Evaluation of Inorganic and Organic Substrates on the Growth of Zamia pumila

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Material Information

Title:
Evaluation of Inorganic and Organic Substrates on the Growth of Zamia pumila
Physical Description:
1 online resource (37 p.)
Language:
english
Creator:
Murphy, Vickie Lynn
Publisher:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.S.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Degree Disciplines:
Horticultural Sciences, Environmental Horticulture
Committee Chair:
Moore, Kimberly A
Committee Members:
Fitzpatrick, George E
Vendrame, Wagner A
Griffith, M

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
conservation -- cycad -- media
Environmental Horticulture -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre:
Horticultural Sciences thesis, M.S.
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
Cycads comprise the most threatened group of plants on earth.  Ex situ cultivation is an essential tool in rare cycad conservation.  Appropriate container media properties, especially excellent aeration, are crucial to successful cultivation of most cycads.  Typical cycad media include substantial portions of organic materials that will decompose over time, reducing aeration.  At Montgomery Botanical Center, the use of novel inorganic media has improved survival and growth of several very rare and challenging Zamia species, suggesting the need for a rigorous evaluation of different inorganic container media. Effects of: 1) silica sand ; 2) Fafard (peat/perlite mix); 3) perlite (expanded volcanic glass); 4) pumice (volcanic rock); 5) Turface (montmorrillinite clay); 6) Profile (calcined clay); 7) a 50%sand: 50% Profile mix; 8) Permatil (calcined slate); or 9) Axis (calcined diatomaceous earth) on growth of Zamia pumila seedlings were evaluated. At transplanting 35 g of Nutricote fertilizer 18N – 6P205 – 8K2O slow release 360 (Florikan E.S.A. Sarasota, FL) was incorporated into the top one inch of all media. Plants were fertilized at the same rate after one year of growth. Plants were watered to point of saturation three times a week. Media physical properties and media nutrient analysis were measured. Nutritional analysis of seedlings was measured at transplanting. Plants were harvested and growth parameters were measured 18 months after planting.   The sand medium produced significantly higher total dry weight and leaf area in Z. pumila than all other substrates. We suspect that lower water holding capacity and higher air filled space of sand, perlite, and pumice contributed to better growth in these substrates. Although Permatil had the lowest water holding capacity, it also had the highest air filled space and this might have been too dry for optimum Zamia growth. Although Fafard had a high water holding capacity, the percentage of larger particles (#10 and #35) was similar to sand. Under conditions similar to this experiment, we would recommend growing Z. pumila in silica sand.
General Note:
In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note:
Includes vita.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2012.
Local:
Adviser: Moore, Kimberly A.
Electronic Access:
RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31
Statement of Responsibility:
by Vickie Lynn Murphy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
UFRGP
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
lcc - LD1780 2012
System ID:
UFE0045057:00001