Herbivory Rates Across a Latitudinal Gradient using Silica as a Model Physical Plant Defense

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Material Information

Title:
Herbivory Rates Across a Latitudinal Gradient using Silica as a Model Physical Plant Defense
Physical Description:
1 online resource (104 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Callis-Duehl, Kristine L
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Doctorate ( Ph.D.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Botany, Biology
Committee Chair:
LEVEY,DOUGLAS J
Committee Co-Chair:
PALMER,TODD
Committee Members:
BRUNA,EMILIO M,III
MCAUSLANE,HEATHER J

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
defense -- herbivory -- latitude -- silica
Biology -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Botany thesis, Ph.D.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Herbivory plays an important role in shaping the composition of plant communities throughout the world. Insects are one of the most important herbivores and consume between 10% and 40% of the total annual leaf material.  This total herbivory rate is believed to vary from temperate to tropical latitudes.  However, the degree or even the direction of this relationship is highly debated and the supported only by a few conflicting studies. The goal of this study was to assess the rates of herbivory across a latitudinal gradient from Panama to Wisconsin, using silica as a model plant defense.  The researcher predicted that herbivory rates will follow a similar trend to total insect and plant diversity and therefore be higher in tropical than in temperate areas. In order to test this hypothesis, the researcher maintained highly controlled conditions at all three sites along the latitudinal gradient. These conditions included using the same plant species in the cucumber family, controlling soil nutrients and moisture, choosing similar local environments at forest edges.  Additionally, the amount of plant defense was controlled with low, medium and high levels of a physical plant defense, mainly silica.  Controlling the amount of physical plant defenses allows the researcher to look at herbivory rates under different levels of plant defense.  There searchers observed and compared the type and number of herbivorous insects on each of the plants at all location to determine if there is a greater density or diversity of herbivores in lower latitudes and if this variation was tied tot he level of plant tissue consumption. Understanding the pattern of herbivory from tropical to temperate climates has implications for climatic change models and agricultural pest management practices as well as for understanding the evolution of plant defense.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Kristine L Callis-Duehl.
Thesis:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2013.
Local:
Adviser: LEVEY,DOUGLAS J.
Local:
Co-adviser: PALMER,TODD.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2013
System ID:
UFE0045348:00001