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Effect of Supplementing Bahiagrass Hay with Warm-Season Legume Hays on Feed Intake, Digestibility, Nitrogen Retention, B...

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Title: Effect of Supplementing Bahiagrass Hay with Warm-Season Legume Hays on Feed Intake, Digestibility, Nitrogen Retention, Body Weight Gain and Parasite Burden of Goat Kids
Physical Description: 1 online resource (123 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Hamie, Joseph Chakana
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bahiagrass -- digestibility -- gastrointestinal -- goats -- intake -- legumes -- nematodes -- nitrogen-retention -- perfomance -- supplementing -- warm-season
Animal Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Animal Sciences thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The study first determined effects of supplementing bahiagrass (Paspalum notatumFlügge; BG) hay with legume hays on feed intake, digestibility, and nitrogen(N) retention. Further, the study examined effects of the diets on goat performance and parasite burden.  Forty Boer × Spanish × Kiko goats weighing 24.3 ± 9.8 kg were dewormed, stratified bybody weight and randomly assigned to diets of bahiagrass hay supplemented without or with (50% of diet dry matter, DM) perennial peanut (Arachis glabrataBenth.) (PEA), soybean Glycine max (L.) Merr. (SOY), cowpea Vignaunguiculata (L.) Walp. (CWP), or sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneataDum.-Cuors. G. don) (LES hay. Diets were fed ad libitum for 16 days of adaptationand 7 days of total urine and feces collection. Goatswere then placed on BG pasture from d 24 to 66 to allow natural infection with H. contortus L3 larvae and coccidianoocysts. Afterd 42 on parasite-infested BG pasture, goats were fed the same diets for 49days. Supplementation with LES and PEA increased (P
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Joseph Chakana Hamie.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2012.
Local: Adviser: Adesogan, Adegbola T.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

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Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2012
System ID: UFE0044957:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0044957/00001

Material Information

Title: Effect of Supplementing Bahiagrass Hay with Warm-Season Legume Hays on Feed Intake, Digestibility, Nitrogen Retention, Body Weight Gain and Parasite Burden of Goat Kids
Physical Description: 1 online resource (123 p.)
Language: english
Creator: Hamie, Joseph Chakana
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2012

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: bahiagrass -- digestibility -- gastrointestinal -- goats -- intake -- legumes -- nematodes -- nitrogen-retention -- perfomance -- supplementing -- warm-season
Animal Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic -- UF
Genre: Animal Sciences thesis, M.S.
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The study first determined effects of supplementing bahiagrass (Paspalum notatumFlügge; BG) hay with legume hays on feed intake, digestibility, and nitrogen(N) retention. Further, the study examined effects of the diets on goat performance and parasite burden.  Forty Boer × Spanish × Kiko goats weighing 24.3 ± 9.8 kg were dewormed, stratified bybody weight and randomly assigned to diets of bahiagrass hay supplemented without or with (50% of diet dry matter, DM) perennial peanut (Arachis glabrataBenth.) (PEA), soybean Glycine max (L.) Merr. (SOY), cowpea Vignaunguiculata (L.) Walp. (CWP), or sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneataDum.-Cuors. G. don) (LES hay. Diets were fed ad libitum for 16 days of adaptationand 7 days of total urine and feces collection. Goatswere then placed on BG pasture from d 24 to 66 to allow natural infection with H. contortus L3 larvae and coccidianoocysts. Afterd 42 on parasite-infested BG pasture, goats were fed the same diets for 49days. Supplementation with LES and PEA increased (P
General Note: In the series University of Florida Digital Collections.
General Note: Includes vita.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The University of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Statement of Responsibility: by Joseph Chakana Hamie.
Thesis: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Florida, 2012.
Local: Adviser: Adesogan, Adegbola T.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO UF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE UNTIL 2014-12-31

Record Information

Source Institution: UFRGP
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: lcc - LD1780 2012
System ID: UFE0044957:00001


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1 EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTING BAHIAGRASS HAY WITH WARM SEASON LEGUME HAYS ON FEED INTAKE, DIGESTIBILITY, NITROGEN RETENTION, BODY WEIGHT GAIN AND PARASITE BURDEN OF GOAT KIDS By JOSEPH CHAKANA HAMIE A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE GRADU ATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2012

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2 2012 J oseph C hakana H amie

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3 To my special Mom and Dad (Anger in e Soko and Benet Mzomera Hamie) for their moral and spiritual support throughout my life and the entire period of my Master of Science ( M.S. ) degree program

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4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida for according me the opportunity to ca rry out the research reported in this thesis with their facilities. My sincere and special thanks and appreciation go to Dr. Adegbola T. Adesogan, my major advisor, for his tireless and sound technical guidance and support throughout the entire research en deavor. I am also grateful to my committee members, Drs. Lynn Sollenberger and Susan Chikagwa Malunga for their assistance with various aspects of my studies. This work and my entire Master of Science ( M.S. ) degree study program would not have been possi ble without the financial support from the U nited S tates A gency for I nternational D evelopment (USAID) Initiative for Long Term Training and Capacity Building (UILTCB) program and the Malawi Government, for which I am very grateful. I also specially thank m y friend indeed, Miguel Urbano Zarate, for his support during the entire study. His time, jokes, games and particularly his unparalleled hard work are highly appreciated. I am also grateful to everyone who rendered their support in one way or another, inc luding Evandro Muniz, Yeonjae Jang, Jan Kivipelto Oscar Queiroz, Juan Jose Romero, Kathy Arriola, Lucas Paranhos, Natalie Forman, and Joseph Sapora, just to mention a few.

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5 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 L IST OF TABLES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 7 L IST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 8 L IST OF A BBREVI A TIONS ................................ ................................ ............................. 9 CHAPTER 1 I NTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 12 2 LITERATURE REVIEW ................................ ................................ .......................... 15 Goat Production and Consumption ................................ ................................ ......... 15 History of Goat Domestication ................................ ................................ .......... 15 Ecological Distribution and Adaptation of Goats ................................ ............... 15 Benefits of Raising Goats ................................ ................................ ................. 16 Goat Production Systems ................................ ................................ ................. 17 Growth of the Uni ted States (US) Goat Industry ................................ ............... 17 Characteristics of Goat Operations in the US ................................ ................... 18 Consumption Preferences and Health Benefits of Goat Meat .......................... 19 Challenges of the US Goat Industry ................................ ................................ 20 Factors Influencing Intake in Ruminant Animals ................................ ..................... 21 Physiological Factors Affecting Feed Intake ................................ ..................... 22 Environmental Factors Affecting Feed Intake ................................ ................... 22 Forage or Feed Availability ................................ ................................ ............... 24 Dietary Factors Affecting Feed Intake ................................ .............................. 25 Gastrointestinal Hormones Affecting Feed Intake ................................ ............ 27 Supplementation of Forage Diets ................................ ................................ ........... 29 Limitations of Warm Season Grass Pastures for Ruminant Animal Production ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 29 Crude Protein Supplementation of Forage Based Diets ................................ ... 30 Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis ................................ ................................ 32 Optimizing Protein Supplementation ................................ ................................ 33 Using Legumes as Protein Supplements ................................ ......................... 34 Effects of Gastrointestinal Nematode In fection on Animal Performance and Health ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 35 Haemonchus contortus Infection in Ruminants ................................ ................ 35 Lifecycle of Haemonchus contortus ................................ ................................ .. 36 Climatic Conditions Favoring the Development of Haemonchus contortus ...... 37 Fecundity of Haemonchus contortus ................................ ................................ 37 Clinical and Pathophysiological Signs of H. contortus Infection ....................... 38 Production and Economic Losses from Haemonchosis ................................ ... 38

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6 Anthelmintic Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes ................................ ......... 39 Monitoring Gastrointestinal Nematodes with the FAMACHA Chart ........................ 40 Challenges Associated with Using the FAMACHA Chart ................................ 42 Immunological Control of Gastrointestinal Nematodes ................................ ........... 43 The Influence of Nutrition on Host Response to Gastrointestinal Nematodes ........ 44 Effects of Condensed Tannins on Nutrient Utilization and Gastrointestinal Nematodes ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 47 Definition, Classes and Distribution of Tannins in Plants ................................ 47 Condensed Tannin Reactivity with Protein and Other Molecules ..................... 49 Nutritional Benefits of Condensed Tannins in Ruminants ................................ 50 Detrimental Effects of Condensed Tannins on Ruminant Nutrition ................... 52 Differences in Response of Ruminants to Condensed Tannins ....................... 54 Condensed Tannins as Sustainable Alternatives to Anthelmintics ................... 55 3 EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTING BAHIAGRASS HAY WITH WARM SEASON LEGUME HAYS ON FEED INTAKE, DIGESTIBILITY, NITROGEN RETENTION, BODY WEIGHT GAIN AND PARASITE BURDEN OF GOAT KIDS ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 58 Materials and Methods ................................ ................................ ............................ 59 Forage Production ................................ ................................ ............................ 59 Animals ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 60 Housing and feeding ................................ ................................ ........................ 61 Sample collection ................................ ................................ ............................. 62 Chemical analysis ................................ ................................ ............................ 63 Statistical Analysis ................................ ................................ ............................ 65 Results and Discussion ................................ ................................ ........................... 66 Intake, digestibility and nitrogen retention ................................ ........................ 67 Ruminal fermentation indices and blood metabolites ................................ ....... 69 Parasite burden ................................ ................................ ................................ 70 Indices of anemia and the immune response ................................ ................... 72 Animal performance and indices of resilience ................................ .................. 73 4 CONCLUSIONS ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 75 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................... 85 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ .......................... 122

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7 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 3 1 Chemical Composition of The Bahiagrass, Perennial Peanut, Sericea Lespedeza, Cowpea and Soybean Hays ................................ ............................ 78 3 2 Effects of Supplementing B ahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Intake of Dry Matter (DMI), Organic Matter (OMI), Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDFI), and Nitrogen (NI) ................................ ................................ ................... 78 3 3 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Digestibility of Dry Matter (DMD), Organic Matter (OMD), Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDFD) and N itrogen (ND) ................................ ................................ ........ 79 3 4 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Nitrogen (N) Balance ................................ ................................ .......................... 79 3 5 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Ruminal Fermentation Indices and Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) and Plasma Glucose (PGlu) Concentrations of Goats ................................ ........................... 80 3 6 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on G astrointestinal (GIN), Eimeria sp. (EIM) Fecal Egg Counts (FEC), Packed Cell Volume, FAMACHA Scores and Haptoglobin Concentration of Goats ........ 81 3 7 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay w ith Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on The Performance of Goats ................................ ................................ ........................ 82 3 8 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (P EA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Indices of Resilience of Goats to Parasitism ................................ ...................... 83

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8 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Figure 3 1 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Haptoglobin Concentrations Means at the Wee k ndicated differed (P < 0.05). Error bars are standard errors ................................ ................................ 84

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9 LIST OF ABBREVIATION S ADF Acid Detergent Fiber ADG Average Daily Gain ADL Acid Detergent Lignin BSc Bachelor of Science BW Body w eight BUN Blood Urea N itrogen CWP Cowpea CCK Cholecystokinin CT Condensed Tannins DARS Department of Agricultural Research Services DMI Dry Matter Intake EAT Effective Ambient Temperature FAMACHA FAffa MAlan CHArt FEC Fecal Egg Count FL Florida GIN Gastro Intestinal Nematodes GH Growth Hormone H hydrogen HT Hydroly z able Tannins Kg kilogram LCFA Long Chain Fatty Acids LES Sericea L espedeza LS Serecea Lespedeza

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10 M.S. Master of Science NASS National Agricultur al Statistics Service NDA National Development Aency NDF Neutral Detergent Fiber NH 3 N Rumen Ammonia nitrogen NY NewYork NRC National Research Council NSC Non Sutructural Carbohydrates PCV Packed Cell Volume PEA Peanut PGlu Plasma Glucose pH power of Hydrogen PUN Plasma Urea Nitrogen RDP Rumen Degradable P rotein SOY Soybean TDN Total Digestible Nutrients THI Temperature Humidity index UILTCB Initiative for Long Term Training and Capacity Building US United States USAID Un ited States Agency for International Development USDA United States Department of Agriculture UV Utra Violet VFI Voluntary Feed Intake

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11 Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Req uirements for the Degree of Master of Science EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTING BAHIAGRASS HAY WITH WARM SEASON LEGUME HAYS ON FEED INTAKE, DIGESTIBILITY, NITROGEN RETENTION, BODY WEIGHT GAIN AND PARASITE BURDEN OF GOAT KIDS By J oseph C hakana H amie December 2012 C hair: Adegbola T. Adesogan Major: Animal Sciences The study first determined effects of supplementing bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flgge; BG) hay with legume hays on feed intake, digestibility, and nitrogen (N) retention. Further, the study examined ef fects of the diets on goat performance and parasite burden. Forty Boer Spanish Kiko goats weighing 24.3 9.8 kg were dewormed, stratified by body weight and randomly assigned to diets of bahiagrass hay supplemented without or with (50% of diet dry mat ter, DM) perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) (PEA), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] (SOY), cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] (CWP), or sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata Dum. Cuors. G. don) (LES] hay. Diets were fed ad libitum for 16 days of adaptation and 7 days of total urine and feces collection. G oats were then placed on BG pasture from d 24 to 66 to allow natural infection with H contortus L3 larvae and coccidian oocysts After d 42 on parasite infested BG pasture, goats were fed the sam e diets for 49 days. Supplementation with LES and PEA increased (P < 0.10) intakes of DM, NDF and CP and N retention. Dry matter intake was increased by LES and PEA (P = 0.01) but ADG was not affected by diet. The LES, SOY and PEA diets reduced gastrointe stinal parasite fecal egg counts by 58.6, 31.0 and 25.3% (P = 0.01, 0.06 and 0.11, respectively).

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12 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Goat ( Capra hircus ) production is rapidly increasing in the United States (US) principally due to high minority or ethnic demand for g oat meat and to a lesser degree, goat milk (Maxey, 1993; Pinkerton et al., 1994). Over 70% of the goats in the US are produced in Texas, the Southeast (Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Florida and Alabama), the Midwest (Oklahoma, Missouri) and California (Solaiman, 2007). Goat farming has potential to produce good economic returns due to high reproductive rates, low cost of breeding stock and the ability of goats to thrive on native pastures (Haenlein, 1992). Bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum Fl gge) is the major pasture grass used by the livestock industry in Florida as well as the Southern Coastal Plains of Georgia and Alabama (Blount et al., 2001). The yield of bahiagrass is normally sufficient to meet intake requirements of most ruminant live stock during the grazing season; however, the quality is insufficient for growing or lactating ruminants due to low dry matter (DM) digestibility and crude protein (CP) concentration (Duble et al., 1971; Johnson et al., 2001; Redmon, 2002). Supplements are often necessary for optimal growth of goats and because protein is usually limiting in grass based diets, protein supplementation usually improves goat production on warm season grasses (Ahmed and Nour, 1997; Ott et al., 2002). However, grain based comme rcial supplements may not be economical for growing and finishing meat goats. This is particularly true in Florida because most grains are imported into the state at significant cost. In addition, feeding these traditionally high starch supplements may le ad to reduced ruminal pH and fiber digestibility (Garces Yepez et al., 1997). Legumes are alternative protein sources to

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13 commercial supplements in ruminant rations and inter seeded grass legume pastures can be used to extend the grazing season and increas e nutrient supply to grazing livestock thereby decreasing feed costs (Leep et al., 2002; Muir, 2002). Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), particularly Haemonchus contortus are one of the most important disease constraints to small ruminant productivity in the world (Over et al., 1992; Perry et al., 2002) and they present the greatest danger to the viability of the goat industry in the southeastern region of the United States (Leite Browning, 2006). Control of GIN in ruminants has largely been based on suppr essive or therapeutic use of drugs combined, where practical, with grazing management strategies (Coop and Kyriazakis, 2001). However, reliance on such treatments has resulted in widespread anthelmintic resistance in goats, sheep and cattle in many areas o f the world (Prichard, 1994; Waller, 1994, 1997). Most parasite genera are resistant to one or more of the broad spectrum anthelmintic drug groups (i.e. the benzimidazoles, the levamisole morantel group and the avermectins) on the market (Van Wyk et al., 1 987; Van Wyk and Malan, 1988; Watson and Hosking, 1990; Waller, 1994). Resistance to such drugs has also been reported in the Southern US (Miller and Craig, 1996; Zajac and Gipson, 2000; Terrill et al., 2001; Mortensen et al., 2003). Therefore, sustainable alternative strategies are needed to reduce the gastrointestinal parasite burden of ruminant livestock in the Southeast. Some recent studies have shown that when fed to goats instead of bahiagrass, sericea lespedeza [ Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours., G. Do n] is an effective dewormer (Min et al., 2004, 2005; Shaik et al., 2004, 2006; Moore et al., 2008; Terrill et al., 2009), which also increased the performance of goats (Min et al., 2003, 2005). However, attempts to grow l espedeza in Florida have been unsu ccessful

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14 (A. Blount, personal communication) and the legume is not recommended for Florida (Newman et al., 2010). This study sought to investigate the potential of using warm season legumes adapted to Florida to reduce the parasite burden of goats and enh ance their performance. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of supplementing bahiagrass (cv. Pensacola) hay with hays of perennial peanut ( Arachis glabrata Benth.), soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.], cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp .], and sericea lespedeza [ Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours., G. Don)] on feed intake, digestibility, N retention, growth performance and reduction of gastrointestinal nematode infestation in goats. A further objective was to examine the effects of the same diets on growth performance, immune response and parasite burden in goats. The hypothesis was that supplementation with these legumes would decrease the parasite burden and increase performance of the goats.

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15 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Goat Production and C onsumption History of Goat Domestication The goat population has increased worldwide during the last three decades and it was estimated at approximately 840 million head in 2008 (Simela and Merkel, 2008). Approximately 95% of goats in the world are meat g oats (Thompson, 2006). Goats were among the earliest animals to be domesticated (Galal, 2005; Melanie et al., 2012). Some authors indicate that the first evidence of goat domestication dates back to 8500 7900 B.C. in the Fertile Crescent region and Zagros Mountains of the Middle East (Taberlet et al., 2008), while others believe the domestication occurred in 10,000 B.C. conditions was possibly one of the reasons they were amon g the first animals domesticated by man for production of meat, milk, skins and fiber (Gall, 1981). Currently, goats are among the most common animals worldwide, and goat meat and milk is highly valued in several parts of the world (Solaiman, 2007). Ecolo gical Distribution and Adaptation of Goats Goats are found in all agro ecological zones from hyper arid to super humid and in the whole range of production systems from intensive smallholder production to very extensive nomadic pastoralist systems (Payne a nd Wilson, 1999), but they are concentrated in the tropics, dry zones and in developing countries (Galal, 2005). Goats exhibit large diversity due to their ability to adapt to different environments and to natural selection under different conditions (Mora nd Fehr et al., 2004). In addition, indigenous goats have developed specific adaptations to survive and be productive

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16 under adverse local, management, and environmental conditions. These adaptations make them thrive in traditional, low external input produ ction systems despite facing problems like climate stress, poor quality feed, seasonal feed and water shortages, endemic disease and parasite challenge (IBC, 2004). Benefits of Raising Goats Goat production is attractive because it requires low initial ca pital and maintenance costs and goats can thrive on marginal land and crop residues. Further, goats produce sufficient milk and meat for subsistence and commercial farming and they can be managed by family labor even when it is by women and children (Peaco ck 2005; Papachristoforou and Markou 2006; Semakula et al. 2010). Goat production offers a viable form of sustainable livestock production, particularly for individuals with limited financial resources, land, or physical abilities (Spencer, 2008). Goats are also popular with small holders because of their relatively efficient conversion of feed into edible high quality meat, milk, and hide (Solaiman, 2007). In addition, they require less land to graze and are easier to handle than larger livestock (Tades se, 2004). Small ruminants are an integral part of livestock production in sub Saharan Africa where they are kept mainly for milk, meat, wool, manure, or as an immediate cash source, as savings or for risk distribution (Kosgey et al. 200 8 ). Goats serve a s a living bank for many farmers and they are closely linked to the social and cultural life of resource poor farmers (Workneh, 2000). They provide security in bad crop years or when crop prices are unfavorable in intensive cropping areas (Ehui et al. 2000 ). They are also prolific, needing only short periods to increase flock sizes after catastrophes or in periods of high prices, thus off take rates can respond rapidly to price increases (Ngategize, 1989). Goats are sometimes managed as part of a multi spec ies grazing

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17 system with cattle and are highly valued for their ability to control noxious plants (Glimp, 1995). Goat Production Systems Goats are raised under intensive or extensive production systems. Most goats are raised on pasture or native range based extensive systems but small intensive or semi intensive flocks are growing in number. Extensive production systems are common in arid and semi arid regions. Brush and grasses are the main sources of nutrients, and large herds of goats generally range over vast areas. Intensive production usually involves smaller herds and much smaller geographical areas. Animal productivity is greater in such systems because of the higher nutritive value of improved pastures and provision of supplementary concentrates (She lton 1992; Pinkerton 1995). In many parts of the world, meat goat production is dependent primarily on using forages to meet nutritional needs of goats for economic reasons. Goats eat all classes of forage but prefer about 60% browse, 20% grasses and le gumes, and 20% forbes (Pinkerton and Pinkerton, 1996). Luginbuhl et al. (1996) reported that meat goats perform well in production systems when management practices match their eating behavior because being natural browsers, they prefer to source at least half of their daily ration from browse or woody plants. Growth of the U nited S tates (US) Goat Industry Although the US goat industry is still in its infancy (Gelaye and Amoah, 1991), meat goat production has become one of the fastest growing livestock ind ustries in the US and has proven to be a profitable enterprise for many farming families (Bowman, 2003). Meat goat production grew at 3 5% from 2005 until 2009 when it declined slightly (USDA National Agricultural Statistics, 2011). The rapid growth was pr incipally due to

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18 high minority or ethnic demand for goat meat, and to a lesser degree, goat milk as well as demand by gourmet restaurants (Maxey, 1993; Pinkerton et al., 1994). High reproductive rates, low costs of breeding stock, and the ability of goats to thrive on native pastures have also made goat farming highly profitable and fueled the growth of the industry (Haenlein, 1992). The majority of the ethnic groups that consume goat meat are from the Mediterranean, Caribbean, Middle East, Southern Europe India, Far East, Africa, Southern Asia, Mexico, South America, and Central America (Solomon 1992). The greatest demand for goat meat in the US is from the eastern US coast, southern California, Michigan Florida and the northwest corridor stretching fro m Washington to Boston (Agricultural Utilization Research Institute, 2001). Most (over 70%) of the goats in the US are produced in the South (Texas), the Southeast (Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Florida and Alabama), the Midwest (Oklahoma, Missouri) and the West (California) (Solaiman, 2007). Characteristics of Goat Operations in the US According to USDA NASS (2011), there were approximately 152,000 goat operations in the US in 2010, and the average herd size of meat goat farms was 20 goat s (USDA NASS, 2011). The total goat inventory in the US on January 1, 2012 was 2.86 million head, (down 4% from 2011), of which 82% were meat goats ( USDA NASS, 2012). Despite significant increases in the domestic harvest, the US is a net importer of goat m eat, and approximately 98% of the imported goat meat originates from New Zealand and Australia (USDA FAS, 2004). Nevertheless, surveys revealed that ethnic minority consumers were willing to spend more for domestically produced chevon

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19 instead of purchasin g imports of frozen goat carcasses from other countries ( Agricultural Utilization Research Institute 2001). Sande et al. (2005) reported that with the exception of the South African Boer and New Zealand Kiko, there is no consensus on a meat goat breed in the U S Several other breeds, such as the Spanish, Myotonic (Tennessee fainting goat ), Nubian and Pygmy have been used for meat production in the U S (Luginbuhl 1998, 2000; Melan i e et al., 2012). However, the three dominant breeds of meat goats in the US are the Boer, which originated in South Africa, the Kiko, which was developed from native goats of New Zealand, and the Spanish, which was developed from feral goats originally introduced by the Spanish explorers and settlers in Texas and the southwest US (Shelton, 1990). Seventy percent of meat goat owners produce Boer goats, 43% have Spanish goats and 15% have Kiko goats. The Boer, Spanish, Kiko, Myotonic, Savannah breeds, or any of these breed combinations are ideal meat producers (Spencer, 2008). Con sumption Preferences and Health Benefits of Goat Meat product in the world (Agriculture Alterna tives, 2000; Tradex AgriSystems, 2009). It is often served in specialty dishe s centered on festival or holiday events (Sande et al., 2005). It is particularly widely eaten in Asia, Africa, and the Far East (Devendra, 1990) with a production rate of 3.7 million tons in 2001 (Dubeuf et al., 2003). Food preferences vary between natio nalities, cultures, and religious and ethnic groups. In the US, although chevon offers consumers tasty, lower fat meat than beef or pork, goat consumption is not widespread (Getz 1998). The low consumption rate may be related to the unfamiliarity of goat meat and its intense inherent aroma and flavor

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20 (Rhee et al., 2003). Despite the unique flavor and palatability, chevon is a more healthy meat compared to other red meats (Sandes et al., 2005) as it is leaner and has less saturated fat and lower saturated t o unsaturated fatty acid ratios than lamb (Sheridan et al., 2003). Chevon is also lower in fat, cholesterol and saturated fats but higher in protein and iron compared to beef, pork, mutton and poultry (USDA, 1989; Gelaye and Amoah 1991; Johnson, 1995; Sand e et al., 2005). Challenges of the US Goat Industry Despite the high demand for goat meat, there are several challenges facing the US goat industry. The primary constraint s to goat production in the US are production and economic losses due to infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), particularly the blood feeder Haemonchus contortus (Miller and Craig 1996) as well as the development of widespread anthelmintic resistance (Zajac and Gipson, 2000; Terrill et al., 2001; Mortensen et al., 2003; Kapla n et al., 2007). An additional constraint is the lack of a well established regional or national marketing infrastructure by which goats are distributed from the farm to the consumer. Rather, most goats in the US are sold through livestock auctions or dire ctly from the farm where backyard slaughtering is a common practice (McKenzie Jakes, 2007). Other factors that have slowed the growth of the goat industry include: 1) competition from beef sales, 2) seasonality of demand for goat meat, 3) high marketing co sts, 4) long distances between wholesalers and processors, 5) erratic carcass quality, 6) commercial trade resistance, 7) negative consumer attitudes regarding goat meat, and 8) competition from foreign imports (Pinkerton et al., 1991; 2005).

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21 Factors Influ encing Intake in Ruminant Animals Feed intake is one of the most important factors affecting the productivity of ruminant animals. If voluntary intake is too low, the rate of production will decrease, resulting in requirements for maintenance becoming a ve ry large proportion of the metabolizable energy consumed and thus giving a poor efficiency of feed conversion (Forbes, 1995). Factors that regulate dry matter intake (DMI) in ruminants are complex and not understood fully. Nevertheless, accurate estimates of feed intake are vital to predicting the rate of gain and to the application of equations for predicting nutrient requirements of ruminants (National Research Council, 1987). Three types of factors affecting feed intake of ruminants can be distinguished: factors that have to do with the animals, the feed characteristics and environmental factors such as ambient temperature and photoperiod (Ingvartsen et al., 1992; Mertens, 1994; McDonald et al., 1995). In addition, management treatments such as administra tion of exogenous intake potential. Intake is influenced primarily by hunger, which is distressing, and by satiety, which is generally pleasurable (Forbes, 1995). Regulatio n of feed intake and dietary choices combine short term control of feeding behavior related to homeostatic regulation of the body and long term controls that depend on nutritional requirements and body reserves (Faverdin et al., 1995). Recent studies indic ate that to compare intake levels across forages and animal species, the DMI units should be expressed as a percentage of body weight (Sauvant et al., 2006; Decruyenaere et al., 2009). A detailed list of the factors affecting feed intake in a structured fo rmat is presented in

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22 Mertens, ( 1994 ) The intent in this section is not to give a detailed review of all the factors affecting intake but to emphasize some. Physiological Factors Affecting Feed Intake eed, species, sex, size, body composition, health, and physiological state. Huge variations in intake levels occur between breeds or individuals within a given breed (Sco t t and Provenza. 1999). Lactating dairy or suckler cows with higher energy requirement s graze more selectively (selecting more bites on green grasses) and more intensively (expressing longer grazing periods) than dry cows (Gibb et al., 1999). Heat stress reduced dry matter intake (DMI) by 22% in multiparous cows versus 6% in primiparous cow s and the difference was attributed to the small body size and lower metabolic rate in primiparous cows (Igono et al., 1985). Lactating animals can increase feed intake by 35 to 50% compared with non lactating animals of the same body weight when fed the s ame diet (Agricultural Research Council, 1980). Environmental Factors Affecting Feed Intake Animal environment is a broad term, which includes both physical and biological components (Gates, 1968). Gwazdauskas (1985) indicated that an external factor havi ng a positive or negative impact on growth, lactation, or reproduction is generally temper ature, contaminants, physiological restraint and management systems. However, of all these factors, environmental heat stress is the most detrimental to the DMI of dairy cattle (Bernabucci et al., 1999). A negative correlation ( 0.63) has been reported

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23 bet ween temperature Humidity Index (THI) and DMI (Johnson et al., 1963). Holter et al. (1997) reported a reduction in DMI in Jersey cows when minimum THI exceeded 56 and the response continued until the THI was 72. At temperatures greater than 25 o C, ruminan ts decrease the time spent grazing and they adapt their diurnal grazing behavior to avoid the warmest periods of the day (Baumont et al., 2000). However, Conrad (1985) noted that the extent to which DMI is reduced due to heat stress varies. At temperatures of 15 25 o C, normal feed intake occurs whereas temperatures between 25 35 o C cause noticeable (3 to 10%) reduction in feed intake. Feed intake increases as temperatures falls below the thermoneutral zone. Shijimaya et al. (1986) reported that dairy cattle housed in cold barns in which the daily mean temperatures were 5.5 to 1.5 o C had higher DMI than cattle housed in warm barns with daily mean temperatures of 8.2 to 11.2 o C. Similarly, Koknaroglu et al. (2005a) found that cattle fed in the cold season had higher DMI than in other seasons. Demircan et al. (2007) indicated that in cold environments with ambient temperature below the lower critical temperature for beef cattle, the animals increase their energy intake to maintain proper function of the body bec ause of the increase in metabolic heat production. The increase in energy requirements and energy intake is meant to compensate for greater heat loss due to falling ambient temperature, which resultantly increases appetite and feed intake (Demircan et al., 2007). However, a disruption in feed intake behavior is observed at extremely low ambient temperatures (Forbes, 19 9 6; Young, 1988).

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24 Photoperiod has also been reported to affect DMI in ruminants. For example, exposure of lactating cows to longer photoperi ods (16 to 18 hours of light each day) increased DMI compared with those exposed to shorter photoperiods (Dahl et al., 2000; Dahl and Petitclerc, 2003 as cited by Dahl, 2006). Forage or Feed Availability The primary nutritional factor controlling anima l production is the quantity of feed that the animal eats each day when excess feed is offered i.e. voluntary feed intake of diets offered for ad libitum intake (Minson and Wilson, 1994). With grazing cattle, the quantity of forage available can affect f eed intake. The authors of the National Research Council (1987) report reviewed data summarized by Rayburn (1986) and concluded that grazed forage intake was maximized when forage availability was approximately 2,250 kg DM/ha or with a forage allowance of 40 g organic matter(OM)/kg BW. Intake decreased rapidly to 60% of the maximum when forage allowance was 20 g OM/kg BW (450 kg/ha; National Research Council, 1987). However, Minson ( 1990) noted that bodyweight gain by sheep wa s related more closely to gree n (growing) forage allowance than to total forage DM offered. Similarly, Bird et al. (1989) reported that body weight gain by grazing cattle could be modeled more effectively from green pasture mass than from total pasture mass. This is because selective g razing of growing forage may increase in pastures with both growing and senescent material. Cattle eat only small amounts of senescent forage when growing forage is available (Minson, 1990). Hence, effects of forage availability on intake should also accou nt for pasture composition due to the potential for selective grazing.

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25 Dietary Factors Affecting Feed Intake Crude protein concentration Several authors have noted that intake is often depressed when the crude protein (CP) content of a diet is below 60 to 80 g/kg of DM (Blaxter and Wilson, 196 3 ; Minson and Minford, 1967). Low quality tropical forages may have CP concentrations lower than 70 g/kg of DM, which is considered the critical threshold for adequate microbial growth on the fibrous carbohydrates of such basal forages (Lazzarini et al. 2009 ). Consequently, the DMI of tropical forages can be limited by their low CP concentrations. It is no surprise that when diets low in protein relative to energy are fed to animals with high protein requirements suc h as rapidly growing young animals or lactating females, intake is limited by protein deficiency (Moore et al., 1999). Supplementation of forages containing low CP concentrations increases forage intake (Paterson et al., 1994) due to increased degradation of potentially degradable fiber (Lazzarini et al. 2009) as well as faster rate of passage of legumes when the supplemental CP is from legumes (Bowman et al., 1991). The increase in forage degradation is largely due to increased supply of N for growth of r uminal microbes that digest the forage (Russell et al., 1990; Van Soest, 1994). Positive forage intake responses to supplemental protein are most common when forage CP concentration is less than 6 to 8% (NRC, 1987). However, supplementation of low CP diet s can either improve intake of a basal diet (Pathirana and rskov, 1995; Abdulrazak et al., 1997) or reduce intake (Getachew et al., 1994), depending on the relative quality of the basal diet and the supplementary feeds.

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26 Plant cell wall concentration Ruminants consuming diets high in cell wall concentration often are unable to eat sufficient quantities to meet their energy demands (Jung and Allen, 1995) resulting in reduced performance or loss of wei ght (Burns et al., 1994). Allen (1996) reported that voluntary DMI of forage based diets by ruminants is limited by digesta flow, rate of digestion and digestive tract capacity. Others have noted that intake is limited when animals are fed diets that are high in bulk fill and low in available energy concent ration (Balch and Campling, 1962; Campling, 1970; Bines, 1971; Baile and Forbes, 1974; Mertens, 1994). Fiber has been related to the filling properties of feeds because it ferments and passes from the reticulorumen more slowly than the non fiber constit uents (Jung and Allen, 1995). Van Soest (1965) found that acid (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fractions were negatively correlated to voluntary DMI of sheep consuming all forage diets and that NDF was more highly correlated to voluntary DMI (r = 0.65) than was ADF (r = 0.53) across grasses and legumes. Likewise, Waldo (1986) concluded that the NDF concentration of forage is the best single chemical predictor of voluntary DMI. Mertens (1973) reported that voluntary DMI was related to forage NDF co ncentration as follows: VDMI (g/BW0.75/d) = 128.8 1.09 NDF (g/100 g of DM) for 126 grasses and 61 legumes fed to sheep (r 2 = 0.58). Jung and Allen ( 1995) noted that for nutritional studies and general descriptions of forage quality, NDF is an adequate ch aracterization of the plant material. The value of NDF for characterizing the quality potential of C4 grasses, however, is less clear. The cell walls of forage diets may also affect DMI via their effects on digestion. Lignin is recognized as the major comp onent of the cell wall that limits digestion of the

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27 wall polysaccharides in the rumen (Jung and Deetz, 1993). Therefore, forages with low NDF digestibility because of high lignin concentrations may also limit DMI. Fat concentration and type Excess fat inta ke depresses DM digestibility (Palmquist and Jenkins, 1980) and DMI (Choi and Palmquist, 1996; Schauff and Clark, 1992) of lactating cows because fat can inhibit fiber digestion in the reticulorumen (Palmquist and Jenkins, 1980). In addition, it has long b een recognized that fat is a potent stimulator of cholecystokinin (CCK) release (Liddle et al., 1985), which contributes to satiety (Reidelberger, 1994). Feeding high fat diets increased plasma CCK in lactating cows (Choi and Palmquist, 1996) and infusion of unsaturated long chain fatty acids (LCFA) inhibited motility of the reticulorumen in sheep (Nicholson and Omer, 1983). The reduction in rate of digesta passage by supplemental fat could also increase distension and stimulation of tension receptors in th e reticulorumen, possibly reducing DMI (Allen, 2000). Brooks et al. (1954) also reported that feeding excessive unsaturated fatty acids exerts toxic effects on ruminal microbes, which lead to depressed fiber digestion. The type of fat has an effect on the extent to which DMI is affected, with unsaturated fats depressing DMI to a greater extent than saturated fats (Allen, 2000). In a review of several studies, Allen (2000) reported that there was a linear decline in DMI due to fat supplementation in dairy c ow diets such that for every 1% increase in inclusion of tallow or Ca salts of fatty acids in the diet there was a reduction of DMI of 1.2 and 2.5%, respectively. Gastrointestinal Hormones Affecting Feed Intake Several hormonal and paracrine signals ar e secreted from endocrine cells lining the gastrointestinal tract in response to the physiochemical properties of ingested food

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28 passing along the lumen. The secreted hormones activate the vagus nerves, which in turn stimulate cells in the brainstem, elicit ing reflexes that control GI function and send signals to other brain areas that cause the individual to stop eating (Rinaman et al., 1995; Moran et al., 2001, 2004). The long term regulation of energy homeostasis and maintenance of a stable body weight a re achieved through effective integration of signals indicating body fat stores, such as those given by insulin and leptin, with signals indicating immediately available energy or what is available from recently ingested food (Woods et al., 1998, 2000; Sch wartz et al., 2000). The short term meal related signals, such as those given by cholecystokinin ( CCK ) are effective in maintaining appropriate meal size such that the daily regulation of energy intake is well coordinated with energy usage and long term bo dy weight (Seeley and Woods, 2003; Woods, 2004). Following its release, CCK elicits multiple effects on the gastrointestinal system, including the regulation of gut motility, contraction of the gall bladder, pancreatic enzyme secretion, gastric emptying an d gastric acid secretion (Grider, 1994; Schwartz et al., 1997). Similarly, glucagon like peptide 1 inhibits gastrointestinal motility, reduces gastrointestinal secretions, and attenuates gastric emptying. It is thought to be a major of nutrients through the course of the gastrointestinal tract (Nauck et al., 1997; Giralt and Vergara. 1999). The ability of circulating gastric leptin to reduce food intake and body weight is well known and several reviews on the subject exist (Ahima et al., 1996; Woods, 1998; Elmquist et al., 1999; Schwartz et al., 2000; Seeley and Woods, 2003). Ghrelin is the first identified circulating hormone that promotes feeding following systemic

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29 ad ministration (Hiroshi et al., 2002). Predominantly produced by the stomach, ghrelin stimulates secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administrated peripherally or centrally (Arvat, et al., 2000; Peino, et al., 2000; Takay a, et al., 2000). Ghrelin activates neuropeptide Y and agouti related protein producing neurons localized in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (Asakawa, et al., 2001; Kamegai, et al., 2001), which is one of the brain regions of primary importance in the regulation of feeding. Ghrelin has been linked to the anticipatory aspects of meal ingestion because levels peak shortly before scheduled meals in humans and rats and fall shortly after meals end (Cummings et al., 2001). Supplementation of Forage Di ets Limitations of Warm Season Grass Pastures for Ruminant Animal Production In Florida and much of the southern U S bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum Flgge) and bermudagrass [ Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. ] are the main pasture forages (Gates et al., 2001). T he nutritive value of bahiagrass varies with the duration of the regrowth period after cutting or grazing, but average values of 8.3% CP, 50% DM digestibility, and 44.2% ADF are typical (Moore et al., 1991; Redmon, 2002). The digestibility and CP concentra tion of these forages decline as they mature and they become dormant in the fall. Consequently, the quantity as well as the quality of these forages is insufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of growing and lactating cattle in mid to late fall (Dubl e et al., 1971; Williams and Hammond, 1999; Johnson et al., 2001). Others have noted that forages alone are often insufficient to meet the nutrient requirements and exploit the genetic potential of grazing ruminants because of seasonal oscillations in nutr ient concentrations and herbage mass (Galyean and Goetsch, 1993; Owens et al., 1993; Moore et al., 1999). Low quality tropical/subtropical forages may have CP

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30 concentrations lower than 70 g/kg of dry matter, which is considered to be the critical threshold for adequate microbial growth on fibrous basal forage (Moore et al., 1999; Lazzarini et al. 2009). This deficiency implies poor utilization of potentially degradable cell walls by ruminal microorganisms and decreases both intake and animal performance (Pa ulino et al. 2008). The low digestibility and high concentration of cell walls in such forages also limit energy availability to animals fed high forage diets. Recycling of N can supply N for ruminal microbial growth when forage or dietary N is limiting ( Van Soest, 1994). However, when recycled N makes up a large proportion of the total supply of rumen degradable protein, the long term protein needs of the animal may be underestimated, resulting in decreased performance (NRC, 1985). Therefore, dietary prot ein supplements are needed to enhance the long term productivity of ruminants fed forages with low CP concentrations. Crude Protein Supplementation of Forage Based Diets Protein supplementation is often necessary for optimal growth of ruminants grazing w arm season pastures or poor quality forages (Ahmed and Nour, 1997; Ott et al., 2002). Datta et al. (1998) reported that dietary CP supplementation of a basal oat ( Avena sativa ) straw based diet increased rumen fluid ammonia N concentration, feed intake, a nd live weight gain in sheep (Datta et al., 1998). In addition, CP supplementation increased packed cell volume, eosinophil counts and antibody responses to H. contortus L3 antigen and decreased fecal worm egg counts in the sheep. Foster et al. (2009) repo rted that supplementation with soybean meal [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.], perennial peanut [ Arachis glabrata Benth), annual peanut [ Arachis hypogaea (L.)], and cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] hay increased intake of DM, OM, and N, N digestibility and ret ention, and concentration of ruminal ammonia N (NH 3

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31 N) when supplemented to bahiagrass hay. Moore et al. (1999) analyzed a database of 66 publications on 126 forages (73 harvested and 53 grazed) and a total of 444 comparisons between a control, unsupplemen ted and supplemented treatments. They stated that 202 comparisons reported increased forage digestibility while 258 publications reported increased voluntary intake with supplementation. They also noted that the greatest increases in gain were with improv ed forages, supplements with greater than 60% TDN, and supplemental CP intake greater than 0.05% of body weight. In addition, supplements increased voluntary forage intake when the forage TDN:CP ratio was > 7, indicating a N deficit. Factors affecting t he outcome of protein supplementation include the protein concentration of the basal forage, the amount, type (true protein versus non protein N) and ruminal degradability of the protein, the amount and fermentability of the energy supplied, the physiologi cal state of the animal, the protein to sulfur ratio (Hunter, 1991), and the adequacy of other nutrients in the diet. Positive responses to supplemental protein are usually observed when the CP concentration of the basal forage is less than 6 to 8% (Campl ing, 1970; Kartchner, 1981). Paterson et al. (1994) reported that with forages containing low protein concentrations (<7 % CP), a major positive response to protein supplementation occurs due to satisfying minimal ruminal microbiological requirements for N and possibly by providing specific amino acids and or carbon chains. Protein supplements often have little effect on feed intake of cattle consuming forages with CP concentrations above approximately 6% (Mathis et al., 2000) but the critical limit may be greater in growing goats whose minimum dietary protein requirement for maintenance is 6.0 to 8.5% depending on age and type (Fernandes et

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32 al., 2007; NRC 2007). In some cases, protein supplementation of low quality forages may not increase animal performan ce if the resulting increase in total diet consumption Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis Proteins reaching the small intestine of the ruminant are derived from three sourc es: (a) dietary protein which has escaped breakdown by rumen microbes; (b) protein contained in bacterial and protozoal cells which flow out of the rumen (microbial protein) and (c) endogenous proteins contained in sloughed cells and secretions into the ab omasum and intestine (Cheeke, 2005). Microbial protein is a consistent (Schwab, 1996) high quality protein source with a balanced amino acid profile (Clark et al., 1992) and it is relatively less expensive to produce compared to other protein sources. Ther efore, optimizing microbial protein synthesis should increase the efficiency of N utilization and reduce N urinary excretion, which constitutes a major source of N pollution from livestock farms. Factors that influence ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis include the amount and type of supplemental protein, carbohydrate sources and availability in the rumen, and ruminal pH (Bateman et al., 1999). Dietary rumen degradable protein is converted mainly to ammonia in the rumen where it is the p rincipal starting substrate for microbial protein synthesis. Bryant and Robinson (1963) found that 92% of ruminal bacterial isolates could utilize ammonia as the main source of N. This is also supported by Russell et al. (1992) who reported that cellulolyt ic bacterial utilize ammonia as the primary N source. Nolan (1975) and Leng and Nolan (1984) reported that 50% or more of microbial N is derived from ammonia and the rest is from peptides and amino acids. More recent work suggests that the minimum contrib ution to microbial N from ammonia

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33 is 26% when high concentrations of peptides and amino acids are present but it increases to a potential maximum of 100% when ammonia is the sole N source ( Wallace 1997 ). An adequate rumen ammonia concentration is a prereq uisite for optimal ruminant microbial growth and fermentation and for maximal flow of microbial amino acid to the small intestine (Datta et al., 1998). The in vitro rumen fermenter studies of Satter and Slyter (1974) showed that microbial protein yield was limited at rumen ammonia concentrations of 2 mg/dL and maximized at 5 mg/dL. However, in vivo studies showed that microbial protein production was not maximized until rumen ammonia reached 10 (Hume et al. 1970) or 29 mg/dL (Miller 1973). Broderick (200 7) explained that the relatively low ammonia levels required by ruminal organisms in the in vitro studies might be because they used soluble substrates, whereas greater concentrations are required in situ and in vivo, particularly when bacteria are associa ted with particulate substrates with very low ammonia concentrations in such niches (Oldle and Schaefer, 1987). Optimizing Protein Supplementation In ruminants, the conversion of dietary N into edible protein products such as meat and milk is very low (2 0 30%), with the majority of dietary N (70 80%) being excreted in feces and urine. Microbial fermentation of N can result in inordinately high amounts of ammonia. When rapidly degraded energy sources are available, NH 3 as well as amino acids and peptides i n the rumen stimulate microbial growth rate and yield of microbial protein (Russell et al. 1983; Chen et al. 1987; Argyle and Baldwin 1989; Cruz Soto et al. 1994). However, if the RDP supply is high or if inadequate fermentable carbohydrates are availab le, excess NH 3 N that is not utilized for microbial growth flows out of the rumen or is absorbed through the rumen wall and transported via the portal

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34 vein to the liver (Van Soest, 1994). In the liver, absorbed NH 3 N is converted to urea via the urea cycle and is either recycled through the blood and saliva back to the rumen (rskov, 1992; Van Soest, 1994) or is excreted via the kidneys into urine. Urine N excretion represents a waste of ingested N and contributes to environmental pollution through leachin g of N, degradation of downstream water quality and eutrophication of coastal marine ecosystems, development of photochemical smog, and increased emissions of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas (Vitousek et al., 1997). Ruminants consuming excess rum en degradable protein can suffer malaise and decrease intake as a result of high levels of ammonia in the blood (Prins and Beekman 1989). This is because when ammonia absorbed in the rumen exceeds the capacity of the liver to convert it into urea, it pass es into the peripheral circulation where excessive ammonia is toxic (Chalupa et al. 1970, Prior et al. 1970, Femandez et al. 1990, Schelcher et al. 1992). Therefore, strategic protein supplementation aims to optimize the level and efficiency of microbi al protein synthesis in order to increase animal performance and to prevent ammonia toxicity and reduce urinary N excretion and the attendant environmental problems. Using Legumes as Protein Supplements Legumes are often more digestible than warm season grasses because they contain lower structural carbohydrate concentrations as well as greater CP and non structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations (Ball et al., 2002). Consequently, legumes can be used as alternative protein sources to commercial supplem ents in ruminant rations. Supplementary legumes can be of particular value in providing CP to small ruminants when low quality roughages are offered (Goodchild and McMeniman, 1994). Most of the protein in forage legumes is in the form of rumen degradable p rotein, which

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35 can be rapidly converted to NH 3 N in the rumen (Broderick, 1995). Therefore, dietary intake of legumes often stimulates ruminal microbial growth and thus increases the supply of microbial protein to the small intestine (Mupwanga et al., 2000a ). Legume supplementation can also improve N retention by the ruminant when grass diets are fed that do not meet ruminant energy and N requirements (Mosi and Butterworth, 1985; Matizha et al., 1997). Effects of Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection on Anim al Performance and Health Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites are one of the most important disease constraints to small ruminant productivity in tropical and temperate regions of the world (Over et al., 1992; Perry et al., 2002). These parasites pr esent the greatest danger to the goat industry in the southeastern US (Leite Browning, 2006), where the warm, moist climatic conditions are ideal for growth of GIN larvae on pasture (Miller, 1996). Some of the main parasites of veterinary importance in s mall ruminants belong to the phylum Nemathelminthes (roundworms or nematodes), which include the following superfamilies: Trichostrongyloidea, Strongyloidea, Metastrongyloidea, Ancylostomatoidea, Rhabditoidea, Trichuroidea, Filarioidea, Oxyuroidea, Ascarid oidea and Spiruroidea (Sissay, 2007). However, the GIN of greatest importance in small ruminants are members of the order Strongylida which contains Trichostrongyloidea, Strongyloidea, Metastrongyloidea and Ancylostomatoidea but most of them belong to th e Trichostrongyloidea superfamily. Haemonchus contortus Infection in Ruminants Haemonchosis is a predominant, highly pathogenic and economically important disease of sheep, deer and goats caused by Haemonchus contortus (Mortensen et al., 2003). Haemonch us contortus was first described in 1803 by Karl Rudolphi (Soulsby,

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36 worm. This blood sucking abomasal nematode parasite of sheep and goats belongs to the superfamily Trichostr ongyloidea (Urquhart et al., 1996). It is the single most important nematode pathogen of small ruminants in the developing world (Perry et al., 2002). Fourteen types of morphologically diverse Haemonchus contortus females have been described (Roberts et a l., 1854; Chitwood, 1957). Based on vulvar morphology, Chitwood (1957) grouped the female types int o those with a) a linguiform process, b) a knoblike projection, and c) no vulvar projections, and suggested that females with the linguiform process and thos e without projections are the basic types whereas females with the knoblike projection are their hybrids. Lifecycle of Haemonchus contortus Haemonchus and all other economically important Strongyloidae parasites of small ruminants have direct life cycles t hat require no intermediate hosts (Sissay, 2007). According to Sissay (2007), the mature worms breed inside the host and lay eggs which pass through the host and are shed in the feces. Eggs then hatch into first stage larvae (L1) and moult into second stag e larvae (L2) under appropriate temperature and humidity. The larvae feed on bacteria but need moisture to develop and move. The second stage larvae (L2) moult into infective larvae (L3), which migrate out of the feces and up blades of grass where they are ingested by grazing ruminants. Following ingestion of L3 larvae, the worm burrows into the mucosal layer of the stomach and moults into fourth stage larvae (L4) within 2 3 days, and subsequently into adult parasites after 10 14 days (Soulsby, 1982; Hale, 2006; Coffey et al., 2007). Adult worms attach to the abomasal wall and penetrate the mucus membrane into blood capillaries to

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37 ingest blood (Soulsby, 1965). The life cycle takes about 17 to 21 days. Each developmental stage of H. contortus may be considere d a separate organism due to differences in behavior, environmental niche and the stage specific antigens produced (Balic et al., 2000a, b). The successful transmission however is dependent on the prevailing environmental conditions (Veglia, 1915). Climati c Conditions Favoring the Development of Haemonchus contortus Haemonchus contortus is frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions where the conditions for its survival are optimal. However, the parasite has also become a growing problem in temper ate regions (Waller et al., 2004). High humidity, at least in the microclimate surrounding the feces and the herbage, is essential for larval development and survival. A mean monthly temperature of 18C and a minimum monthly rainfall of 50 mm (Gordon, 194 8) are the lower environmental limits for development of the egg to the L3 stage, whereas optimal conditions are a temperature of 28C with humidity greater than 70% (Rossanigo and Gruner, 1995). Silverman and Campbell (1959) observed that there is little or no development of eggs to larvae at temperatures below 9C (Silverman and Campbell, 1959). Fecundity of Haemonchus contortus Haemonchus contortus females are very prolific, each capable of produc ing as many as 5,000 eggs daily Coyne and Smith (1992) reported that parasite fecundity was independent of the intensity of infection but fecundity increased sigmoidally to a maximum level during the initial period of infection. The high fecundity leads to rapid contamination of pastures with larvae such that high levels of ingestion can lead to death (Roberts and Swan, 1982).

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38 Clinical and Pathophysiological Signs of H. contortus Infection Haemonchus contortus infection can follow different clinical courses, ranging from chronic cases in older animals with lo w parasite burdens to acute and often fatal outbreaks in young animals or those not previously exposed to the parasite. The pathophysiology of Haemonchus infections includes different digestive tract disorders, such as loss of appetite, intestinal motility and flow alterations, increased gastric pH, and impaired energy and protein metabolism (Holmes, 1987; Fox 1997; Hoste, 2001). However, the main pathogenic mechanism is related to haematophagous feeding of the pre adult and adult stages on the abomasal muc osa, which leads to anemia, hypoproteinemia, edema and death in heavily infected animals (Rowe et al., 1988; R ahman and Collins, 1990). It has been estimated that each worm sucks about 0.05 ml of blood per day by ingestion or seepage from lesions (Urquhar t et al. 2000). Additional signs of infection include diarrhea, dehydration, peripheral and internal fluid accumulation, anorexia, depression, and loss of condition (Miller et al., 1998; Leit Browning, 2006). Production and E conomic L osses from H aemonch osis Sheep and goats, and particularly young lambs and kids, are highly susceptible to infection with H. contortus which is responsible for about 30 50% of mortality in kids and lambs in situations where few or no control measures are used (Baker, 1997; A umont et al., 1997). Another major problem is production losses due to decrease in weight and growth of the host animal that in turn lead to economic losses. Infested goats have lower growth rates, markedly reduced reproductive performance, and higher rate s of illness and death (Leit Browning, 2006). Using trickle infections of abomasal and intestinal nematodes or concurrent infections, it has been established that

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39 parasitism can impair live weight gain, soft tissue deposition, skeletal growth, and milk and wool production (Parkins and Holmes, 1989; Poppi et al., 1990; Holmes, 1993; Sykes, 1983, 1994). A reduction in voluntary feed intake and reduced feed efficiency are some of the major factors contributing to the reduced performance of parasitized ruminant s (Sykes and Coop, 1976; Symons and Hennessy, 1981; Coop et al., 1982; Sykes et al., 1988). Anthelmintic Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes Indiscriminate and excessive use of anthelmintics has led to the development of severe anthelmintic resistanc e on sheep and goat farms in many parts of the world (Van Wyk et al., 1999). Therefore, many parasite genera are resistant to one or more of the three broad spectrum anthelmintic groups on the market (the benzimidazoles, levamisole morantel drugs and the avermectins) (Van W y k et al., 1987; Van Wky and Malan, 1988; Watson and Hosking, 1990; Waller, 1994). In the southern US, frequent use of anthelmintics has resulted in selection of worm populations that are resistant to these drugs (Miller and Craig, 1996; Zajac and Gipson, 2000; Terrill et al., 2001; Mortensen et al., 2003). Selective treatment of the most infected and or the most anemic animals could prevent the development of drug resistance. Studies indicate that a practical approach to reducing selecti on pressure for anthelmintic resistance is to drench only a portion of the flock, leaving many untreated animals in which unselected, non resistant worms survive and propagate (Bisset et al., 1994; Besier, 1997). The untreated animals would continue to dep osit the eggs of anthelmintic susceptible worms on the pasture, which would maintain a reservoir of susceptible larvae in refugia, thereby slowing down the development of anthelmintic resistance (Besier, 1997). The use of selective drenching however, requi res a reliable means to differentiate between

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40 those animals, which, if left untreated, would be at risk of developing severe helminthosis and possibly dying, and those that would be in no immediate danger (Bath et al., 2001). Monitoring Gastrointestinal N ematodes with the FAMACHA Chart It is well known that during the course of fatal haemonchosis, the color of the conjunctivae of ruminants changes from the deep red of a healthy ruminant, through shades of pink to practically white, as a result of a progre ssively worsening anemia (van Wyk et al., 2002). Hematocrit measurements are generally accepted as providing the most accurate indication of the severity of anemia and they are also positively correlated (at least at the phenotypic level) with most other i ndicators of resistance/resilience to parasites (Bath et al., 2001). However, the analytical process involved in measuring hematocrits is time consuming and requires specialized equipment, which few if any farmers possess (Bath et al., 2001). In the earl y 1990s, a trial was conducted at Badplaas (Mpumalanga) in South Africa to test whether it was possible to evaluate the degree of clinical anemia caused by Haemonchus infection clinically by classifying the color of the ocular mucus membranes (Malan and Va n Wyk, 1992; Malan et al., 2001). Based on the results, a color chart called the FAMACHA chart) was developed (Bath et al., 1996). The colors were classified as red (category 1), red pink (category 2), pink (category 3), pink white (category 4) or white ( category 5) ( Malan and Van Wyk, 1992; Bisset et al., 2001 ). The name of the system was coined in honor of its originator, Francois (Faffa) Malan: FAffa MAlan CHArt (Van Wyk et al., 1997b). Clinical use of the chart for evaluation was refined in a series of subsequent trials by standardizing the five informal descriptive categories into five specified 27% for category 2, 18 22% for

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41 category 3, 13 Wyk et al., 1997 a ). T he expected mucous membranes colors of the conjunctivae of sheep with hematocrits of 35% (category 1), 25% (category 2), 20% (category 3), 15% (category 4) and 10% (category 5) is depicted in the FAMACHA chart ( Malan and Van Wyk, 1992 ; Bisset et al., 2001 ) Each animal was classified into one of the following conj unctiva color categories: red, red pink, pink, pink white or white (categories 1 5, respectively, in later trials) (Malan and Van Wyk, 1992; Van Wyk et al. 1997 a ; Malan et al. 2001). The diagnosis is done by holding the FAMACHA color chart next to the eye, and moving it up and or down till one of the color bars on the chart matches the color of the exposed conjunctiva. The feasibility of grading the degree of anemia clinically in conjunctiva mucous membranes was confirmed by both photographing the mucou s membranes and determining the hematocrit of sheep, which ranged from very healthy to extremely anemic (Malan and Van Wyk, 1992; Bath et. al., 1996; Van Wyk, et al., 1997 a ; Malan et al., 2001). Several studies have proved the suitability of the FAMACHA system as an indicator of parasite infection in sheep and goats (Malan et al., 2001; Van Wyk and Bath, 2002; Vatta et al., 2002 a, b; Kaplan et al., 2004; Ejlertsen et al., 2006). When seven methods of frequent examination to identify and treat only ani mals unable to w ithstand a worm challenge were compared, the FAMACHA system was identified as the most useful criterion for treatment of hematophagous worms (Van Wyk et al., 2002), followed by body condition score (Cottle, 1991), and then by weighing with a computerized electronic scale (Van Wyk et al., 2002). In a review article, van Wyk et al.

PAGE 42

42 (2002) concluded that the clinical evaluation of anemia using the FAMACHA system is sufficiently reliable, both in its specificity and sensitivity, to be a useful adjunct to other measures for managing haemonchosis. In their work with relatively small numbers of goats owned by resource limited (small scale) farmers, Vatta et al. ( 1999, 2001) reported that the best sensitivity and specificity (67 69%) for correctly identifying goats requiring treatment for haemonchosis (< 18% hematocrit) was achieved when animals in FAMACHA categories 3, 4 and 5 were considered to be in need of treatment. Malan and Van Wyk ( unpublished ob servations, 1991) noted that the hematocrits of sheep infected with H. contortus dropped by up to 7 percentage points in 7 days. Thus, an animal with a relatively slight degree of anemia could be on the brink of death in just over a week (van Wyk et al., 2002). The explosive nature of outbreaks of w orm infection (Rose, 1970) makes it necessary to evaluate the severity of worm infection at short intervals during peak worm infestation seasons that can last for as long as 4 5 months (Horak and Louw, 1977; Horak, 1978). The FAMACHA evaluation system all ows frequent, cheap and easy monitoring of the worm infection status of animals, and therefore offers a simple on farm alternative to hematocrit measurements and it is also useful for making animal selection and culling decisions (Bath et al., 2001). Chall enges Associated with Using the FAMACHA Chart In situations where animals are infected with multiple parasites with no predominant species present, the FAMACHA chart might not be appropriate to identify infected animals because of the lack of a blood fee ding parasite (Moors and Gauly, system is that only five categories are assigned, whereas hematocrit values may vary from 8 to over 40%. Therefore, a FAMACHA category that is a ssigned to an animal in

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43 which the hematocrit falls on or close to the somewhat arbitrary division between FAMACHA categories could almost equally correctly be assigned to either the higher or the lower FAMACHA evaluations can therefore occur. Bath et al. (2001) mentioned anecdotal evidence that the range of conjunctiva colors is narrower in goats than in sheep, therefore making the FAMACHA system more difficult to apply to goats. Kaplan et al. (2004) observe d that although FAMACHA sounds easy to use, experience in South Africa and the southern U S suggests that proper training of farmers is required to effectively use the method. Bath et al. (2001) also reported that there is a potential danger that persons using the FAMACHA system might become complacent concerning worm infection and therefore cautioned that it should be kept in mind that the system can identify only infection by haematophagous worm species. Unless recognized in time, the presence of a spec ies such as Oesophagostomum columbianum can wreak havoc, as it has a more intense effect on the production of the sheep compared with Haemonchus which is deadly but not nearly so limiting to the growth of animals. Therefore, they emphasized that the FAMAC HA clinical assay should not be used as the only indicator of worm prevalence in a worm control strategy but rather as part of an integrated approach to worm control. Immunological Control of Gastrointestinal Nematodes Infection in ruminants is predominan tly regulated by acquired immunity (Adams, 1989) which controls the impact of GIN on lifetime productivity of grazing animals (Van Houtert and Sykes, 1996). The mechanism of resistance to infection is thought to involve the immunological exclusion of H. co ntortus larvae from the mucosal surface of the abomasum following infection (Miller et al., 1983; Barger et al., 1985; Jackson et al., 1988) and an increase in the mortality rate of adult parasites (Smith, 1988; Coyne et al.,

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44 1991b). There is also an initi al loss of L3 larvae due to their failure to exsheath in the rumen (Dakkak et al., 1981). Additional effects of host immunity on GIN include inhibition of establishment of L3 larvae, arrested development, stunting, reduced egg production and expulsion of e stablished worms (Stear et al., 1995; Strain and Stear, 2001; Lacroux et al., 2006). The development of immunity is also influenced by many other factors such as gender, age and dietary protein con centration (Abbott et al., 1988; Holmes, 1985, 1988; Dobson and Bawden, 1974; Bown et al., 1991) and age at weaning (Spedding et al., 1963). The Influence o f Nutrition on Host Response to Gastrointestinal Nematodes Parasite infection, particularly with GIN, has a major effect on the efficiency of production of gr azing ruminants (Sykes, 1994). This is because nematodes impair animal productivity through reduction in voluntary food intake and or reduction in the efficiency of nutrient absorption and utilization (Coop and Kyriazakis, 2001). A common feature of many g astrointestinal parasitic infections is an increased loss of endogenous protein into the gastrointestinal tract, which is partly attributable to increased leakage of plasma protein, increased sloughing of epithelial cells and increased secretion of mucopro teins (Poppi et al., 1986; Bown et al., 1991; MacRae, 1993; Holmes, 1993). The amount of non reabsorbable endogenous nitrogen leaving the terminal ileum of parasitized sheep can be as high as 4 5 g N /day (Poppi et al., 1986; Bown et al., 1991) and this is largely responsible for the reduction in protein retention in parasitized ruminants (Poppi et al., 1986; Kimambo et al., 1988; Rowe et al., 1988). Some of the protein passing into the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract is reabsorbed, depending on whether the lesions are in the anterior or the distal tract and on whether there is adequate compensatory absorptive capacity (Coop and Holmes, 1996), but, even so,

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45 recycling of N has an energy cost. Pair feeding studies have shown that the gross efficiency of us e of metabolizable energy for energy deposition is decreased by both abomasal and intestinal infections (Sykes and Coop, 1976; 1977; Sykes, 1983). Earlier reports indicate that overall there is a net movement of protein from productive processes such as m eat, bone, milk and wool production into the synthesis of plasma proteins and repair of the gastrointestinal tract and mucus secretion in parasitized animals (Steel et al., 1982; Symons, 1985; Bown et al., 1986). Consequently, the repair processes have an adverse effect on protein metabolism in other tissues (Yu et al., 2000), thus reducing growth and reproduction. Coop and Kyriazakis (1999) proposed a nutrient partitioning priority framework of scarce nutrients such as protein in host animals and suggested maintenance of body protein has the highest priority for nutrient allocation because it guarantees animal survival in the short term. They indicated that growth and reproduction have the second highest priority because they ensure the preservation of the Functions regulating the parasite population (expression of immunity) will be greatly influenced by host nutrition, because they are likely given a lower priority for a scarce resource allocation than the functio ns of maintenance, growth or reproduction (Coop and Kyriazakis, 1999). Nutrition can affect the ability of the host to cope with the consequences of parasitism and to contain and eventually to overcome parasitism (Coop and Kyriazakis, 2001). Under some co nditions, improved nutritional status may reduce the production losses and mortality rates associated with GIN infections (Sykes and Coop, 2001; Walkden Brown and Kahn, 2002). In a review article, Athanasiadou et al. (2009) stated

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46 that host nutrition can a ffect the resident and incoming populations of pathogens and ameliorate the detrimental consequences of an infectious challenge in small ruminants in four different ways: (i) affect the fitness of the parasite through the ingestion of plant compounds, such as plant secondary metabolites; (ii) alter the conditions in the gut environment from beneficial to detrimental and even toxic for parasite survival (iii) positively affect host resistance i.e. the ability of the host to regulate gastrointestinal nematod e establishment development, fecundity and survival and (iv) enhance host resilience to the parasitic infection. Protein supplementation has improved the resilience and resistance of lambs to single and mixed gastrointestinal nematode species infections ( Van Houtert and Sykes, 1996; Knox and Steel, 1996, 1999). Parasitized lambs were better able to resist the effects of infection when given a higher protein diet in early (Laurence et al., 1951; Brunsdon, 1964) and more recent (Abbott et al., 1988; Wallace et al., 1996) studies with sheep. Similarly, positive effects of protein supplementation on resilience to nematode infection have been recorded in goats (van Houtert and Sykes, 1996). Coop and Holmes (1996) noted that the main effect of protein supplementa tion is to increase the rate of acquisition of immunity and increase resistance to reinfection, which has been associated with an enhanced cellular immune response in the gastrointestinal mucosa. They cited recent trials, which showed that growing sheep of fered a free choice between a low and a high protein ration, could modify their diet selection in order to alleviate the increase in protein requirements, which result from GIN infection. In general, the improvements in resilience caused by dietary protein supplementation are greatest in young, naive animals, in which pathophysiological

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47 disturbances to the gastrointestinal tract such as protein depleting gastroenteritis and changes in gut function are most pronounced (Holmes, 1993; Fox, 1997). Kambara et a l. (1993) investigated the effect of two levels of dietary protein (110 g CP/kg DM and 200 g CP/kg DM) on the acquisition of immunity in lambs infected with T. colubriformis and showed that dietary protein supplementation increased the resistance of lambs of 2 6 months of age but the effect was not apparent in sheep of 8 12 months of age. Other studies indicated that growing lambs aged 3 6 months acquire immunity to GIN infections more slowly than sheep that are more than 8 months old (Manton et al., 1962; Urquhart et al., 1966 b c ; Dineen et al., 1978). There is compelling evidence (Bown, 1991; Donaldson et al. 1998) that dietary protein is more important than energy at improving resilience, although, if the animal is severely undernourished, increasing e nergy supply will obviously have an effect on resilience. Supplementation with nutrients such as fats that appear to have immunosuppressive properties has also reduced parasite populations in small ruminants (Chandra, 1993). Effects of Condensed Tannins on Nutrient Utilization and Gastrointestinal Nematodes Definition, Classes and Distribution of Tannins in Plants Tannins are anti nutritional phenolic components, which are found in the cell sap of approximately 80% of woody and 15% of herbaceous dicotyled onous species (Bryant et al., 1991). Although tannins are chemically a diverse and ill defined group, they are grouped into two main classes, the hydrolysable (HT) and the condensed tannins (CT) (Mangan, 1988, Athanasiadou et al., 2001). Of the two types, CT are the most common in forage legumes, trees, and shrubs (Barry and McNabb, 1999). They are contained

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48 within the vacuoles or cell walls of plant cells and can be expressed in various organs including leaves, stems, bark, roots, flowers or seeds (Barry 1989) depending on plant species. However, tannins are more abundant in the parts of the plant that are most herbivores (Terrill et al., 1992; Van Soest, 1994; lvarez d el Pino et al., 2001). The hydroxyl groups of the carbohydrates in HT are partially or totally esterified with phenolic groups like gallic acid (gallotannins) or ellagic acid (ellagitannins) (Waghorn and McNabb, 2003) and as their name suggests, they can be hydrolyzed by heating with weak acids. Condensed tannins on the other hand, are a group of polyphenolic secondary metabolites synthesized in plants as oligomers or polymers of flavan 3 ol units via the flavonoid pathway (Pereg et al., 1999; Santos Buelg a et al., 2000; Fei et al., 2008). The flavan 3 ol units in CT are linked by carbon carbon bonds (Hagerman and Butler, 1981; Foo et al., 1986; Waghorn and McNabb, 2003) and they are not susceptible to cleavage by hydrolysis (Reed, 1995). The CT are also re ferred to as proanthocyanidins, which is derived from the acid catalyzed oxidation reaction that produces red anthocyanidins through heating of proanthocyanidins in acidic alcohol solutions (Haslam, 1982). Synthesis of CT originates in the cell cytoplasm f rom phenylalanine and acetate precursors (Mueller Harvey and McAllan, 1992) to form catechin units in the cell vacuole. The number of monomeric units are variable (Foo et al., 1996, 1997) thus making an infinite variety of chemical structures possible, whi ch in turn affects the biological properties of the CT (Barry et al., 1999). The constitutive flavan 3 ol monomers in CT have an A, B and C ring structure ( M ueller Harvey and McAllan 1992 ) and the monomeric units are linked together with interflavan bonds

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49 predominantly of C8 in the A ring to C4 in the C ring, whereas C4 to C6 linkages that give rise to polymer branching are less common (Haslam, 1989). Condensed Tannin R eactivity with P rotein and O ther M olecules Condensed tannins are known to complex with a range of molecules but derive their main biochemical properties from an ability to precipitate protein at neutral pH (Tanner et al., 2000). The interaction between tannins and protein is very specific (Hagerman and Butter, 1994) and in animals, it starts in the mouth. Condensed tannins are released from the vacuoles of plant cells when chewed (which ruptures plant cells), enabling them to complex with plant proteins, primarily by hydrogen bonding (Loomis and Battaile 1966). The reaction is rapid, with mu ch of the plant protein precipitated by the time it enters the rumen (Mangan et al., 19 76; Min et al. 2003 ) High concentrations of free CT in the rumen can react with other sources of protein such as enzymes secreted by rumen bacteria, and thereby inhibit rumen carbohydrate fermentation (Barry and Manley, 1986). The binding capacity of CT depends on their hydroxylation pattern (Reed 1995), types of terminal groups (Foo et al., 1996), the structure of binding sites (Asquith et al., 1987), and polymer size ( Hagerman and Butler 1981). The reactivity of CT with proteins is based on two mechanisms, hydrogen bonding, which is reversible, and oxidative coupling, which is not reversible (McLeod, 1974, Swain, 1979). The large number of free hydroxyl groups on the numerous phenolic groups in CT enables hydrogen bonding with proteins and other molecules (McLeod, 1974; Hagerman and Butler, 1991; Leinmller et al., 1991). However, the strength of the association appears to be affected by the size of the polymer, the pr edominance of prodelphinidin relative to procyanidin units, the types of terminal groups (2,3 cis or 2,3 trans), and the structure of potential binding sites (C4/C8 or

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50 C4/C6 interflavanoid linkages) that affect the shape of the CT polymer chain (Hagerman a nd Butler, 1981; Foo et al., 1996; 1997). The strength of the association is also determined by hydrophobic interactions between the phenol rings and portions of protein or amino acids, the prevailing pH (Asquith and But l er, 1986) and the molecular weight of the CT (Horigome et al., 1988; Haslam, 1989). Formation of tannin protein complexes is specific, both in terms of the tannin and protein involved, and the degree of affinity between the participating molecules (McLeod, 1974; Zucker, 1983; Mangan, 1988; Hagerman and Butler, 1991). The CT protein interaction will be strongest, when the pH is near the isoelectric point of the protein, as this minimizes the protein protein electrostatic repulsion (Hagerman and Butler 1981; Mangan 1988). The CT protein com plexes are stable and insoluble at pH 3.5 7.0, but dissociate and release protein at pH <3.5 (Jones and Mangan, 1977). In contrast, covalently bonded CT protein complexes are thought to be irreversibly bound (Leinmuller et al. 1991) and may not dissociate in the abomasum (McLeod 1974) where the pH is typically about 2. Drying and heating forages can cause CT to bind covalently to other plant constituents, and may reduce the amount of free CT available to bind protein in the rumen (Terrill et al. 1989, 1992 ). Although tannins mainly exert their effects on proteins, they also affect carbohydrates, particularly hemicellulose, cellulose, starch and pectins (Barry and Manley, 1984; Chiquette et al., 1988; Leinmller et al., 1991; Schofield et al., 2001). Conden sed tannins may also complex with glycoproteins, but this is usually with a lower affinity than for protein (Barry 1989). Nutritional Benefits of Condensed Tannins in Ruminants In the ruminant, ingested amino acids are deaminated to release ammonia, whi ch is absorbed across the rumen wall, converted to urea in the liver, and then

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51 recycled to the rumen or excreted in the urine (MacRae and Uylatt, 1974; Uylatt and MacRae, 1974; Waghorn and Barry, 1987). Reducing excess ruminal ammonia concentrations is des irable because it minimizes N losses and may prevent reproductive problems in ruminants associated with high levels of PUN (Elrod and Butler 1993; Ferguson et al. 199 3 ). Condensed tannins have been shown to lower soluble protein and ammonia N levels in ru minal fluid (Barry et al. 1986; Chiquette et al. 1989; McMahon et al. 1999) and to promote greater N retention by reducing urea excretion (Egan and Ulyatt ., 1980) and/or by increasing urea recycling to the rumen (Waghorn et al. 1994). Waghorn and McNab b (2003) also reported that dietary CT lowers urinary N excretion and this has potential for reducing nitrous oxide losses and nitrate leaching from dung and urine patches. Condensed tannins also tend to increase the flow of and absorption of non ammonia n itrogen from the small intestine (Min and Hart, 2003). At low dietary concentrations, tannins have been reported to improve utilization of feed protein by ruminants without impairing feed intake or carbohydrate digestibility (Waghorn et al. 1987a; Waghorn 1990; Wang et al. 1994). Barry et al. (2001) reported that moderate levels of CT (20 to 40 g of CT per kg of DM) bind to protein by hydrogen bonding at near neutral pH in the rumen to form CT protein complexes, but dissociate and release bound protein at pH less than 3.5 in the abomasum. Intake of under 50 g CT/kg DM improves the digestive utilization of feed by ruminants mainly because of a reduction in ruminal protein degradation and as a consequence, a greater availability of amino acids for absorption in the small intestine (Schwab, 1995; Barry and McNabb, 1999; Min et al., 2003).

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52 Detrimental Effects of Condensed Tannins on Ruminant Nutrition The presence of tannins can affect the palatability and ultimately the amount of forage consumed by animals ( McMahon et al., 1999). An inverse relationship exists between high CT level in forages ( > 50 g CT/kg DM) and their palatability, voluntary intake, digestibility and N retention in ruminants (Kumar and Vaithiyanathan, 1990; Silanikove et al., 1996). Several reports indicate that high concentrations of CT (generally > 50 g per kg of DM) depress voluntary feed intake, digestive efficiency, and animal productivity (Barry and Duncan, 1984; Barry, 1985; Pritchard et al. 1988; Terrill et al. 1989; Reed et al., 199 0; Carulla, 1994; Wiegand et al. 199 6 ; Barahona et al. 1997; Aerts et al., 1999). Similarly, Leinmuller et al. (1991) reported that at concentrations exceeding 6% of dietary DM, CT depress feed intake, reduce the digestibility of fiber and protein, and dec rease the growth rate of ruminant livestock. The intake reduction is attributed to binding of dietary protein, salivary mucoprotein and mucosal epithelial cells by CT (Provenza and Malechek, 1984). This causes a diffused feeling of extreme dryness and a b itter taste in the mouth and throat of the animal commonly referred to as an astringent sensation (Goldstein and Swain, 1963; Mole and Waterman, 1987), prompting the animal to avoid tanniferous feeds (Haslam, 1989). However, Waghorn et al. (1994a) suggeste d that reductions in intake in sheep by CT were more attributable to decreased ruminal turnover and rate of digestion than reductions in palatability in sheep fed pure diets of Lotus pedunculatus in comparison to sheep fed L. pedunculatus with polyethylene glycol, which binds CT and prevents it from binding to proteins. Some studies have shown that fiber degradation in the rumen can be drastically reduced in animals that consume tannin rich feeds (Barry and McNabb, 1999; McSweeney et al., 2001; Hervs et al ., 2003 ). Condensed tannins may reduce cell wall

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53 digestibility by binding bacterial enzymes and (or) forming indigestible complexes with cell wall carbohydrates (Barry and Manley, 1984; Barry et al., 1986; Reed et al., 1990). The reduction in digestibility has also been attributed to 1) irreversible binding of dietary protein by tannins, forming a tannin protein complex that resists the effect of digestive enzymes (Mole and Waterman, 1987; Horigome et al., 1988), 2) to binding and thereby inactivating dige stive enzymes (Goldstein and Swain, 1965) 3) to binding both enzymes and substrates (Hagerman and Butler, 1978; Horigome et al., 1988). Tannins can reduce nutrient absorption from the small intestine (Driedger and Ha t field, 1972; Silanikove et al., 1994; McNabb et al., 1998 and Silanikove et al., 2001) due to 1) the presence of tannin protein complexes that failed to dissociate in the abomasum, 2) the formation of tannin digestive enzyme complexes or new tannin dietary protein complexes, or 3) changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients due to the interaction of tannins with intestinal mucosa (Frutos et al., 2004). Though tannin protein complexes can dissociate at pH <3.5 in the abomasum, McNabb et al. (1998) indicated that the pH at the proximal part of the intestine (~5.5) may allow tannin protein complexes to reform, and therefore impede digestion. Condensed tannins are not absorbed into the blood stream (Terrill et al., 1994) but may affect the mucosa of the digestive tract, which could decrease abs orption of other nutrients such as amino acids and in particular methionine and lysine which are most susceptible (Reed, 1995). Decreased methionine availability could increase the toxicity of other plant compounds such as cyanogenic glycosides, because me thionine is involved in the detoxification of cyanide via methylation to thiocyanate (Reed, 1995). Abomasal depolymerization of condensed tannins under acidic conditions may also

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54 yield toxic products (McLeod, 1974; Kumar and Singh, 1984; Lindroth and Batzl i, 1984; Mehansho et al., 1987). Ingestion of feeds with high amounts of tannins can cause gastritis and damage to the intestinal mucous membranes, enabling absorption of hydrolyzable tannins (HT) (McLeod, 1974). Such HT can be degraded into toxic end prod ucts that cause hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, liver necrosis, and renal tubular necrosis (Murdiati et al., 1990; Reed, 1995). Differences in Response of Ruminants to Condensed Tannins Effects of CT on ruminants vary with the type of tannin or plant source and the ruminant. Compared to other ruminants, goats are relatively less affected by antinutritional factors in many plants because of differences in their salivary proteins (Foley et al., 1999). Tannins may complex preferentially to the proline rich sali vary proteins, thereby becoming unavailable to interact with and reduce the digestibility of dietary protein (Austin et al. 1989; Hagerman and Robbins 1993). Goats and other browsing animals secrete relatively large quantities of proline rich proteins co nstantly, while sheep only produce them when consuming plants rich in tannins (Robbins et al., 1987; Austin et al., 1989). Gilboa (1995) found that the parotid saliva of goats was relatively rich in proline (6.5%), glutamine (16.5%) and glycine (6.1%), wh ich are known to enhance the affinity of proteins to tannins (Mehansho et al., 1987). Proteins that bind strongly with CT have a high molecular weight, open and flexible structure, and high concentrations of proline and other hydrophobic amino acids (Hager man and Butler, 1981; Asquith and Butler, 1986; Spencer et al., 1988; Waterman, 2000). Some studies indicate that the formation of tannin proline rich protein complexes unlike other protein tannin complexes are stable across the whole pH range of the diges tive tract (Robbins et al., 1987; Austin et al., 1989; McArthur et al., 1995; Narjisse et al., 1995). This would

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55 prevent such proteins from being released for postruminal utilization by the acidic conditions in the abomasum. Condensed Tannins as Sustainab le Alternatives to Anthelmintics Several integrated approaches are being investigated as sustainable alternatives to use of anthelmintics to control GIN. These include exploitation of the genetic resistance of livestock, biological control through either v accination or feeding nematophagous fungi that trap free living fecal GIN larvae, manipulation of grazing management, dietary supplementation with protein, or grazing of forages containing tannins (Coop and Kyriazakis, 2001). There are wide variations in t he concentrations of condensed tannins in plants (Mueller Harvey, 1999). Interest in using such plants as an alternative to traditional anthelmintics has stimulated several recent in vivo (Niezen et al., 1995, 1998; Athanasiadou et al., 2000, 2001; Min an d Hart, 2003; Paolini et al., 2003 a, b, c ; Shaik et al., 2004) and in vitro (Athanasiadou et al., 2001; Molan et al., 2002; Bahuaud et al., 2006) studies. Grazing small ruminants on forages high in condensed tannins (CT) has reduced the number of parasite eggs in the feces of sheep and goats (Niezen et al., 1995; Min and Hart, 2003; Paolini et al., 2003a) and hays made from such forages also had anthelmintic effects (Paolini et al., 2003b; Shaik et al., 2004, 2006; Lange et al., 2006). Shaik et al. (2006) r eported a direct inhibitory effect of feeding sericea lespedeza (SL) hay instead of bahiagrass hay on fecal larvae and adult Haemonchus contortus Trichostrongylides circumcincta and T. colubriformis worms in the abomasum and small intestine of goats and a ttributed these responses to direct toxic effects of the condensed tannin in SL. Similarly, Lange et al. (2006) reported that SL hay effectively reduced (67 98%) fecal egg counts (FEC) and worm numbers relative to bermudagrass, with more of an effect on re ducing worm burdens (67.2%)

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56 than on reducing establishment of incoming larvae (26.1%). Min et al. (2003b) showed that GIN were controlled when Angora does were grazed on SL (52 g of CT/kg of DM) in spring and summer, but not when goats were grazed on the c ontrol pasture, a mixture of crabgrass (Digitaria Spp.) and tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreb.; 2.0 g of CT/kg of DM). The SL diet was also associated with a reduction in the numbers of H. contortus (94%) and Teladorsagia spp. (100%) in the abomasum and Trichostrogylus (45%) in the small intestine (Min et al. 2003b). Lambs artificially infected with T. colubriformis had greater daily liveweight gains, lower nematode FEC and lower worm burdens when grazing the perennial Mediterranean legume Hedysarum c oronarium (sulla; ~120 g of CT/kg of DM) than when grazing lucerne ( Medicago sativa L. ), which does not contain CTs (Niezen et al., 1995). Lange et al. (2005) reported reduced FEC and worm counts in sheep fed SL hay compared with bermudagrass hay, and attr ibuted the results to both direct effects of SL on the nematodes and a reduction in fecundity. Condensed tannins control GIN by interfering with hatching of parasite eggs and their development to the infective stage larvae (Min and Hart, 2003). Strong evid ence for direct anthelmintic effects of CTs is provided by an experiment in which drenching sheep infested with Haemonchus contortus Teladorsagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus vitrinus reduced the viability of infective larvae for all three species (A thanasiadou et al. 2001a). Supporting evidence was provided by Molan et al. (2000) who demonstrated that CT extracted from big trefoil ( Lotus pedunculatus Cav.) birdsfoot trefoil ( Lotus corniculatus L.) Hedysarum coronarium, and sainfoin ( Onobrychis vi ciifolia Scop. ) forages had dose dependent anthelmintic effect against immature stages of several nematode species. They also reduced the rate of larval

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57 development by 91%, reduced the number of eggs hatching by 34%, and decreased the mobility of L3 larvae by 30%. Min and Hart ( 2003) reported that in addition to exerting direct effects on internal parasites, CT may indirectly control the parasites by increasing the resistance and resilience of animals to GIN infections through improved protein nutrition. Al though these studies demonstrate the potential of using forage CT to control GIN, Mueller Harvey ( 1999) stated that it is not possible to predict the anti parasitic properties of plant species simply by their CT concentrations because different plants cont ain CTs with very different structures and hence reactivity.

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58 CHAPTER 3 EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENT ING BAHIAGRASS HAY W ITH WARM SEASON LEGUME HAYS ON FEED INTAKE, DIGESTIBILITY, NITRO GEN RETENTION, BODY WEIGHT GAIN AND PARASITE BU RDEN OF GOAT KIDS In many parts of the world, the nutritional needs of goats are met using forages alone for economic reasons. Goats eat all classes of forage but prefer about 60% browse, 20% grasses and legumes, and 20% forbs (Pinkerton and Pinkerton, 1996). Hence, most goats are raised on pasture or native range based extensive systems. In Florida as well as the s outhern Coastal Plains of Georgia and Alabama, bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum Flgge) is the major pasture grass used by the livestock industry (Blount et al., 2001). The yie ld of bahiagrass is normally sufficient to meet intake requirements of most ruminant livestock during the grazing season. However, the quality is often insufficient for growing or lactating ruminants due to low dry matter (DM) digestibility and crude prot ein (CP) concentration (Duble et al., 1971; Johnson et al., 2001; Redmon, 2002). Supplements may be necessary for optimal growth of goats and because protein is usually limiting in grass based diets, protein supplementation usually improves production of goats fed warm season grasses (Ahmed and Nour, 1997; Ott et al., 2002). Grain based commercial supplements may not be economical for growing and finishing meat goats particularly in Florida because most grains are imported into the state at significant co st. Legumes are alternative protein sources to commercial supplements and inter seeded grass legume pastures can be used to extend the grazing season and increase nutrient supply to grazing livestock thereby decreasing feed costs (Leep et al., 2002; Muir, 2002). Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites are one of the most important disease constraints to small ruminant productivity in the world (Over et al., 1992; Perry et al.,

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59 2002). The GIN, particularly Haemonchus contortus present the greatest dange r to the viability of the goat industry in the southeastern region of the United States (Leite Browning, 2006). Control of GIN based on suppressive or therapeutic use of drugs (Coop and Kyriazakis, 2001) has resulted in widespread anthelmintic resistance i n goats, sheep and cattle in many areas of the world (Prichard, 1994; Waller, 1994, 1997) including the southern US (Miller and Craig, 1996; Zajac and Gipson, 2000; Terrill et al., 2001; Mortensen et al., 2003). Therefore, sustainable alternative strategie s are needed to reduce the GIN burden of ruminant livestock. Some recent studies have shown that when fed to goats instead of bahiagrass, sericea lespedeza [ Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours., G. Don ] is an effective dewormer (Lange et al., 2006; Shaik et al. 2006; Moore et al., 2008; Terrill et al., 2009), which also increased the performance of goats (Min et al., 2005 ). However lespedeza is not recommended for Florida because it is not well adapted (Newman et al., 2010). The objective of this study was t o investigate the potential of using warm season legumes adapted to the Florida climate to reduce the parasite burden of goats and enhance their performance. The hypothesis was that supplementing bahiagrass hay with the warm season legume hays will reduce the GIN burden of goats and increase their performance. Materials and Methods Forage P roduction Soybean [SB, Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Hinson] and cowpea [CWP, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Iron clay] were harvested at the University of Florida Santa Fe Beef Unit at the recommended R7 stage (Wiederho lt and Albrecht, 2003; Pederson 2004) and pod yellowing initiation stages (NDA, 1997), respectively, which give the best combination of nutritive value and herbage mass. The R7 stage of SB occurs when 1

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60 po d on the main stem has reached its mature color (usually brown or tan color) lower leaves of the plants are beginning to yellow but remain attached to the plant, and seeds at 1 of the 4 uppermost nodes completely fill the pods (Coffey et al., 1995; Sheaff er et al., 2001; Wiederholt and Albrecht, 2003; Pederson, 2004). A 6 wk regrowth of bahiagrass hay (BG, cv. Pensacola) was harvested from an established stand at the same unit. Each forage was mowed and after field drying rolled into 440 kg round bales us ing a Claas Rollant 660 baler (Claas of America, Omah, NE. Square bales (50 kg) of sericea lespedeza [LES, Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours.) G. Don. cv AU Grazer] and perennial peanut (PEA, Arachis glabrata Benth. cv. Florigraze) hay were purchased from prod ucers in North Carolina and Florida respectively. Each hay bale was stored in a fully enclosed barn for up to 5 months and fed without grinding. Animals All animal procedures were approved by the University of Florida Institutional Animal Care and Use C ommittee. The experiment was conducted at the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL from May to September 2011. The average temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation during the experiment were 78.4 + 4 o C, 78.7 + 8 % and 9.6 + 26.4 mm respectively (FAWN, 2012). The exper iment had three phases of implementation namely digestibility, infection and performance. Boer Spanish Kiko cross goats (n= 40) weighing 24.3 9.8 kg were orally dewormed with Albendazole (Valbaz en, 10 mg/kg BW) and Moxidectin (Cydectin, 0.4 mg/kg BW), weighed for two consecutive days, stratified by body weight, and allocated to 5 blocks such that within each block live weights did not differ by more than 5 kg. Goats in each block were then random ly assigned to 5 dietary treatments namely BG

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61 hay alone and 50:50 (DM basis) mixtures of BG hay and SB, CWP, PEA, or LES hay. Legume supplemented diets were formulated to meet or exceed the nutrient requirements of a 25 kg Boer goat gaining 25 g/d (NRC, 2 007). Housing and feeding G oats were first housed individually in metabolic crates (100 x 40 x 80 cm). Diets were fed for an adaptation period of 17 days (d) after which measurements of feed consumed, total feces and urine produced and feed refused were t aken daily during a 7 d period. Canvas fecal bags were strapped onto each goat for feces collection and contents were weighed twice daily. Urine was collected twice daily from 35 goats ( 7 per treatment), which were in cages adapted for urine collection. Th e bahiagrass and respective legume supplements were hand mixed and offered at 0700 and 1400 h daily at an ad libitum level. To achieve the 50:50 mix, the projected total diet amount to be offered for a certain day was calculated and half was fed as either bahiagrass or the legume. Water was also provided for ad libitum intake and 20 g of a vitamin mineral premix (Sweetlix Minerals Livestock Supplement System, Mankato, MN) was added to the diet of each goat daily. The mineral vitamin mix contained at least 1 4% Ca, 8% P, 10% NaCl, 1.5% Mg, 1.5% K, 1.55% S, 1.25% Fe, 1.26% Mn, 1.25% Zn, 240 mg/kg Co, 1750 mg/kg Cu, 1,810 mg/kg 450 mg/kg I, 50 mg/kg Se, 136 100 IU/kg Vitamin A, 22 680 lU/ kg Vitamin D3 and 182 lU/ kg Vitamin E. Goats were removed from the cages and exercised for 1 h every 7 d. On day 24, g oats were removed from the cages, weighed and then placed on bahiagrass pasture for 42 days ( June 22 August 5, 2011 ) to allow natural infection with Haemonchus contortus L3 larvae and coccidian oocysts, whic h are prevalent in the pasture in the summer. On d ay 66 (August 5, 2011) goats were weighed blood

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62 sampled by jugular venipuncture and then housed in 20 m 2 pens (3 pens per treatment, 2 3 goats per pen) with concrete floors and feed and water troughs and fed the same diets until d 105. Sample collection Feed offered and orts were weighed daily during the 7 day measurement period and representatively sampled for chemical analysis. A 20% subsample of the fecal output from each goat was refrigerated (4C) for subsequent analysis. The volume of urine produced was measured twice daily and sulfuric acid was added to subsamples prior to freezing ( 20 o C) to ensure that the pH remained below 2.0. Feces and urine samples from the measurement period were composited by goat and analyzed for N concentration. In addition, concentrations of organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) were determined i n the feces. Intake and apparent in vivo digestibility of DM, OM, N and NDF, and N retention were calculated. Goats were weighed on d 0 and 24 and about 20 mL of whole blood was sampled by jugular venipuncture into vacutainer tubes (BD, Franklin Lakes, NJ) containing sodium heparin anticoagulant. The blood was centrifuged at 1920 x g for 20 minutes at 4 o C to separ ate the plasma, which was stored at 20 o C for further analysis. Ruminal fluid was collected from 20 randomly selected goats (4 per treatment) on d 22 by aspiration from orally inserted stomach tubes 4 h after the morning feeding. The rumen contents were fi ltered through two layers of cheesecloth and the pH was measured (Accumet, model XL 25, Fischer Scientific, Pittsburg, PA) immediately. Approximately 0.1 ml 50% H 2 SO 4 was added to the ruminal fluid to reduce the pH to < 2. After the reaction with bicarbo nate subsided, samples were centrifuged for 30 min at 4 o C and 2795 g, and frozen ( 20 o C) for subsequent analysis.

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63 In pens, o rts were collected and weighed once weekly and representative samples of each feed, orts, jugular blood, and feces were taken week ly and stored for further analysis. Approximately 3 mL of blood plasma were col lected, processed, and stored as described in Fecal samples (approximately 4 g), were collected directly from the rectum and immediately analyzed for gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) and Eimeria spp. fecal egg counts (FEC). Body weights were measured at the beginning and end of the experiment and weekly in the intervening period. Goats were monitored weekly for evidence of parasite infection using the FAMACHA eye chart (Van Wyk and Bath, 2002), which is a color coded chart showing five pictures of the conjunctiva of goat eyelids numbered from 1 (normal red color) to 5 (very pale color denoting severe anemia). Goats with packed cell volume values (PCV) below 19% were closely moni tored for further decreases in PCV during the subsequent days and dewormed as needed. Those with PCV below 15 were euthanized. Chemical analysis Samples of feed offered, orts and feces were oven dried at 60 o C for 48 h to determine DM concentration and gr ound to pass through a 1 mm screen in a Willey mill (Arthur H. Thomas Company, Philadelphia, PA). Residual DM of ground samples was determined by oven drying at 105C overnight, ash was measured by combustion in a muffle furnace at 600C overnight. Total N was determined by rapid combustion using a macro elemental N analyzer (Elementar, vario MAX CN, Elementar Americas, Mount Laurel, NJ) and used to calculate CP (N x 6.25). Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) was analyzed using the method of Van Soest et al. (199 1). Amylase and sodium sulfite were used for NDF analysis and the results were expressed exclusive of residual ash. Feed samples were analyzed for acid detergent fiber (ADF) and acid detergent lignin (ADL)

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64 using the method of AOAC (1990). Condensed tannin (CT) concentration of the hays was determined as described by Terrill et al. (1992). Condensed tannin extracted from each species was used to develop the respective standard curve analyzing the tannin concentration of that species (Wolfe et al., 2008). Ur ine was analyzed using the Kjeldahl technique at Dairy One analytical laboratory, Ithaca, NY. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) in ruminal fluid were measured using the method of Canale et al. (1984) via a high pressure liquid chromatograph system (Hi tachi, FL 7485, Tokyo, Japan) coupled to a UV detector (Spectroflow 757, ABI Analytical Kratos Division, Ramsey, NJ) set at 210 nm. The column was a Bio Rad Aminex HPX 87H (Bio Rad laboratories, Hercules, CA) with 0.015 M H 2 SO 4 mobile phase and a flow rate of 0.7 mL /min at 45 o C. Ruminal fluid NH 3 N concentration was determined by an ALPKEM auto analyzer (ALPKEM Corporation, Clackamas, OR) with an adaptation of the Noel and Hambleton (1976) procedure that involved c o lorimetric quantification of N. Plasma urea N (PUN ), glucose (Pglu) concentration were measured using adaptations for a Technicon Autoanalyzer II (Bran Luebbe, Elinsford, NY) of methods of Coulombe and Favreau (1963) and Gochman and Schmitz (1972), respectively. Blood samples were analyzed for p acked cell volume (PCV) was measured using a micro hematocrit reader (Cat. #2201, Damon/IEC Division, Needham Heights, MA) after centrifugation in a micro hematocrit centrifuge (Model IEC MB Damon/IEC Division, Needham Heights, MA). Plasma haptoglobin concentratio ns were determined by measuring haptoglobin/hemoglobin complexing based on differences in peroxidase activit y (Makimura and Suzuki, 1982).

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65 F ecal samples were used to enumerate FEC of H. contortus and Eimeria spp. using the modified McMaster procedure of W hitlock (1948). Statistical Analysis Data from the digestibility phase were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with 5 treatments and eight goats (experimental units) per treatment. The model for analyzing the animal data included treatment, bl ock and goat effects. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (SAS v 9.3; 2012, SAS Inst., Inc., Cary, NC) was used for the analysis and least square means were separated with the Tukey procedure when the overall treatment effect was significant (P<0.05). Tendencies were declared when the P value was > 0.05 < 0.11. Data from the performance phase were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with 5 treatments and 3 experimental units (pens) per treatment using the GLIMMIX procedure. The model for analyzing trea tment effects included treatment, block, time (repeated measure), treatment x time and pen(treatment). The covariance structure with the least Akaike information criterion was chosen for each analysis performed. The slice command was used to detect differe nces between treatments at specific time points. For FEC data, the distribution of residuals was examined using the normal probability, quantiles quantiles and predicted mean plots and data were log transformed if appropriate. Mortality rates were analyze d using the LOGISTIC procedure and the EXACT statement with a model that included the observed outcome, treatment, block, and pen effects Least square means were separated with the Tukey

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66 Results and Discussion Forage chemical composition Table 3 1 shows the chemical composition of the forages used in the study. All supplemental legumes had greater CP and ADL concentrations than BG. Among the legumes, SOY had greater CP concentration than PEA and CWP and LES had the greatest lignin concentration. The BG had the greatest NDF concentration, followed by LES. Cowpea had greater ADF concentration than other hays. Condensed tannin concentrations were greater in LES than PEA but they were not detected in the other forages. The CP concentrations in this study were similar to those for BG and SOY in the study of Foster et al. (2009) but lower than those for CWP and PEA, whereas NDF concentrations were greater for BG, CWP and PEA in this study. Organic matter, CP and NDF concentrations for BG were lower than those reported by Kostenbauder et al. (2007). The NDF and ADF concentrations of LES were similar while the CP concentration was greater than th at reported by Turner et al. (20 05). These differences may be attributable to differences in cultivar maturity at harvest and growth environment s of the forages. Sericea lespedeza had more CT than the other forages but the concentration was not high enough (>50 g/kg DM) to decrease fe ed intake, digestive efficiency and animal producti on (Reed et al., 1990; Carulla, 1994; Wiegand et al. 199 6 ; Barahona et al. 1997; Aerts et al., 1999). At these relatively low dietary concentrations, tannins would be expected to improve utilization of f eed protein by ruminants without impairing feed intake or carbohydrate digestibility (Waghorn et al. 1987; Waghorn 1990; Wang et al. 1994).

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67 Intake, digestibility and nitrogen retention Intake of DM (DMI), OM (OMI), NDF (NDFI) and CP (CPI) is presented in Table 3 2. Daily DMI ( g/d) tended (P = 0.07) to increase with LES and PEA supplementation as did OMI and NDFI (P = 0.06 and 0.09, respectively). Crude protein intake was greater (P = 0.01) in goats fed LES and PEA than other forages. Generally, DMI w as at the lower end of the typical range (1.8 to 3.8%) for meat goats (Devendra and Burns, 1983). This could have been due to the relatively high NDF concentrations of the forages and loss of leaves during haymaking, which can reduce DMI particularly in le gumes (Linn and Martin, 199 9). Another reason for the low DMI could be the long particle size of the hays. Omokanye et al. (200 1 ) noted that chopping of forage browse s before feeding sheep improved feed intake by 60%. Intake in this study w as lower than f or the chopped forages fed to sheep by Foster et al. (2009). In this study, the forages were intentionally not chopped to prevent leaf loss and the attendant decreases in nutritive value and because most goat producers do not chop hay before it is fed Ho wever, this may have facilitated selection for more nutritious parts of the forage and reduced intake by goats, which are inherently very selective feeders (Morand Fehr et al., 1991). The DMI for PEA and LES were similar to those reported by Ravhuhali e t al. (2011) and tended to be greater than that for BG. In contrast, DMI tended to be less among goats fed CWP and SOY rather than BG. This is largely attributable to the thicker stems of CWP and SOY, which would have increased selection by goats. The broa d leaves of CWP and SOY would have also been more prone to shatter during haymaking and sampling than those of the other hays further reducing the amount of CP and highly nutritious components available for consumption on these forages.

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68 The in vivo appare nt DMD of the BG in this study (Table 3 3) was similar to th at ( 57.3% ) reported by Kostenbauder et al. (2007) and DMD values for the other hays were similar to or slightly lower than those reported in other studies (Njarui et al., 2003; Foster et al., 2009 ; Ravhuhali et al., 2011). The DMD and OMD of the hays were not affected (P = 0.42 and 0.58, respectively) by legume supplementation. These results contradict others, which indicated that supplementing poor quality basal grass diets with legume forage incr eased DMD (Getachew et al., 1994; Foster et al., 2009) even though a similar numerical trend was consistently evident in this study. Statistically significant differences (P<0.05) may have not been achieved in this study due to the high lignin concentratio ns of the legumes which would limit digestibility and their relatively low DMI and CP concentrations, which would have limited supply of sufficient N to the rumen to increase microbial digestion of the forages. As in the study of Foster et al. (2009), le gume supplementation did not increase NDF digestibility because legumes contained more lignin than BG. However, legume supplementation increased (P = 0.01) CP digestibility as reported in other studies (Alokan, 2004; Foster et al., 2009). There was a ten dency (P = 0.06) for increased N intake with LES and PEA supplementation (Table 3 4) but fecal and urinary N output were unaffected (P > 0.10) by treatment. Consequently, LES and PEA supplementation increased (P = 0.03) N retention relative to BG but feedi ng CWP and SOY did not. In addition to the greater CPI of LES and PEA, the increased N retention of animals fed these diets is likely attributable at least partly to the CT they contained, which promote greater N retention

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69 by reducing urea excretion and or by increasing urea recycling to the rumen (Waghorn et al. 1994). Ruminal fermentation indices and blood metabolites Table 3 5 summarizes the effects of supplementing BG hay with LES, CWP, SOY and PEA hays on ruminal fermentation indices and PUN and Pglu concentrations. The ruminal pH values in this study were within the normal range of 6.2 to 6.8 for forage based diets (Ishler and Heinrichs, 1996) and they were unaffected by treatment. There was a tendency (P = 0.08) for increased ammonia N concentration with legume supplementation. However, values did not proportionately reflect N intake values perhaps reflecting differences in N recycling on the diets. Most values approximated that (5 mg/dL) reported to optimize ruminal microbial protein synthesis in vi tro (Satter and Slyter, 1974) Broderick (2007) suggested that greater ammonia N concentrations are required in situ and in vivo than the 5 mg/dL reported by Satter and Slyter (1974). Values for the control and legume supplemented diets approximated and were lower than corresponding respective values reported by ( Foster et al. 2009 ). Lower values for the legume diets in this study may reflect the lower N intake. Total VFA concentration was lower (P = 0.04) in goats fed LES than those fed BG, and goats fe d LES had the lowest ruminal ammonia N concentrations among legume supplemented diets. These factors may be due to binding of dietary carbohydrate and CP fractions by the CT in LES. Nevertheless, because the concentration of CT in LES was low (<5%), such bonds are likely to have been broken in the abomasum (Barry et al., 2001). It must be noted however that the values for concentrations o n this study were within the normal range (100 t0 120 mM/L) characteristic of forage fed ruminants (Bergm an, 1990) were similar for BG, CWP and

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70 PEA but lower for SOY than those reported by Foster et al. (2009) and higher for BG, PEA but lower for LES than reported by Zarate, 2012 Concentrations of individual VFA, the acetate to pro pionate ratio, and PUN and Pglu concentrations were not affected by treatment but PUN and Pglu concentrations were within the normal ranges (8 to 20 and 50 to 80 mg/dL; Kenako, 1989) and they approximated those reported by Foster et al. (2009) and Zarate ( 2012). Hammond, (1997) reported that increased solubility or degradability of dietary protein leads to increased r uminal ammonia N concentrations and a corresponding increase in the concentration of P UN However, despite their high rumen degradable prote in concentrations and their tendency to increase rumen ammonia concentration, legume supplementation did not affect PUN concentration. Parasite burden All the animals in the Control treatment had been dewormed by d 35 due to low PCV consequently the dat a reported is from the first 28 d of the experiment. Supplementing BG with LES reduced (P = 0.01) the FEC of GIN (Table 3 6) the majority of which are eggs of H. contortus since this worm usually accounts for 75 to 100% of the total fecal nematode egg ou tput (Mortensen et al., 2003). This result agrees with the report of Terrill et al. (2009), which stated inclusion of LES at 50% of diet DM is effective at reducing FEC in goats and possibly reducing pasture infection with GIN larvae. Similarly, Lange et a l. (2006) reported that LES was as effective or better at reducing FEC in sheep and eliminating established adult worm burdens than an anthelmintic treatment when resistance is present. In this study, LES hay reduced GIN FEC by 58.6%, which was less than t he 67 98% FEC reduction reported by Lange et al. (2006) when BG hay was replaced completely by LES hay.

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71 Terrill et al. (2009) stated that although feeding SL at 50% of the diet would be beneficial for possible reduction of pasture infection with GIN larv ae, a higher level (>50%) of inclusion of dried LES is needed to kill adult worms. In contrast, in a complementary study to this one at the University of Florida, Zarate (2012), a diet containing 50% of LES and 50% of BG reduced the population of adult GIN worms in the abomasum by 52%. Adult worms were not enumerated in this study because all goats on the BG diet had been dewormed by d 35 due to low PCV values. It was interesting to note that though GIN FEC values for SOY and PEA did not differ (P>0.05) f rom those of BG or LES, they tended (P = 0.06 and 0.11) to be less than those of BG. Therefore, feeding SOY or LES tended (P < 0.1) to reduce GIN FEC by 31.0 and 25.3%, respectively. In a complementary study, Zarate (2012) reported that PEA supplementation reduced GIN adult worms in goats by 42% but SOY was not included in the study. The results in this and the complementary study are perhaps the first indications that feeding SOY and PEA can reduce the parasite burden of small ruminants. Parasite inhibitin g secondary metabolites are not known to occur in high concentrations in these forages, therefore their inhibitory effects on the parasites are likely attributable to the enhanced immune response resulting from the increased nutritional status of goats fed these diets. Supplementing BG with LES tended (P = 0.08) to reduce Eimeria FEC relative to feeding BG alone, perhaps reflecting the inhibitory action of the tannins in LES. In contrast, and for unknown reasons, supplementation with CWP tended to increas e the counts.

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72 Indices of anemia and the immune response Supplementation with SB and PEA increased (P = 0.01) the PCV relative to fee d ing BG alone (Table 3 6 ). A similar trend (P = 0.09) was evident for LES but that for CWP was only numerical (P = 0.19). It is estimated that each GIN worm sucks about 0.05 ml of blood per day by ingestion and causes seepage from lesions (Urquhart et al. 2000; Waller and Chandrawathani, 2005) thereby accounting for lower PCV values in parasitized ruminants. In this study, SO Y, LES, and PEA increased the PCV reflecting their inhibitory effects on anemia causing GIN. These responses could be attributed to beneficial effects of supplementation on the immune response of the goats. Bown et al. (1991) reported that protein supplem entation is effective at enhancing specific immune responses for intestinal parasite infection. Nutrition affects the ability of the host to cope with the consequences of parasitism and to contain and eventually overcome parasitism (Coop and Kyriazakis, 20 01). All legumes tended (P = 0.08) to increase FAMACHA scores. The FAMACHA chart is an alternative to PCV measurements that allows for frequent, cheap and easy monitoring of the worm infection status of animals in order to decide which animals require se lective treatment (Bath et al., 2001). van Wyk and Bath (2002) reported that during the course of fatal haemonchosis, the color of the conjunctivae of ruminants changes from the deep red of healthy ruminant, through shades of pink to practically white, as a result of a progressively worsening anemia. The FAMACHA results demonstrate that legume supplementation reduced anemia in goats, thus confirming packed cell volume results. Likewise, legume supplementation reduced (P = 0.001) haptoglobin concentrations but the effects differed with time (P < 0.001; Figure 3 1 ). Haptoglobin concentrations increased over time and were persistently greater than

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73 those of all treatments except CWP from weeks 2 4 This reflects the inflammatory stress resulting from GIN parasi tism, which required a heightened immune defense response. In contrast, the haptoglobin concentrations in goats fed SB, PEA, and LES were lower than those of goats fed BG though LES consistently had the lowest values. The lower haptoglobin concentrations r eflect lower inflammatory stress response due to the lower level of GIN parasitism in goats fed SB, PEA, and LES Sericea Lespedeza probably had the least haptoglobin concentrations because of the inhibitory effect of the CT it contained on GIN larvae deve lopment and adult worm survival (Shaik et al., 2006). Animal performance and indices of resilience Table 3 7 shows the effects of supplementing BG hay with the legumes on the performance of goats. Supplementation with SB, PEA and LES increased (P < 0.01) DMI expressed as g/head/day or % of BW. Lespedeza and PEA had the greatest DMI whereas CWP had the least among the supplemental legumes, perhaps due to the thick stems and high ADF concentration of CWP. Dry matter intake for goats fed LES and PEA were si milar to the 3.0 3.4% of body weight recommended for a 25 kg goat (NRC, 2007; Mamoon, 2008) and those for all forages were greater than values in digestibility phase This may have been because animals were more accustomed to being handled in the perform ance phase of the study (pen feeding) and the stress of being fitted with a fecal bag and housed individually in a metabolism crate was absent. G oats fed SOY and LES gained more BW than the expected 25 g/ head/ d, and those fed CWP and PEA gained less for reasons that are not clear. Legume supplementation did not result in a statistically greater ADG relative to that of goats fed BG This may be due to the short duration of the monitoring period. In addition, the

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74 beneficial effects of legume supplementati on on performance may have been masked by the low levels of parasitic infection. Coop et al. (1995) suggested that the reduced animal performance in parasitized ruminants is due to competing demands for available nutrients between growth, repair of gastroi ntestinal pathology, and the immune response. Hoste (2001) reported that the pathophysiological effects of parasite infections include loss of appetite, intestinal motility and flow alterations, such as increased gastric pH, and impaired energy and protein metabolism. Table 3 8 shows the effects of dietary treatments on indices of resilience to parasitism during the entire 49 d study. It took longer for the PCV of goats fed LES, PEA, and SB to drop to 19 and 15% than for goats fed CWP and BG. In additio n, 62.5% (5/8) of goats were euthanized due to low PCV (15%) in the BG and CWP treatments, whereas 32.5% (3/8), 12.5% (1/8) and 0% (0/8) were euthanized in the SB, PEA, and LES treatments, respectively. Therefore, th e s e data support the other results of t he study indicating that resilience to parasitism was increased by feeding SB, PEA and LES but not CWP. That no goats were euthanized on the LES diet confirms that it was the most effective dewormer. The deworming efficacy of LES has been shown in several other studies (Lange et al., 2006; Terrill et al., 2009), but this is perhaps the first study indicating that SB and PEA may also increase the resilience of goats to GIN.

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75 CHAPTER 4 CONCLUSIONS All over the world, m ost goats are raised on pastur e or native range based extensive systems for economic reasons. Bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum Flgge) is the major pasture grass used by the livestock industry in Florida as well as the southern Coastal Plains of Georgia and Alabama (Blount et al., 2001) The yield of bahiagrass is normally sufficient to meet intake requirements of most ruminant livestock during the grazing season. However, the quality is often insufficient for growing or lactating ruminants due to low dry matter (DM) digestibility and c rude protein (CP) concentration (Duble et al., 1971; Johnson et al., 2001; Redmon, 2002). As such, supplements may be necessary for optimal growth of goats, and because protein is usually limiting in grass based diets, protein supplementation usually impro ves production of goats fed warm season grasses (Ahmed and Nour, 1997; Ott et al., 2002). Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), particularly Haemonchus contortus are one of the most important disease constraints to small ruminant productivity in the world (O ver et al., 1992; Perry et al., 2002) and they present the greatest danger to the viability of the goat industry in the southeastern region of the United States (Leite Browning, 2006). Control of GIN based on suppressive or therapeutic use of drugs (Coop a nd Kyriazakis, 2001) has resulted in widespread anthelmintic resistance in goats, sheep and cattle in many areas of the world (Prichard, 1994; Waller, 1994, 1997; Pomroy et al., 2002) including the southern US (Miller and Craig, 1996; Zajac and Gipson, 200 0; Terrill et al., 2001; Mortensen et al., 2003). Therefore, sustainable alternative strategies are needed to reduce the GIN burden of ruminant livestock. This study sought to investigate the potential of using warm season legumes adapted to Florida to re duce the parasite

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76 burden of goats and enhance their performance. In phase 1, the study determined the effects of supplementing bahiagrass ( Paspalum notatum Flgge; BG) hay with hays of perennial peanut ( Arachis glabrata Benth.) (PEA), soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.] (SOY), cowpea [ Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] (CWP), or sericea lespedeza ( Lespedeza cuneata Dum. Cuors. G. don) (LEA] on feed intake, digestibility, and nitrogen (N) retention. A further objective examined the effects of the same diets on growt h performance, immune response and parasite burden in goats. Forty Boer Spanish Kiko goats weighing 24.3 9.8 kg were orally dewormed with Albendazole (Valbazen, 10 mg/kg BW) and Moxidectin (Cydectin, 0.4 mg/kg BW), stratified by body weight and rando mly assigned to diets of bahiagrass hay alone or supplemented (50% of diet dry matter) with LES, PEA, CWP or SOY hay. Diets were fed for ad libitum consumption for 16 days of adaptation and 7 days of measurement of feed intake and feces and urine output. G oats were then naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus L3 larvae and Eimeria spp. oocytes by grazing bahiagrass pasture infested with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) for 42 days. Subsequently, goats were housed in 20 m 2 pens (3 pens per treatment, 2 3 goats per pen) and fed the phase 1 diets for 49 days. Representative samples of each feed, orts, jugular blood, and feces were taken weekly and stored for further analysis. Body weights were measured at the beginning and end of the experiment and weekly in the intervening period. Goats were monitored weekly for evidence of parasite infection using the FAMACHA eye chart (Van Wyk and Bath, 2002) and by monitoring blood packed cell volume and haptoglobin concentrations and fecal egg counts of trichostrongyle s and Eimeria spp.

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77 I ntakes of DM, OM, NDF and CP were only increased by supplementation with LES and PEA. All legumes increased or tended to increase N digestibility and ruminal ammonia N concentration. However, N retention was only increased by suppleme ntation with LES and PEA. S upplementation with PEA, LES and SB increased or tended to increase PCV, decreased FAMACHA scores and prevented the parasitism induced increase in the immune response due to feeding BG or CWP. Feeding LES reduced FEC of GIN and f eeding PEA and SB had the same tendency. Feeding LES, PEA and SB increased DMI compared to BG but did not increase ADG. Perennial peanut and SB are promising supplements for increasing the resilience of goats to GIN parasites but LES was the most effectiv e treatment. To enhance understanding of the feeding behavior and growth performance of goats as influenced by legume supplementation, further research is required to: 1) separately quantify the amounts of legume and basal diet consumed by goats in order to quantify the DMI and energy and protein supply from the basal and supplemental dietary components, 2) determine effects of processing (chopping) grass and legume hays on intake and digestion 3) quantify legume supplementation effects on the number, via bility, and identity of infective larvae and adult GIN worms, and 4) examine effects of substituting BG hay with each legume on parasite burden and animal performance, 5) elucidate the mechanisms by which SB and PEA reduced the FEC of GIN in the goats.

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78 Table 3 1 Chemical C omposition of T he B ahiagrass, P erennial P eanut, S ericea L espedeza, C owpea and S oybean H ays Component Bahiagrass Cowpea Soybean Peanut Lespedeza SEM DM,% 89.8 88.5 89.1 89.3 90.5 0.004 Ash, % of DM 8.5 8.5 7.9 7.9 8.6 0.07 OM,% of D M 91.6 91.5 92.1 92.1 91.4 0.1 CP,% of DM 7.9 10.7 13.5 12.5 13.1 0.25 NDF,% of DM 76.6 60.9 58.3 45.8 61.1 0.5 ADF,% of DM 37.4 46.3 40.8 32.2 43.4 0.5 ADL,% of DM 3.46 10 9.7 9 16 0.17 Condensed tannins, % of DM ND ND ND 0.5 3.9 0.16 ND = not dete cted. Table 3 2 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on I ntake of D ry M atter (DMI), O rganic M atter (OMI), N eutral D etergent F iber (NDFI), and N itrogen (NI) BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM P value DMI, g 297 241 252 384 394 25.9 0.07 OMI, g 291 224 229 367 360 50.3 0.06 NDFI, g 253 177 174 259 278 41.1 0.09 CPI, g 24.9 b 22.8 b 26.6 b 40.8 a 41.2 a 5.6 0.01 a, b, c Means within a row with different superscripts differ (P < 0.05)

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79 Table 3 3 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on D igestibility of D ry M atter (DMD), O rganic M atter (OMD), N eutral D etergent F iber (NDFD) and N itr ogen (ND) BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM P value DMD, % 55.1 60.6 57.2 60.5 59.3 3.09 0.42 OMD, % 55.6 60.1 57 61.1 61 3.43 0.58 NDFD, % 61.6 63.6 58.12 60.07 60.3 3.26 0.72 ND, % 40.8 b 53.6 a 55.5 a 58.9 a 55.6 a 4 0.01 a, b, c Means within a row with differe nt superscripts differ (P < 0.05) Table 3 4 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on N itrogen (N) B alance BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM P value N intake g/d 3.66 3 .66 4.32 6.17 6.34 0.99 0.06 Fecal N output, g/d 2.13 1.68 1.7 2.29 2.71 0.44 0.2 Urinary N output, g/d 0.75 0.93 0.87 0.56 0.38 0.25 0.45 Retained N, g/d 0.14 b 1.19 b 1.12 b 2.30 ab 2.84 a 0.64 0.03 a b, c Means within a row with different superscripts differ (P < 0.05)

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80 Table 3 5 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on R uminal F ermentation I ndices and B lood U rea N itrogen (BUN) and P lasma G lucose (PGlu) C on centrations of G oats BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM P value Ruminal pH 6.44 6.39 6.60 6.34 6.59 0.20 0.72 Ammonia N, mg/L 34.3 51.1 49.7 40.3 35.8 5.61 0.08 Total VFA mM 115 ab 101 bc 96.4 bc 127 a 85.8 c 10.0 0.04 Acetate, mmol/100 mmol 72.0 72.5 72.0 73.9 78. 3 2.93 0.47 Propionate, mmol/100 mmol 22.0 20.4 19.8 20.3 17.0 1.83 0.35 Butyrate mmol/100 mmol 5.41 5.91 6.93 6.15 2.48 1.23 0.13 Acetate:propionate 3.30 3.58 3.78 3.69 4.62 0.46 0.30 BUN, mg/dL 11.3 10.5 12.8 12.0 12.3 1.01 0.52 PGlu, mg/dL 71.5 63 .9 67.4 68.0 69.3 4.03 0.70 a, b, c Means within a row with different superscripts differ ( P < 0.05)

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81 Table 3 6 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on G a strointestinal (GIN), Eimeria sp. (EIM) F ecal E gg C ounts (FEC) P acked C ell V olume, FAMACHA S cores and H aptoglobin C oncentration of G oats P value BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM Trt 1 Week Trt x week GIN FEC, eggs/g 2773 a 2640 a 1914 ab* 2072 ab** 114 7 b 284 0.01 0.24 0.14 EIM FEC, eggs/g 1923 2700 2197 2162 1246 362 0.08 <0.01 0.11 Packed cell volume, % 21.5 b 26.4 ab 30.1 a 29.6 a 27.5 ab 1.59 0.01 <0.001 0.67 FAMACHA scores 2.29 1.86 1.66 1.53 1.78 0.18 0.08 <0.001 0.19 Haptoglobin, arbitrary units (x 100) 5.83 a 4.68 b 3.45 dc 3.87 c 2.99 d 0.15 <0.001 <0.001 <0.001 a, b, c Means within a row with different superscripts differ (P < 0.05) Differed from BG (P = 0.06) ** Differed from BG ( P = 0.11) 1 Treatment.

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82 Table 3 7 Effects of S uppleme nting B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP) and S oybean (SB) H ays on T he P erformance of G oats P values BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM Trt 1 week Trt x week DMI, g /d 426 d 562 cd 630 bc 803 ab 863 a 79 < 0.01 0.02 0.06 DMI as % of 2.26 b 2.27 b 3.02 a 3.22 a 3.37 a 0.16 <0.01 0.58 0.83 BW 2 Initial BW, kg 24.9 24.4 23.5 25.1 24.7 3.34 1 NA NA Final BW, kg 25 24.1 24.5 25.6 26.2 3.75 1 NA NA ADG 3 g/day 4.46 9.12 35.2 15.4 51.6 22.2 0.37 NA NA a, b Means within a row with different superscripts differ (P < 0.05) 1 Treatment 2 BW = body weight 3 ADG = average daily gain.

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83 Table 3 8 Effects of S upplementing B ahiagrass (BG) H ay with P erennial P eanut (PEA), S ericea L espedeza (LES), C owpea (CWP ) and S oybean (SB) H ays on I ndices of R esilience of G oats to P arasitism BG CWP SB PEA LES SEM P value Days to PCV 1 <19% 21.1 b 31.2 ab 37.7 a 42.1 a 38.6 a 4.09 0.005 Days to PCV < 15% 29.7 c 32.3 bc 41.1 ab 42.0 ab 47.2 a 4.09 0.005 % Euthanized 62.5 62.5 37 .5 12.5 0 0.018 1 Packed cell volume

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84 Figure 3 1 Effects of Supplementing Bahiagrass (BG) Hay with Perennial Peanut (PEA), Sericea Lespedeza (LES), Cowpea (CWP) and Soybean (SB) Hays on Haptoglobin Concentrations Means at the Week ndicated differed (P < 0.05). Error bars are standard errors *

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122 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Born in Mzimba district (Malawi), Hamie Joseph Chakana is the second c hild of Bennet Mzomera Hamie and Angerine Soko. He received the Malawi School Certificate of Education ( Ordinary level equivalent) at Robert Laws Secondary School Mzimba from 1994 1998. In May 1999 he was admitted to Bunda C ollege of Agriculture, a con stituent c ollege of the University of Malawi. In May 2003, he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science (BS c ) in a griculture with specialization in c rop s cience. Shortly after graduating (June 2003), he was employed as an Agricultural Research Scien tist with the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development in the Department of Agricultural Research Services (DARS) and was based at Chitala Agricultural Research S tation in Salima. He was attached to the Livestock and Pastures Research Team to develop pasture production and management technologies and information and services for use by livestock farmers and stakeholders. In 2007, he was promoted to the post of Principal Agricultural Research Scientist. He has held several administrative posts such as Station Manager for Research S tations and Acting National Research Coordinator for the Livestock and Pastures Re search P rograms. Through financial support from the United Tates Agency for International Devel opment ( USAID ) Initiative for Long Tern Training and Capacity Building (UILTCB) program and the Malawi Government, Joseph was admited to the University of Florida to pursue a M aster of S cience (M S ) degree program under th e supervision of Prof. Adegbola T Adesogan in the Department of Animal Sciences. At the University of Florida he was privileged to learn the principles and practices of animal welfare, husbandry, production and management from seasoned p rofessors, technical staff and

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123 other students. He i s glad to present the results of his research in this thesis as part of the requirements of the M aster of S c ien c e program.