hours time step' ); end

PAGE 141

141 APPENDIX D PARAMETERS CALCULATIONS B 1058 n 4 Calculated k0 (mean) by Kozenzy Carman equation lower limit upper limit lower K0 upper clay 0.28 0.14 0.269 0.385 0.501 0.055398 0.232449 0.666556 0.177051 0.434106 clayloam 0.36 0.46 0.279 0.39 0.501 0.064107 0.244762 0.666556 Sandy clay loam 0.61 0.945 0.235 0.33 0.425 0.032267 0.12547 0.345177 td 0.428821 3 4.797964 1.28694 3.082204 Srmax 0.31911 0.4495 0.57989 0.13039 0.13039

PAGE 142

142 LIST OF REFERENCES Agroconsult Haiti SA, 2009, Etude des systmes de pro duction agricole et des associations paysannes dans les bassins versants de la rivire la quinte et de la rivire grise, 251 pages Ahuja, L.R., Bruce R.R. Cassel D.K. and Rawls W. J. 1989 Simpler Field Measurement and estimation of Hydraulic conductivit y using effective porosity data. Soil S ci., vol 148, pp. 404 411, A lejandra S P atrick D F rancisco R & H ernan A l. 2008 : Hydrological modelling with SWAT under conditions of limited data availability: evaluation of results from a Chilean case study, Hy drological Sciences Journal, 53:3, 588 601 Ambikadevi, K. M. 2004, Simulation of Evapotranspiration and Rianfall Runoff for the Massachusetts Amherst And erson, M. G., and P. E. K neale 1982, The influence of low angled topography on hillslope soil water convergence and stream discharge, J. Hydrol., 57, 65 80. Bates, B.C., Z.W. Kundzewicz, S. Wu and J.P. Palutikof, Eds., 2008: Climate Change and Water. Technical Paper of the Interg overnmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC Secretariat, Geneva, 210 pp Beven K 1997 Topmodel: A Critique Hydrological Processes, Vol. 11, 10691085 Beven, K ., and. Kirkby M. J 1979 A physically based, variable contributing area model of basin hydrology, Hydrol. Sci. J., 24, 43 69. Beven, K., 1984. Infiltration into a Class of Vertically Non Uniform Soils. Hydrological Sciences Journal 29, 425 434. Beven, K. J. 2001 Rainfall Runoff Modeling: the primer, Wiley Chichester. Beven, KJ. 2000. Rainfall Runoffmo deling: the prim er. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. New York. Beven K, Lamb R, Quinn P, Romanowicz R, Freer J, 1995. TOPMODEL. In: Sing VP (Ed), Computer Models ofWatershed Hydrology. Water Resources Publications, Colorado. pp. 627 668. Brekke, L.D., Kiang, J.E., Olsen, J.R., Pulwarty, R.S., Raff, D.A., Turnipseed, D.P., Webb, R.S., and White, K.D., 2009, Climate change and water resources management A federal perspective: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1331, 65 p. (Also available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1331/ .)

PAGE 143

143 Bois P. juin 2003, Hydraulique des coulements en Rivire, notes de cours, Professor at the University of Grenoble. Buytaert, W., De Bievre, B., Wyseure, G., Deckers, J., 2005. The ef fect of land use changes on the hydrological behaviour of Histic Andosols in south Ecuador. Hydrological Processes 19: 3985 3997 Campling P., Gobin A. Beven K., Feyen J. 2002, Rainfall runoff modelling of a humid tropical catchment: the TOPMODEL approach Hydrol. Pro cess. 16 231 253 (2002) DOI: 10.1002/hyp.341 Cappus, P. (1960) Etude des lois de l'coulement, application au calcul et la prvision des dbits. La Houille Blanche 60,493 520 Chan K., Saltelli A., Tarantola S. 1997 Sensitivity Analysis Of Model Outpu t: Variance Based Methods Make t he Difference Proceedings of the 1997 Winter Simulation Conference ed. S. Andradttir, K. J. Healy, D. H. Withers, and B. L. Nelson Environment Institute European Commission Joint Research Centre TP 272, 21020 Ispra (VA), IT ALY Chow, V.T., 1959 Open channel hydraulics: New York, McGraw Hill Book Co., 680 p. Corral, C., 2004: Desenvolupament d'un model hidrolgic per incorporar informaci del radar meteorolgic. Aplicaci operacional a la conca del riu Bess, Tesi Doctoral, U niversitat Politcnica de Catalunya, 175 pp. Cosby, B.J.,Hornberger G.M., Ginn T.R., and Clapp, R.B., 1984, A statistical exploration of the relationships of soil moisture characteristics to the physical properties of soils: Water Resources Research, v. 20 ,, p. 682 690 Cukier, R. I., Fortuin C. M., Schuler, K. E., Petscheck A. G. and Schailbly, J. H. (1973). Study of the sensitivity of coupled reaction systems to uncertainties in rate coefficients. I Theory. J.Chem. Phys. 59, 3873 3878 Cukier, R. I., Lev ine H. B. and Schuler, K. E., 1978 Nonlinear analysis for multiparameter model systems. J. Comput. Phys. 26, 1 42 Cukier, R. I., Schailbly, J. H., and Schuler, K. E., 1975 Study of the sensitivity of coupled reaction systems to uncertainties in rate coeffic ients. III. Analysis of the approximations. J.Chem. Phys. 63, 1140 1149 Dautrebande, S., Sohier, C. and Brahy, V. 2006. sols agricoles en Rgion Wallonne. Dossier scientifique ralis dans le cadre du rapport analytiq ue 2006 UHAGx Gembloux, 121p

PAGE 144

144 cas du basin versant de la ravine Balan, Haiti. Universit de Moncton 1 48 Dunne, T. and Black, R.D., 1970, An experimental investigation of runoff production in permeable soils, Water Resources Research, 6: 478 490 Durand, P, Robson, A, and Neal, C. 1992 Modelling the hydrology of submediterranean montain catchments (Mont Lozre, France), using TOPMODEL: initial results, J. Hydrol., 139, 1 14 Ekman, E.L. 1926. Botanizing in Haiti. U.S. Naval Med. Bull., 24(1):483 497. Famiglietti, J.S. 1992, Aggregation and scaling of spatially variable hydrological processes Local, catchment scale and macroscale models of water and energy balance: Princeton, Princeton University, October 1992, Ph.D. dissertation, 207 p. Fedak R. 1999 Effect of Spatial Scale on Hydrologic Modeling in a Headwater Catchment, t hesis, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 179 p Georges Y, 2008, Contribution l'valuation de l'rosion dans le bassin versant de la rivire Grise pour un meilleur plan d'amnagement F aculte U niversitai re des S ciences A gronomiques de G emblou x ( FUSAGx ) Mmoire de Master complementaire, 50p Grabs T.; Seibert J ; Bish op K.; Laudon, H., 2009 Modeling spatial patterns of saturated areas: a comparison of the topographic wetness index and a dynamic distribute d model. Journal of Hydrology, 373(1 2):15 23. Graham, D.N. and M. B. Butts 2005 Flexible, integrated watershed modelling with MIKE SHE. In Watershed Models, Eds. V.P. Singh & D.K. Frevert Pages 245 272, CRC Press. ISBN: 0849336090. Gupta, H.V., Sorroshian S and Yapo, P.O (1999) Status of automatic calibration for hydrologic models: comparison with multilevel expert calibration, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, ASCE, Vol. 4, No. 2, 135 143. Haan, C. T. 2002. Statistical Methods in Hydrology 2nd ed. Ames ,Iowa: Iowa State University Press. Hantush M. and Khalin L ., 2003, Modeling Uncertainty of Runoff and Sediment Yield Using a Distributed Hydrologic Model Haygarth P. M., Beven K. J., Joynes A. Butlerb T., Keelera C., Freera J., Owensc P. Wood G. Samplin g for A ssessing Risk to Water Quality,

PAGE 145

145 Hewlett, J. D. and. Hibbert 1967 A. R Factors affecting the response of small watersheds to precipitation in humid areas, in International Symposiumon Forest Hydrology (1965), Penn State University, edited by W. E. S opper and H. W. Lull, pp. 275 290, Pergamon, New York. Hingray, B., Picouet, C. Mus y, A. 2009 Hydrologie. 2. Une Lausanne: Presses Polytechniques Universitaires Romandes. Holdridge, L.R. 1947. The pine forest and adjacent mounta in vegetation of Haiti considered from the standpoint of a new climatic classification of plant formations. Ph.D. Dissertation. Univ. Michigan, Ann Arbor, 186 pp. H olly, G. 1999. Les problmes environnementaux de la Rgion Mtropolitaine de Portau Prince. Commissi on pour la commmoration du 250 e me anniversaire de la fondation de Port a u Prince. Port au Prince, Hati 221p. Hornberger, G M, Beven, K J, Cosby, B J and Sappington, D E. 1985 Shenandoah Watershed Study: Calibration of a Topography Based, Variable Contributing Area Hydrological Model to a Small Forested Catchment, Water Resour. Res. 21; 1841 1850. Horton, RE., 1933. The role of infiltration in the hydrologic cycle, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 14: 446 460. Johnstone D., and Cross W.P. 1949, Elements of Applied Hydrology, Ronald Press Company, New York Joseph A., Mai 200 aux conditions climatiques externes en Hati, secteurs : zones ctires, ressources en eau, risqu es et dsastres, agricultur e et dsertification, 73 pages Judd, W.S. 1987. Floristic study of Morne la Visite and Pic Macaya national par ks Haiti. Bulletin Florida State Museum, 32(1):1 136. Knowles, R. B., Markley, B., Buckalew, J., Roebuck L. W. (1999) Water Resources Assessment of Haiti,40p Lalonde, Girouard, Letendre, and Associes, Ltd. 1977, Ressources Hydrauliques, Hydrogologie Prliminaire de la Plaine de Cul de Sac. Vol. 110, Contract 444/00407, Montreal, Canada: Agence Canadienne de Developpement International, June 1977. L ee G. *, T achikawa Y., T akara K. 2006, Analysis of Hydrologic Model Parameter Characteristics Using Automatic Global Optimization Method Annuals of Disas,Prev. Res. Inst., Kyoto Univ., No. 49 B,

PAGE 146

146 Let tenmaier, D., D. Major, L. Poff, and S. Running, 2008. Water Resources. In: The effects of climate change on agriculture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity in the United States. A Report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Su bcommittee on Global Change Resear ch. Washington, DC., USA, 362 MacFadden, BJ. 1986. Geological setting of Macaya and La Visite National Par k0 southern peninsula of Haiti. Published Report. U.S. Agency for International Development, Haiti, Port au Prince, 33 pp. Marco Franchiniav*, Jacques Wendlingbvl 1996 Physical interpretation and sensitivity analysis of the TOPMODEL Journal of Hydrology 175 293 338 McCuen, R.H., Johnson, P.A., and Ragan, R.M., 2002, "Highway Hydrology," U. S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Hydraulic Design Series No. 2, FHWA NHI 02 001, Second Edition Montesinos Barrios, P., Beven K. 2004, Evaluation of TOPMODEL http://s1004.ok0tate.edu/S1004/Regional Bulletins/Modeling Bulletin/ TOPMODEL.html Moreda F. 1999 Conceptual rainfall runoff models for different time steps with special consideration for semi arid and arid catchments La boratory of Hydrology, F aculty of Applied Sciences, VUB Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium D issertation 208pp Morel Seytoux H. J 1999, Soil water retention and maximum capillary drive from saturation to oven dryness WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 35, N O. 7, PAGES 2031 2041 Morel Seytoux, H.J., Khanji, J., 1974. Derivation of an Equation of Infiltration. Water Resources Research, 10, 795 800. Morgan, M. G., and M. Henrion. 1992. Uncertainty: A Guide to Dealing with Uncertainty in Quantitative Risk and P olicy Analysis. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press Morris M. D. 1991, Factorial Sampling Plans for Preliminary Computational Experiments, Technometrics, vol 33, N0. 2. (May, 1991), pp. 161 174 M uletha, M.K. and Nicklow, J.W. (2005) Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis coupled with automatic calibration for a distributed watershed model, Journal of Hydrology 306, 127 145. Musy, A. 2005 ISTE Ecole Polytechniq ue Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), http://hydram.epfl.ch/e drologie/

PAGE 147

147 Nourani V., Roughani A., Gebremichael M., (2011) Topmodel Capability for Rainfall Runoff Modeling of The Ammameh Watershed At different tim e scales using different terrain algorithms, Journal of Urban and Environmental Engineering, v.5, n.1, p.1 14, ISSN 1982 3932 doi: 10.4090/juee.2011.v5n1.001014 Oliver J.E. and Hidore, J.J., 2002 Climatology, An Atmospheric Science, 2nd edn. Prentice Hall Pan, F., C. D. Peters Lidard, M. J. Sale, and A. W. King (2004), A comparison of geographical information systems based algorithms for computing the TOPMODEL topographic index, Water Resour. Res., 40, W06303, doi:10.1029/2004WR003069. Parsons J. E., Thomas D. l., Huffman R. L, 2004, Agricultural Non Point source water quality Models, Their use and Application. A cooperative publication associated with CSREES and EWRI southern cooperative Series Bulletin # 398 ISBN: 1 58161 398 9 Pinol, J, Beven, K J and Fre er, J, 1997, Modelling the hydrological response of Mediterranean catchments, Prades, Catalonia the use of distributed models as aids to hypothesis formulation Hydrol. 11, 1287 1306 Projet Interuniversitaire Cible (PIC), 2008, Projet Pilote de support de s zones habitables de Port au Prince. Feuille 1 Pernier, 27 pages Quinn, P., K. Beven, P. Chevallier, and O. Planchon, The prediction of hillslope flow paths for distributed hydrological modelling using digital terrain models, Hydrol. Processes, 5, 59 79 1991 Rawls, W.J., and D. L. Brakensiek, A procedure to predict Green Ampt Infiltration Parameters, Adv. Infiltration A. Soc. Agric. Eng., pp. 102 1983. Rawls, W.J., and D. L. Brakensiek, and R. Savaki Estimation of soil properties, Trans. Am. Soc. Agri c. Engrs., vol 25 no. 5, pp. 1316 1330, 1328, 1982 P roperties J. Irrig. Drain. Emg. vol 108, no. IR2, pp. 166 171, 1982 Rawls, W.J., and D. L. Brakensiek, Prediction of Soil Water Properties for hydrologic Modeling, Watershed Management I eighties, ACE, p p. 293 299, 1985 Reed, Seann, Victor Koren, Michael Smith, Ziya Zhang, Fekadu Moreda, Dong Jun 60. Richard L. G. and Dennis A S., 2004 Soil Profile Descriptions f or Steeplands Research Sites i n Haiti Auburn University, Alabama, 36849,5412 U.S.A. United States Agency for International Development, Soil Management Collaborative Research Support Program Auburn University, Technic al Bulletin No. 2004,01

PAGE 148

148 Robson, A J, Whitehead, P G and Johnson, R C. 1993 An application of a physically based semi distributed model to the Balquhidder catchments, J. Hydrol., 145, 357 370 Rodriguez Iturbe, I., and J. B. Valdes (1979), the geomorphic str ucture of Hydrologic response, Wat er Resources., 15(6), 1409 1420 Sa telli, A Tarantola, S., Campolongo F. Ratto, M. ( 2004 ), Sensitivity Analysis in Practice A guide to Assessing Scientific Models Wiley, 133 p Saltelli, A., Chan K., Scott E.M Eds (2000) Sensitivity Analysis. John Wiley and Sons, Siebert, J., Bishop, K. H., and Nybert, L. 1997. `A test of TOPMODEL's ability to predict spatially d istributed groundwater levels', Hydrol. Process., 11, 11311144. Sempere Torres, D, 1990, Calcul de la lame ru issele dans la modlisation plui e dbit: limitations des approches globales et introduction simplifie de la topographie et de la variabilit spatiale des pluies. The se de Doctorat., Institut de Mcanique de Grenoble, France Sergile F., 1998. Environnemen t naturel des bassins versants des rivieres Grise et Blanche. P. 9 40 Shirmohammadi, A., I. Chaubey, R. D. Harmel, D. D. Bosch, R. Munoz Carpena, C. Dharmasri, A. Sexton, M. Arabi, M. L. Wolfe, J. Frankenberger, C. Graff, and T. M. Sohrabi. 2006. Uncertainty in TMDL models. Trans. ASABE 49(4): 1033 1049 Smith, S., E. and Hersey, D. 2008. Analysis of watershed vulnerability to flooding in H aiti.World applied sciences journal 4 (6):869 885 Sobol I. M. 1990a. Sensitivity estimates for nonlinear mathematical models. Matematicheskoe Modelirovanie 2: 112{118 (in Russian). Sobol I. M. 1990b. Quasi Monte Carlo methods. Progress in Nuclear Energy 24: 55 61. Sobol, I.M. Mathematical Modeling and Computation, 1(4):407 414. Smith, Michael B., Dong Jun Seo, Victor I. Koren, Seann M. Reed, Ziya Zhang, Qingyun Duan Fekadu Moreda, Shuzheng C ong 2004b I ntercomparison Project (DMIP): Moti Journal of Hydrology, 298, pp. 4 26 Smucker G. R Bannister M. Heather, Gossin Y. Portnoff M., Timyan J. Tobias S. Toussaint R., April 2007, En vironmental Vulnerabili ty in Haiti, 141 pp Swartley D. B. Toussaint J. R. May 06, Haiti Country Analysis of Tropical Fore stry and Biodiversity, 80 pages

PAGE 149

149 Timyan J. C 2006, Criteria for selecting watershed priority in Haiti, 17 pp Timyan, J. C. 1999. Larg e scale Hillside Re vegetation of the Upper Grise and Blanche River Watersheds. Winrock International, Petion Ville. 44 p Page, T., Haygarth, P.M., Beven, K., Joynes, A., Butler, P., Keeler, C., Freer, J., Owens, P. & Woods, G. 2005. Spatial variability of soil phosphorus in relation to the topographic index and critical source areas: sampling for assessing risk to water quality. Journal of Environmental Quality, 34, 2263 2277 Wallach D., Makowski D. Jones J.W. 2006, W orking with Dynamic Crop Models. Evaluat ion, Analysis, Parameterization, and Applications. Elsevier B. V. 444 pp Wendling, J, 1992, Modlisation pluie dbit: comparaison d'approches conceptuelles/physico dterministes, globales/semi distribues. Essai de prise en compte de la variabilit spatial e des pluies. (Application au bassin versant du Ral Collobrier). Thèse de Doctorat, Institut national polytechnique de Grenoble, France. Wolock, D. M., and C. V. 1994 Price, Effects of digital elevation model map scale and data resolution on a topog raphy based watershed model, Water Resour. Res., 30, 3041 3052, Wolock D. M., 1993,Simulating the variable source area concept of streamflow generation with watershed model TOPMODEL, US Geological Survey, water Resource s Investigations Report 93 4124 Zhan g, W., and D. R. Montgomery, Digital elevation model grid size, landscape representation, and hydrologic simulations, Water Resour. Res., 30, 1019 1028, 1994

PAGE 150

150 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Joseph Beneche was born in Les Coteaux (Damassin) which is in the South of Ha iti. He went to college St Jean des Cayes where he graduated from high school in July 2000. In October of 2000, he moved to Port au Prince and successfully passed the entrance exam at Facult gronomie et de M decine V trinaire (FAMV) of the State Univ agricultural engineering Over approximately the next five (5) years, Joseph worked among 2 private consulting firms and an NGO, holding position ranging from being site engineer to team leader. In July 2010, Joseph obtained a scholarship from USAID / degree in agricultural and biological engineering with a concentration in h ydrologic s ciences in M ay 2013. His skills include water project management, hydrological modeling, computer programing. Joseph wants to be a long life learner in the field of hydrology, work in challenging environments, and give back to his country through the expertise he will have acquired.